Diversity of fruit trees and frugivores in a nigerian montane forest and adjacent fragmented forests



Yüklə 158.3 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü158.3 Kb.

Volume-1, Issue-2 :2011                        

www.ijpaes.com

                                ISSN 2231-4490 

DIVERSITY OF FRUIT TREES AND FRUGIVORES IN A NIGERIAN MONTANE 

FOREST AND ADJACENT FRAGMENTED FORESTS

Ihuma, J. O.

1

, Chima, U.

 

D.

2

 and Chapman, H.M.

3

1

Department of Biological Sciences, Bingham University, P.M.B. 005, Karu, Nasarawa State, 

Nigeria.

eromey2k@yahoo.com



2

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Port Harcourt- Choba, 

P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria. punditzum@yahoo.ca

3

Department of  Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury/Nigerian Montane Forest Project, 

Private bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand. hazel.chapman@canterbury.ac.nz

ABSTRACT : The study was conducted to examine and compare the species composition, diversity, and 

richness of both fruit trees and frugivores between a protected natural forest – Main Forest (MF), and 

unprotected forest fragments (A, B, and C) within a Nigerian montane forest ecosystem. Five 20m x 20m 

quadrats  were  randomly distributed in each of  the sites  for  the enumeration of fruit trees while the 

identification and enumeration of frugivores was carried out using the Random Walk/Watch method. 

Alpha   diversity  was   measured   using   both  Simpson   and  Shannon-Wiener   indices   while   similarity  or 

otherwise   dissimilarity   in   species   composition   between   each   pair   of   the   sites   was   measured   using 

Sorenson’s index. Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was used to examine the correlation between the 

diversity of fruit trees and frugivores. The highest number of fruit tree species was encountered in MF 

(46), followed by Fragment A (24) while 21 species were encountered in each of fragments B and C. The 

highest number of frugivorous species was encountered in MF (39), followed by each of Fragments A and 

B (26) while 25 species were encountered in C. Birds  accounted for over 70 per cent of the frugivorous 

species observed within the five taxonomic groups in all the sites. Both the fruit trees and frugivore 

species composition varied more between the main forest and each of the fragments than between each 

pair of the fragments. However, the level of dissimilarity in species composition between the main forest 

and the fragments was more with the fruit trees than the frugivores. A total of 36, 34, and 33 fruit tree 

species found in MF were not found in fragments C, B, and A respectively while 26 frugivorous species 

were common to MF & A and MF & B, while MF & C have 24 species in common.  The diversity of fruit 

trees and that of frugivores were highly correlated. Both the number and diversity of fruit trees and 

frugivores were higher in the protected main forest than in each of the forest fragments.



Key words: Montane Ecosystem; Forest Fragmentation; Fruit Trees; Frugivores; Diversity

INTRODUCTION

Frugivores (fruit-eating animals) depend on pulp of fleshy fruits, which is the soft, edible, nutritive tissues 

surrounding the seeds, as primary food resource [15]. Frugivores apart from depending on fruits to satisfy 

their   nutrient   requirements   also   double   as   seed   dispersers.   Seed   dispersal   determines   the   spatial 

arrangement and physical environment of seeds and thus is an important step in the reproductive cycle of 

most plants [9,16,30,26] 

The importance of seed dispersers and dispersal cannot be overemphasized.   Many tropical trees bear 

fruits adapted for consumption and dispersed by animals, and many tropical animals depend on fruits for 

food for at least part of the year [14]. Consequently, local extinction of fruit-eating birds, bats or primates 

might reduce recruitment of fruiting trees dependent upon frugivore-mediated dispersal for reproduction, 

and consequently increase the chance of local extinction of the focal trees, of other animals that eat their 

fruits, and ultimately of other trees dispersed by members of the initial assemblage [12].  



International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences           Page: 6 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

The general consequence could be a widening circle of extinctions, precipitated by the disappearance of 

one pivotal species [13]. In fact, the local extinction of some animal populations, or their reduction to the 

point   of   becoming   functionally  extinct,   can   have   dramatic   consequences   in   terms   of   regulating  and 

supporting ecosystem services, especially in mutualisms, such as pollination and seed dispersal [22,27]. 

Therefore, seed dispersal through frugivory is important in maintaining levels of genetic diversity. In 

addition, seed dispersal by frugivores plays an important role in bringing seeds of forest species into 

degraded landscapes, and this helps in forest restoration. 

Stretched along the Nigerian/Cameroon border are most of the Nigeria’s montane/sub-montane forests. 

