Diversity in Underutilized Plant Species – An Asia-Pacific Perspective



Yüklə 1.4 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/20
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü1.4 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

Diversity in Underutilized  
Plant Species 
–  An  Asia-Pacific  Perspective
R.K. Arora
Former Coordinator, Bioversity International 
Sub-Regional  Office  for  South  Asia,  New  Delhi
Bioversity International
National  Agriculture  Science  Centre  (NASC),  Dev  Prakash  Shastri  Marg, 
Pusa  Campus,  New  Delhi  110012,  India
Bioversity-india@cgiar.org

November,  2014
© Bioversity International
ISBN  No.  :  978-92-9255-007-3
Author  :  R.K.  Arora
Reviewed, Enlarged, Consolidated and Edited by:
E.  Roshini  Nayar,  Anjula  Pandey  &  Umesh  Srivastava
Citation  :   Arora, R.K. (2014). Diversity in Underutilized Plant Species – An Asia-
Pacific  Perspective.  Bioversity  International,  New  Delhi,  India  203  p.
Published by:
Bioversity International
National  Agriculture  Science  Centre  (NASC),  Dev  Prakash  Shastri  Marg,   
Pusa  Campus,  New  Delhi  110012,  India
Email:  bioversity-india@cgiar.org
Website:  www.bioversityinternational.org

Contents
Foreword 
v
Preface 
ix
Acronyms  and  Abbreviations 
xiii
A  Tribute  to  Dr.  R.K.  Arora 
xvii
Obituaries  &  Reminiscences 
xix
 
I.  Introduction 
1
 
 
Asia-Pacific  region:  Richness  in  plant  diversity 
1
 
 
Harnessing  underutilized  plant  species  diversity 
4
 
 
Cultivated  plant  diversity  vis-à-vis  underutilized  species 
4
 
 
Concerns  on  underutilized  species 
6
 
 
Major  thrust  for  R&D:  Institutions  involved 
7
 
 
Criteria  for  identifying  underutilized  species/crops 
8
 
 
Importance  of  underutilized  species 
9
 
 
–  Synthesis/Information  presented 
10
 
II.   Underutilized  Species  in  the  Asia-Pacific:  Distribution,   
Diversity  and  Use 
12
 
 
1.  Pseudocereals  and  Millets 
14
 
 
2.  Grain  Legumes/Pulses 
18
 
 
3.  Root  and  Tubers 
21
 
 
4.  Vegetables 
28
 
 
5.  Fruits 
51
 
 
6.  Nuts 
91

iv | 
D
iversity
 
in
 U
nDerUtilizeD
 P
lant
 s
Pecies
 - a
n
 a
sia
-P
acific
 P
ersPective
 
 
7.  Miscellaneous 
97
 
 
8.  Industrial  Crops 
110
 
III.  Priority  Species  for  Research  and  Development 
115
 
IV.  Nutritional  Aspects 
122
 
 
–  Pseudocereals  and  Millets 
122
 
 
–  Grain  Legumes/Pulses 
125
 
 
–  Vegetables 
125
 
 
–  Fruits  and  Nuts 
131
 
V.  Emerging  Concerns 
134
 
 
1.  Diversity  distribution/assessment 
134
 
 
2.  Biotechnology  applications 
135
 
 
3.   Documenting  indigenous  knowledge/Ethnobotanical   
information 
136
 
 
4.  Ecological  security/habitat  protection 
137
 
 
5.  Utilization  and  conservation  aspects 
138
 
 
6.  Benefits  and  constraints 
141
 
 
7.  Networking  and  partnership 
143
 
 
8.  Further  thrust 
144
 
 
9.  Crops  for  the  future:  New  global  initiative 
145
 
VI.  Epilogue 
146
References 
148
Selected  Research  Papers  &  Other  Publications  of  Dr.  R.K.  Arora 
155
Annexures 
159
Index 
179