Historically,   these   forests   were   located   in   expansive   sweeps   along   escarpment   edges   in   the   Gotel 

Mountains and Mambilla Plateau (Taraba State), and on Vogel Peak and the Kirri Plateau (Adamawa 

State). Montane forest also occurred as stream fringing forest meandering across the Jos (Plateau State), 

Obudu (Cross River) and Mambilla plateaus. Almost all the stream fringing forest has been lost from Jos 

Plateau, and it is now confined to small fragments on Obudu and Mambilla Plateaus. On Mambilla, there 

remains one significant sub-montane forest, Ngel Nyaki. The forest (approximately 7.2 km

2)  


falls within 

Ngel Nyaki

 

Forest Reserve which is 46 km



in area. The reserve is located on the western escarpment of 

Mambilla Plateau, in the bowl of an old volcanic crater from 1400-1600m elevation. It was gazetted a 

Local Authority Forest Reserve in 1969. Outside the reserve boundary is an unofficial ‘buffer zone’, 

comprising grassland and stream fringing forest. The forest reserve is known for its high diversity in 

fauna and flora [3]. 

It has become common knowledge in the world that serious conflicts arise in the uses of bio-edaphic 

resources and there is undue pressure on marginal lands in the arid zone States of Nigeria, which are 

characterized by fragile ecosystems [6]. Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve is currently beset with problems of 

fragmentation   and   exploitation   (especially   in   the   riverine   forest   strips   of   the   buffer   zone).   The 

fragmentation of forest habitat is widely considered to be one of the main threats to biodiversity while it 

has been established that habitat loss has large, negative effects on biodiversity [23]. There is therefore, 

the   need   to   restore   and   sustainably   manage   the   reserve   and   its   resources.     However,   sustainable 

restoration and management of the reserve require a thorough understanding of the influence of habitat 

fragmentation   and   exploitation   on   the   processes   that   shape   genetic   variation   and   other   ecological 

processes. The study therefore, evaluated the impact of habitat fragmentation and exploitation on fruit 

trees and fruit-eating animals by ascertaining and comparing their composition, diversity and richness or 

otherwise rarity, between unprotected forest fragments and the protected climax vegetation - the main 

forest (MF) within the reserve.

MATERIALS AND METHOD

Description of the Study Area

The study was conducted at Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve, located towards the western escarpment of the 

Mambilla plateau, Taraba State, Nigeria (Figure 1).The plateau is located between longitude 11

00



1

 and 


11

30



1

 East and latitude 6

30

1



 and 7

15



1

 North.  It is drained by numerous water courses which unite to 

form the main rivers to discharge eventually into the Benue River.  Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve can be 

reached on foot from Yelwa village past the Mayo Jigawal, from where it is less than an hour’s walk to 

the upper edge of the forest.   It comprises approximately 46km

2

  of impressive sub-montane to mid-



altitude forest, lying between 1400 – 1500m [3]. The forest vegetation is continued to the South-west 

facing slope where mist may lie for days, and sometimes a week at a time, during the rainy season. Heavy 

rainfall is recorded from April to October while the dry season is from approximately November  to 

March. 


International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences            Page: 7 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve and Game Sanctuary, is the most species diverse forest on Mambilla plateau 

[3]. Over 146 vascular plant species have been recorded, many of which are trees, and (near-) endemic to 

the Afromontane Region [28,4]. Four tree species are Red Data listed, and several, such as Anthonotha 



nolddii are new to West Africa and others new to Nigeria [3]. This high floristic diversity is reflected in 

the high number of primates and other animal species in the forest [8,5].  There is a small, but thriving 

population of the Red Data listed Chimpanzee (Pantroglodytes  subsp  vellerosus),  as well as the Putty-

Nosed monkeys (Cercopithecus nicitans) and the black and white colobus (colobus guereza occidentalis)

The forest is also rich in bird life, more than 200 species were documented in 2003 (Disley, personal 

communication). Ngel Nyaki was formally gazetted a local authority Forest Reserve under Gashaka - 

Mambilla Native Authority Forest order of April 1969, but at present it is under the management of the 

Taraba State Government and the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF), with the Nigerian Montane 

Forest Project (NMFP) as a project partner.

Figure 1: Ngel Nyaki Forest and the adjacent forest fragments.

Method of Data Collection

Identification and Enumeration of Fruit Trees

To gain an insight into the fruit tree species composition of the sites, five 20m x 20m quadrats were 

randomly distributed in each of the sites. This quadrat size falls within the range specified in literature for 

vegetation sampling by White and Edwards [29]. Narrow cut lines were made to demarcate the plot 

boundaries. All fruit trees within the plots were identified to species level and counted. Fruit tree species 

were identified using Keay et al., [21] and Chapman and Chapman [3]. A tree in this study was regarded 

as a woody plant of erect posture with a minimum breast circumference of 10cm and a minimum height 

of 5m.