Foreword
The  Asia-Pacific  region  is  agriculturally  diverse  and  very  rich  in  plant  genetic 
resources, including those of underutilized species and less known food plants. 
Several  useful  plants  have  been  domesticated  in  this  region  and  are  important 
from  economic  development  and  food  security  point  of  view.
This publication deals with 778 underutilized cultivated food plants, pseudocereals, 
millets, grain legumes, root/tuber crops, vegetables, fruits and nuts, and several 
other  species  used  as  condiments,  and  for  agroforestry  development  and 
multipurpose uses. Besides, it also lists species of industrial use that need further 
focus for research and development. In addition to geographical and ecological 
coverage,  the  compilation  presents  information  on  utilization  of  these  relatively 
less utilised species, providing an analysis of their nutrition/food values. It also 
deals with required prioritisation of species for intensive research. Also, emphasis 
is  laid  on  the  native  as  well  as  endemic  species  needing  priority  attention  for 
both research and conservation. The chapter on ‘Emerging Concerns’, brings out 
useful  synthesis  of  information  concerning  the  use  of  genetic  diversity  through 
scientific assessment, use of biotechnology, ethnobotany, ecology, etc. and gives 
an  account  of  policy  implications.  It  also  points  out  to  the  role  of  different 
organizations  such  as  Bioversity  International  (formerly  IPGRI),  International 
Center  for  Underutilized  Crops  (ICUC),  and  regional  fora  such  as  Asia-Pacific 
Association of Agricultural Research Institutions (APAARI) in networking and setting 
up  new  institutional  arrangement,  namely,  ‘Crops  for  the  Future’  by  merging 
the  Global  Facilitation  Unit  GFU)  under  Bioversity  International  and  the  ICUC.
In  the  wake  of  emerging  realisation  about  the  importance  of  underutilised 
species, the account presented in this book will be useful in filling the gaps in 
research needs, in sorting out species of relatively more importance in different 
regions  such  as  :  East  Asia,  South  Asia,  Southeast  Asia  and  Pacific/Oceania. 
Enormous diversity of underutilized crops exists in the region but their potential 
is not fully exploited. Studies on these genetic resources need to be intensified. 
The  publication  amply  highlights  such  concerns.  Overall,  major  emphasis  has 
been laid on the effective and efficient utilization of these underutilized and less 
known  cultivated  species  mainly  grown  by  native  communities,  often  in  home 

vi | 
D
iversity
 
in
 U
nDerUtilizeD
 P
lant
 s
Pecies
 - a
n
 a
sia
-P
acific
 P
ersPective
gardens  and  marginal  lands,  towards  food  security,  addressing  malnutrition, 
poverty  alleviation  and  income  generation  –  thereby  helping  towards  meeting 
the  Millennium  Development  Goals  (MDGs).
Late  Dr.  R.K.  Arora  had  earlier  written  a  book  on  ‘Genetic  Resources  of  Less 
Known Cultivated Food Plants’, presenting worldwide analysis, which was published 
by  the  National  Bureau  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources  (NBPGR)  with  support  from 
International  Board  on  Plant  Genetic  Resources  (IBPGR).  This  publication  stems 
from  that  initiative.  The  work  embraced  in  this  book  is  confined  exclusively  to 
Asia-Pacific  region,  considering  the  importance  of  this  region  in  the  global 
context.  I  am  sure,  this  well  synthesized  account  will  generate  further  interest 
on  research  and  development  of  underutilized  crops  for  widening  our  food 
basket  in  the  region.
I  highly  appreciate  the  dedicated  efforts  made  by  late  Dr.  Arora,  just  prior 
to  his  demise,  in  bringing  out  this  very  thought-provoking  book  on  a  subject 
which needs much greater attention of all concerned. The National Agricultural 
Research  Systems  (NARS)  in  Asia-Pacific  region,  regional  fora  like  APAARI, 
members of national and international organizations, researchers, teachers and 
students  will  find  this  publication  immensely  useful  and  rewarding.  I  greatly 
appreciate  the  sincere  efforts  made  by  Drs.  Roshini  Nayar,  Anjula  Pandey 
and  Umesh  Srivastava  in  finalising  the  manuscript  which  Dr.  Arora  attempted 
but  could  not  finish,  by  adding  some  useful  information,  where  necessary  and 
revising the same to enhance its utility. I also appreciate very much the funding 
support  extended  by  Bioversity  International,  mainly  through  special  efforts  of 
Dr. P.N. Mathur, South Asia Coordinator for bringing out this publication. Help 
of  Dr.  Bhag  Mal,  Senior  Consultant,  APAARI  in  perusing  the  manuscript  and 
advising  the  final  layout  is  also  acknowledged.
Raj Paroda
Executive  Secretary
APAARI

The  book  commemorates  his  passion  and  dedication  to  the  field  of 
underutilized  crops  and  useful  wild  relatives  of  crop  plants.
Dr. R.K. Arora

Preface
Nature  has  provided  different  sources  of  life  forms  on  which  human  survived 
on  planet  Earth.  Primitive  man  ate  all  types  of  fruits,  leaves,  roots  and  tubers 
of  plants  collecting  from  wild;  before  he  learnt  to  grow  plants.  Many  wild 
edible  plants  are  nutritionally  rich  and  supplement  nutritional  requirements  of 
human  and  livestock,  especially  the  vitamins  and  micronutrients.  Underutilized 
plant  species  have  great  potential  for  contribution  to  food  security,  health 
(nutritional  and/or  medicinal),  income  generation  and  environmental  services, 
but  these  have  remained  underexploited.  One  important  reason  for  their 
underutilization  is  that  they  are  neglected  by  mainstream  research  which 
did  not  provide  solutions  to  agronomic  and  post-harvest  constraints,  nor  did 
it  develop  attractive  value  added  products  for  a  broader  market.  In  recent 
years,  however,  underutilized  plant  species  have  received  increased  attention 
by  National  Agricultural  Research  Systems  (NARS),  policy-makers  and  funding 
institutions, recognizing their importance for diversification of farming systems, 
and thus mitigating the impacts of environmental and economic disasters on the 
rural poor. These increased efforts need direction and focus to yield significant 
and  visible  impact.  The  International  Centre  for  Underutilised  Crops  (ICUC), 
the Global Facilitation Unit for Underutilized Species (GFU) and the Bioversity 
International  (earlier  IPGRI)  had  a  wide  consultation  process  with  the  aim  of 
developing a strategic framework to guide future work on underutilized species. 
The  world  is  presently  over-dependent  on  a  few  plant  species.  Diversification 
of  production  and  consumption  habits  to  include  a  broader  range  of  plant 
species, in particular those currently identified as ‘underutilized’, can contribute 
significantly to improved health and nutrition, livelihoods, household food security 
and  ecological  sustainability.  In  particular,  these  plant  species  offer  enormous 
potential  for  contributing  to  the  achievement  of  the  Millenium  Development 
Goals (MDGs), particularly in combating hidden hunger and offering medicinal 
and  income  generation  options. 
The Asia-Pacific region holds rich biodiversity in underutilized plant species. It 
is a centre of diversification and domestication of crop plants. Being culturally, 
ethnically  and  ecologically  very  diverse,  several  underutilized  species  are 
grown  here  and  maintained  by  native  farmers  under  subsistence  agriculture. 

x | 
D
iversity
 
in
 U
nDerUtilizeD
 P
lant
 s
Pecies
 - a
n
 a
sia
-P
acific
 P
ersPective
Four  regions  of  diversity,  namely,  Chinese-Japanese,  Indochinese-Indonesian, 
Australian/Pacific  and  Indian  region  are  located  in  this  region.  Also,  eight 
out of the 17 mega-biodiversity countries namely Indonesia, Australia, China, 
India,  Malaysia,  PNG,  the  Philippines  and  Thailand  are  in  this  region.
Dr.  R.K.  Arora,  during  his  long  career  as  plant  collector,  was  instrumental  in 
locating underexploited and underutilized domesticated/semi-domesticated and 
wild  plants  particularly  those  used  by  ethnic  communities  in  north-eastern  and 
other regions of India. He had earlier written a book on ‘Genetic Resources of 
Less Known Cultivated Food Plants’ presenting  world  wide  analysis  in  the  year 
1985.  This  publication  stems  from  that  account  but  Dr.  Arora,  in  the  present 
book, extended the scope of his study and documentation within the Asia and 
Pacific region, an area known to have rich ethnic diversity and historically linked 
biogeographic  regions  of  plant  diversity,  both  native  and  introduced.  Actually, 
the  account  was  mostly  prepared  by  him  but  unfortunately,  he  could  not  do 
the final consolidation and editing during his life time due to prolonged illness. 
Dr.  Raj  Paroda  desired  that  his  left  over  work  may  be  completed,  published 
and dedicated in his remembrance and also to commemorate his passion and 
dedication  to  the  field  of  underutilized  crops  and  useful  wild  relatives  of  crop 
plants. At his instance, the unfinished work was reviewed critically, information 
added where necessary, consolidated and edited by his colleagues Drs. E. Roshini 
Nayar,  Anjula  Pandey  and  Umesh  Srivastava  to  bring  it  to  its  present  shape 
while  the  text  as  close  to  the  original  manuscript  as  possible.
It  deals  with  the  enumeration  of  778  species  of  underutilized  and  less 
known  minor  food  plants  grown  in  different  regions  of  Asia-Pacific.  It  has 
6  chapters  and  information  presented  has  been  classified  under  use-based 
categories such as cereals/pseudocereals (28 species), grain legumes/pulses 
(14  species),  roots  and  tubers  (55  species),  vegetables  (213  species),  fruits 
(261  species),  nuts  (34  species),  industrial  crops  (25  species)  and  those 
providing spices, condiments, and of multi-purpose use (148 species) including 
agro-forestry  species  and  environment-friendly  species.  The  choice  for  the 
priority  species  for  R&D  needs  has  also  been  suggested/discussed  and  the 
role of native/endemic diversity dealt with. Also information has been added 
to provide relative analysis of food/nutritional values of selected underutilized 
species.  A  thought-provoking  need-based  focus  is  also  given  for  the  use  of 
other  disciplines  in  meeting  the  growing  need  to  promote  and  assess  this 
diversity:  use  of  biotechnology,  ethnobotany  and  documenting  indigenous 
knowledge, diverse uses and conservation of such species. The greater need 
for  partnership/networking  at  national,  regional  and  international  level  for 
realizing  the  full  potential  of  underutilized  species  has  also  been  stressed 
a  great  deal.