International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                Page: 8 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

Identification and Enumeration of Frugivores

The identification and enumeration of frugivores was carried out using the Random Walk/Watch method 

(Disley pers. Com.). Random walks were carried out between 6.00 am and 6.00 pm once a week in each 

study site, for a period of twenty weeks, to ascertain the frugivorous species present. During each random 

walk, the number of individual frugivorous species sighted was recorded for the respective sites. This was 

then summed accordingly for the twenty days of random walk. The identification of birds in the field was 

done with the aid of Borrow & Demey [2] 

Method of Data Analysis 

Measurement of Alpha Diversity 

Two common approaches for measuring alpha diversity are species richness and evenness/heterogeneity 

[24].   Species   richness   simply   refers   to   the   number   of   species   in   the   community   while 

evenness/heterogeneity refers to the distribution of individuals among the species. In this study, species 

richness was computed for the fruit trees and frugivores as the total number of fruit tree species and 

frugivores   encountered   in   each   site   respectively.   For   the   measurement   of   evenness/heterogeneity, 

Simpson and Shannon-Wiener indices were computed for each of the sites using the PAlaeontological 

STatistics (PAST) software.  



Measurement of Beta Diversity    

Sorensen’s   similarity   index   was   used   to   measure   beta   diversity.   Wolda   [31]   suggested   the   use   of 

similarity indices for measuring beta diversity. Jansen and Vegelius [20] had earlier opined that, of the 

many   similarity   indices,   only   three   of   them   (the   Ochiai,   the   Jaccard   and   the   Sorensen)   are   worth 

considering.

Sorenson’s index is expressed as:

RI = 100 * a / a + b + c

Where:


a = number of species present in both sites under consideration

b = number of species present in Site 1 but absent in Site 2

c = number of species present in Site 2 but absent in Site 1    

Measurement of Correlation between Diversity of Fruit Trees and Diversity Frugivores

Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was used to examine the correlation between the diversity of fruit 

trees and frugivores. This was done using the PAlaeontological STatistics (PAST) software.  

RESULTS 

Fruit Tree Species Composition of Different Sites

The fruit tree species present at the various sites and the number of individuals encountered is presented 

in Table 1. The highest number of fruit tree species was encountered in MF (46), followed by Fragment A 

(24) while 21 species were encountered in each of fragments B and C. A total of 12 unknown fruit tree 

species were encountered with 6 occurring only in MF; 1 in each of fragments A and B; and 4 in fragment 

C. 


International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                    Page: 9 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

Table 1: Fruit Tree Species Composition of the enumerated sites and number of individuals 

encountered

Species

      MF

          A

          B

          C

Isolona deightonii

1

0



0

0

Anthocleista vogelii

1

1

1



1

Nuxia congesta

0

1



1

0

Maesa lanceolata

0

1

1



1

Rapanea melanophloeos

1

1



1

1

Voacanga bracteates

1

1

0



0

Tabernaemontana contorta

1

0



0

0

Rauvolfia vomitoria

0

1

1



0

Allophylus africanus

1

1



1

1

Deinbollia crossonephelis

1

0

0



0

Diospyros monbuttensis

1

0



0

0

Zanthoxylum leprieurii

1

0

0



0

Clausena anisata

1

1



1

1

Chrysophyllum albidum

1

0

0



0

Entandrophragma angolense

1

0



0

0

Carapa grandiflora

1

0

0



0

Synsepalum sp.

1

0



0

0

Pouteria altissima

1

0

0



0

Albizia gummifera

1

1



1

1

Newtonia buchananii

1

0

0



0

Dalbergia heudelotti

1

1



1

1

Anthonotha noldeae

1

0

0



0

Hannoa klaineana

1

0



0

0

Psychotria schweinfurthii

1

0

0



0

Celtis gomphophylla

1

0



0

0

Trema orientalis

1

1

1



1

Olax subscorpoidea

1

0



0

0

Chionanthus africanus

1

0

0



0

Santiria trimera

1

0



0

0

Garcinia smeathmannii

1

1

1



0

Psorospermum corymbiferum

1

1



1

1

Symphonia globulifera

1

0

0



0

Discoclaoxylon hexandrum

1

0



0

0

Bridelia micrantha

1

1

1



1

Croton macrostachyus

0

1



1

1

Polyscias fulva

1

1

1



0

Memecylon afzelii

0

1



0

0

Beilschmiedia mannii

1

0

0



0

Dombeya ledermannii

0

1



1

1

Syzygium guineense

0

1

1



1

Eugenia gilgii

0

1



1

0

Canthium vulgare

0

1

1



1

Rothmannia urcelliformis

1

0



0

0

Pavetta owariensis

1

0

0



0

Oxyanthus  speciosus

1

0



0

0

Trilepisium madagascariensis

1

0

0



0

Ficus sp.