P
reface
 | xi
We  express  our  gratitude  to  Dr.  Raj  Paroda,  Former  Secretary,  Department  of 
Agricultural Research & Education (DARE) and Director General, Indian Council 
of  Agricultural  Research  (ICAR),  currently  Executive  Secretary,  APAARI  and 
Chairperson, Trust for Advancement of Agricultural Sciences (TAAS), New Delhi 
for  his  constant  encouragement  in  bringing  out  the  book  and  also  for  writing 
the  ‘Foreword’  to  this  book.  Our  sincere  thanks  to  Dr.  Prem  Mathur,  Regional 
Director,  APO  Office  and  South  Asia  Coordinator,  New  Delhi  of  Bioversity 
International  for  taking  keen  interest  in  the  book  and  also  funding  etc,  and 
Dr.  Bhag  Mal,  Senior  Consultant,  APAARI  for  constant  guiding,  pursuing  and 
advising  throughout  the  finalization  of  manuscript.  Furthermore  we  would  like 
to acknowledge our colleagues in NBPGR ( Drs. K.C. Bhatt, K. Pradheep, S.K. 
Malik,  Anuradha  Agrawal,  K.V.  Bhat,  Soyimchiten  and  Mr.  O.P.  Dhariwal)  for 
providing  certain  photographs.  In  addition,  Bioversity  International  has  kindly 
provided  permission  to  use  their  resources.  We  acknowledge  this  gesture.  We 
would  also  like  to  appreciate  the  efforts  of  Mr.  Vinay  Malhotra  of  Malhotra 
Publishing House, Kirti Nagar, New Delhi who has taken up the task of printing 
the  present  publication  satisfactorily.
It  is  felt  that  APAARI  member-NARS  and  other  members  including  concerned 
CG  centres,  researchers,  teachers,  students  and  all  those  engaged  and 
interested in the subject will find this well documented/synthesised information 
both  useful  and  rewarding.  We  are  sure,  the  book  will  generate  further 
interest  on  this  upcoming  subject  for  widening  the  food  basket  to  feed  the 
growing  population.
E. Roshini Nayar
Anjula Pandey
Umesh Srivastava

Acronyms and Abbreviations
ACIAR 
Australian  Centre  for  International  Agricultural  Research
ADB 
Asian  Development  Bank
AFCP 
AgriFood  Charity  Partnership
AFLPs 
Amplified  Fragment  Length  Polymorphism
APAARI 
Asia-Pacific  Association  of  Agricultural  Research  Institutions
APO 
Asia,  Pacific  &  Ocenia
AVRDC 
Asian  Vegetable  Research  &  Development  Center
BI 
Bioversity International 
BMZ 
 German  Federation  Ministry  for  Economic  Cooperation  and 
Development
BSI 
Botanical  Survey  of  India
CBD 
Convention  on  Biological  Diversity 
CGIAR 
Consultative  Group  on  International  Agricultural  Research
EST-SNP 
Expressed  Sequence  Tag-  Single  Nucleotide  Polymorphism
EST-SSR 
Expressed  Sequence  Tag-  Simple  Sequence  Repeat 
FAO 
Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  of  the  United  Nations 
FAO-RAP 
 Food & Agriculture Organization-Regional Office for Asia and the 
Pacific
GCDT 
Global  Crop  Diversity  Trust
GFAR 
Global  Forum  on  Agricultural  Research
GFU 
Global  Facilitation  Unit 
GPA 
Global  Plan  of  Action 

xiv | 
D
iversity
 
in
 U
nDerUtilizeD
 P
lant
 s
Pecies
 - a
n
 a
sia
-P
acific
 P
ersPective
IARI 
Indian  Agricultural  Research  Institute
IBPGR 
International  Board  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources 
IBS 
Indian  Botanical  Society
ICAR 
Indian  Council  of  Agricultural  Research 
ICARDA 
International  Center  for  Agricultural  Research  in  the  Dry  Areas
ICRISAT 
International  Crops  Research  Institute  for  Semi  Arid  Tropics
ICUC 
International  Centre  for  Underutilized  Crops 
IFAD 
International  Fund  for  Agricultural  Development 
IIHR 
Indian  Institute  of  Horticultural  Research 
IIVR 
Indian  Institute  for  Vegetable  Research 
IJPGR 
Indian  Journal  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources 
IK 
Indigenous  knowledge 
INRC 
Italian  National  Research  Council 
IPGRI 
International  Plant  Genetic  Resources  Institute
ISPGR 
Indian  Society  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources 
ISSR 
Inter  Simple  Sequence  Repeat
MDG 
Millenium  Development  Goals 
MSSRF 
M.S.  Swaminathan  Research  Foundation
NAAS 
National  Academy  for  Agricultural  Sciences
NARS 
National  Agricultural  Research  Systems 
NAS 
National  Academy  of  Sciences,  India 
NAS 
National  Academy  of  Sciences,  USA 
NBPGR 
National  Bureau  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources 
NHRI 
National  Horticultural  Research  Institute
PGR 
Plant  Genetic  Resources 
PNG 
Papua  New  Guinea
PROSEA 
Plant  Resource  of  South-East  Asia 

a
cronyms
 
anD
 a
bbreviations
 | xv
QRT 
Quinquinnial  Review  Team 
RAPD 
Random  Amplified  Polymorphic  DNA
RFLP 
Restriction  Fragment  Length  Polymorphism
SSR 
Simple  Sequence  Repeats
TAAS 
Trust  for  Advancement  of  Agricultural  Sciences
UNESCO 
 United  Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization
USDA 
United  States  Department  of  Agriculture
UTFANET 
Underutilized  Tropical  Fruits  in  Asia  Network
WHO 
World  Health  Organization