1

1



1

1

Ritchiea albersii

1

0

0



0

Zymalos  monospora

1

0



0

0

Unknown sp.1

1

0

0



0

Unknown sp.2

1

0



0

0

Unknown sp.3

1

0

0



0

Unknown sp.4

1

0



0

0

Unknown sp.5

1

0

0



0

Unknown sp.6

1

0



0

0

Unknown sp.7

0

1

0



1

Unknown sp.8

0

1



1

1

Unknown sp.9

0

0

0



1

Unknown sp.10

0

0



0

1

Unknown sp.11

0

0

0



1

Unknown sp.12

0

0



0

1

International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences             Page: 10 



Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

Frugivore Species Composition of Different Sites

The frugivores present at the various sites and the number of individuals encountered is presented in 

Table   2   while   Table   3   shows   the   number   of   frugivorous   species   observed   within   each   of   the   five 

taxonomic groups at the different sites. The highest number of frugivorous species was encountered in 

MF (39), followed by each of Fragments A and B (26) while 25 species were encountered in C. Birds 

were   the   most   predominant   frugivorous   species   among   the   five   taxonomic   groups   with   29   species 

encountered in MF and 22 species in each of fragments A, B and C. 

Table 2: Frugivores at different sites and number of individuals encountered

Species

Family

 MF

 A

 B

 C

 Andropadus  tephrolaemus

Pycnonotidae

4

2



1

1

Andropadus gracilirostris

Pycnonotidae

3

0



0

0

Pycnonotus barbatus

Pycnonotidae

5

5



5

5

Chlorocichla simplex

Pycnonotidae

1

3



5

4

Francolinus bicalcaratus

Phasianidae

1

3



5

4

Treron calvus

Columbidae

4

1



1

3

Turtur tympanistria

Columbidae

2

1



1

1

Turtur afer

Columbidae

1

2



1

1

Columba sjostedti

Columbidae

4

2



1

1

 Streptopelia semitorquata



Columbidae

5

5



5

5

Streptopelia hypopyrrha

Columbidae

2

1



3

5

Gymnobucco calvus

Capitonidae

4

0



0

0

Lybius bidentatis

Capitonidae

5

5



5

5

Pogoniulus bilineatus

Capitonidae

5

0



0

0

 Buccanodon duchaillui



Capitonidae

4

0



0

0

Turdus pelios

Turdidae

3

2



5

5

Sylvia borin

Sylviidae

5

5



5

5

Phylloscopus trochilus

Sylviidae

5

5



5

5

 Corythaeola cristate



Musophagidae

1

0



0

0

Tauraco persa

Musophagidae

5

0



0

0

Tauraco leucolophus

Musophagidae

1

4



4

4

Crinifer piscator

Musophagidae

0

0



0

2

Bycanistes fistulator

Bucerotidae

5

0



0

0

Platysteira cyanea

Platysteiridae

4

2



1

1

Ploceus bannermani

Ploceidae

2

4



5

5

Ploceus baglafecht

Ploceidae

2

5



5

5

Ploceus nigricollis

Ploceidae

1

1



1

1

Linurgus olivaceus

Fringillidae

3

3



1

0

Zosterops senegalensis

Zosteropidae

1

3



1

1

Colius striatus

Coliidae

4

5



5

5

Cephalophus monticola

Antelopinae

2

0



0

0

 Cephalophus rufilatus

Antelopinae

1

1



1

1

Funisciurus anerythrus

Sciuridae

5

5



5

5

Tadarida spp

Pteropodidae

1

1



1

0

Papio Anubis

 Cercopithecinae

4

0



0

0

Cercopithecus nicitans

 Cercopithecinae

4

0



0

0

Cercopithecus aethiops

 Cercopithecinae

5

5



5

4

Cercopithecus mona

 Cercopithecinae

2

0



0

0

Colobus guereza

 Cercopithecinae

2

0



0

0

Pantroglodytes vellerosus

Hominidae

1

0



0

0

Table 3: Number of frugivore species observed within each of the five taxonomic groups at 



the different sites

Taxon


MF

A

B



C

Birds


29

22

22



22

Primates


6

1

1



1

Ungulates

2

1

1



1

Rodents


1

1

1



1

Bats


1

1

1



0

Total

39

26

26

25

International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                Page: 11 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                     IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490    

  

Similarity and Dissimilarity of Sites in terms of Fruit Tree Species Composition

The   similarity  or   otherwise   dissimilarity  in   fruit   tree   species   composition   between   each   pair   of   the 

enumerated sites is shown in Table 4. MF and fragment C are the most dissimilar, followed by MF & B 

and MF & A respectively. A total of 36, 34, and 33 fruit tree species found in MF were not found in 

fragments C, B, and A respectively. 13, 12, and 10 fruit tree species were common to MF & A, MF & B, 

and   MF   &   C   respectively.   Fragments   A   &   B   are   the   most   similar   in   terms   of   fruit   tree   species 

composition, followed by fragments B & C and fragments A & C respectively. A total of 21 fruit tree 

species were common to fragments A & B, while 17 species were common to fragments A & C, and 16 

common to fragments B & C.

Table 4: Sorensen’s similarity indices for fruit trees at different sites

MF

A



B

C

MF



*

22.81


21.82

17.54


A

22.81


*

87.50


60.71

B

21.82



87.50

*

61.54



C

17.54


60.71

61.54


*

Similarity and Dissimilarity of Sites in terms of Frugivorous Species Composition

The   similarity  or   otherwise   dissimilarity  in   frugivore   species   composition   between   each   pair   of   the 

enumerated sites is shown in Table 5. Frugivore species similarity was higher between the protected 

forest and each of the fragments, and between each pair of the fragments than that of the fruit trees in the 

respective sites. MF and fragment C are the most dissimilar, followed by both MF & A and MF & B. 13 

frugivore species found in MF were not found in fragments A and B, while 15 species found in MF were 

not found in fragment C. 26 frugivore species were common to MF & A and MF & B, while MF & C 

have 24 species in common. Fragments A & B are the most similar in terms of frugivores with all the 26 

species common to both sites. 24 frugivore species were common to both fragments A & C, and B & C.

Table 5: Sorensen’s similarity indices for frugivores at different sites

MF

A



B

C

MF



*

66.67


66.67

60.00


A

66.67


*

100.00


88.89

B

66.67



100.00

*

88.89



C

60.00


88.89

88.89


*

Diversity of Fruit Trees at different Sites

The alpha (within-site) diversity of fruit trees at different sites is shown in Table 6. Both Simpson and 

Shannon-Wiener diversity indices show that MF is the most diverse of all the sites, followed by fragment 

A while fragments B and C have the same diversity index. 



Table 6: Alpha diversity indices for fruit trees at different sites

Variable


MF

A

B



C

Simpson index (1-D)

0.9783

0.9583


0.9524

0.9524


Shannon-Wiener index

3.829


3.178

3.045


3.045

Species richness

46

24

21



21

International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences              Page:12 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

Diversity of Frugivores at different Sites

The alpha (within-site) diversity of frugivores at different sites is shown in Table 7. Both Simpson and 

Shannon-Wiener diversity indices show that MF is the most diverse of all the sites, followed by fragments 

A, C, and B respectively. 



Table 7: Alpha diversity of frugivores at different sites

Variable


MF

A

B



C

Simpson index (1-D)

0.9679

0.9514


0.9476

0.9490


Shannon-Wiener index

3.519


3.115

3.052


3.057

Species richness

39

26

26



25

Correlation between Diversity of Fruit Trees and Diversity of Frugivores

The correlation coefficient (r) for the diversity of fruit trees and the diversity of frugivores for all 

the   sites   was   0.987776   and   0.99678   for   Simpson   and   Shannon-Weiner   diversity   indices 

respectively.



DISCUSSIONS

The


 

highest number of fruit tree species - about double the number found in each of the fragments, was 

found in MF. More of the unknown fruit tree species were found in MF and fragment C which represent 

both extremes in terms of protection and exploitation respectively. This may be as a result of unhindered 

evolutionary processes in the main forest and disturbance-induced successional changes in fragment C. 

Both phenomena could alter the species composition of the forest ecosystem over time. 

The level of dissimilarity in fruit tree species composition was very high between the main forest on one 

hand and the fragmented forests on the other. This may be as a result of anthropogenic activities in the 

unprotected fragments. Habitat disturbance and alteration can lead to changes in species composition by 

inducing the germination of seeds of pioneer tree species in the soil seedbank. The highest dissimilarity in 

fruit tree species composition between the protected main forest and the least protected fragment C and 

the high level of similarity between each pair of the fragments, lends credence to this assertion.

The fruit tree diversity showed a declining trend from the main forest through fragment A to fragments B 

and C. The observed trend could