A Tribute to Dr. R.K. Arora
(14 December, 1932 – 3 March, 2010)
Dr.  Rajeshwar  Kumar  Arora  was  an  able  and  eminent  plant  scientist.  He  was 
born  in  Kamalia,  Lyallpur  (presently  Faisalabad  in  Pakistan)  on  14  December, 
1932. He received his graduation (1954), post-graduation (1956) and doctorate 
(1961) degrees in Botany from Panjab University. He devoted his entire career 
to the field of plant systematics, ethnobotany, phytogeography and plant genetic 
resources.  He  was  a  visionary  and  a  modest  human  par  excellence.
Dr. Arora started his professional career at the Botanical Survey of India where 
he  served  in  various  capacities  till  1968  when  he  joined  the  then  Division  of 
Plant  Introduction,  Indian  Agricultural  Research  Institute  (IARI),  New  Delhi  as 
Senior Scientist, where, besides conducting research on collection and evaluation 
of economically important plants, he taught post-graduate courses in systematic 
botany  and  economic  botany.  After  the  elevation  of  Plant  Introduction  Division 
to  a  full-fledged  institute,  the  National  Bureau  of  Plant  Genetic  Resources 
(NBPGR),  Dr.  Arora  served  as  the  Head,  Division  of  Plant  Exploration  and 
Germplasm  Collection  and  later  as  the  officiating  Director.  In  1989,  Dr.  Arora 
joined International Board of Plant Genetic Resources (later as International Plant 
Genetic  Resources  Institute  and  now  Bioversity  International),  Office  for  South 
Asia, New Delhi as Associate Coordinator and later as South Asia Coordinator. 
After  retirement,  he  continued  to  work  with  the  Bioversity  International  as 
Honorary  Research  Fellow  till  middle  of  2009  when  his  ill  health  forced  him 
to  work  from  home.
With his vast knowledge of Indian flora, Dr. Arora made pioneering contribution 
to  collection  and  documentation  of  economically  important  plants  of  India, 
particularly  wild  crop-related  species.  He  brought  to  public  knowledge  several 
less-known and under-utilized plants including Digitaria cruciataMoghania vestita 
and  Inula racemosa,  and  led  major  collection  missions  to  several  distant  and 
unexplored  areas  of  the  country.  His  surveys  contributed  very  significantly  to 
our knowledge of agricultural biodiversity in India. Keenly aware of the richness 
of  the  Indian  crop  gene  centre,  he  made  exceptional  efforts  in  coordinating 
activities  on  collection,  conservation  and  use  of  plant  genetic  resources. 

xviii | 
D
iversity
 
in
 U
nDerUtilizeD
 P
lant
 s
Pecies
 - a
n
 a
sia
-P
acific
 P
ersPective
Dr.  Arora  was  a  prolific  writer  which  combined  with  a  deep  understanding  of 
plant  genetic  resources  led  him  to  produce  a  number  of  original  and  highly 
informative  publications  like  “Wild  Relatives  of  Crop  Plants  in  India”,  “Genetic 
Resources  of  less-known  cultivated  Food  Plants”,  “Wild  Edible  Plants  of  India: 
Diversity  Conservation  and  Use”,  and  “Plant  Genetic  Resources  Conservation 
and  Management:  Concepts  and  Approaches”.  These  have  become  reference 
books  for  researchers,  students  and  policy  makers  engaged  in  plant  genetic 
resources  collection,  conservation  and  utilization.  Besides,  he  published  over 
160  articles  in  national  and  international  journals  and  presented  papers  in 
several  national/international  conferences  and  scientific  meetings. 
During  his  tenure  with  Bioversity  International,  Dr.  Arora  devoted  himself  to 
promoting  conservation  and  use  of  genetic  resources  at  the  international  level. 
In addition, he associated himself with the Asia-Pacific Association of Agricultural 
Research  Institutions  (APAARI)  and  lent  a  helping  hand  in  the  promotion  of 
agricultural  research  for  development  in  the  entire  Asia-Pacific  region.  He 
contributed very significantly towards publication of success stories, conference 
reports  and  the  newsletter  brought  out  by  Bioversity  International  and  APAARI.
Dr.  Arora  was  the  founder  Editor-in-Chief  (1987-88)  of  the  Indian  Journal  of 
Plant Genetic Resources (IJPGR) published by the Indian Society of Plant Genetic 
Resources (ISPGR). He was honoured with the “Dr. Harbhajan Singh Memorial 
Award” by the ISPGR and the “Harshberger Medal in Ethnobotany” by Society 
of Ethnobotany for his life-time contribution to research on economic plants. He 
was  elected  as  Fellow  of  National  Academy  for  Agricultural  Sciences  (NAAS), 
India;  National  Academy  of  Sciences  (NAS),  India;  Indian  Ethnobotanical 
Society;  and  Indian  Botanical  Society. 
He  was  very  keen  to  revise  his  earlier  publication  on  this  subject  and  started 
the  work  in  this  direction  but  could  not  complete  the  task  during  his  lifetime.
The  publication  partially  prepared  by  him  was  again  viewed  and  revised  by 
his collegues Drs. Roshini Nayar, Anjula Pandey and Umesh Srivastava to give 
final shape to it. This is being published and dedicated in his remembrance and 
also  to  commomerate  his  passion  and  dedication  to  the  field  of  underutilized 
crops  and  useful  wild  relatives  of  crop  plants.
Excerpts from obituary written by Drs. Raj Paroda and E. Roshini Nayar and published in Current 
Science  98(12):  1640  (2010)
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə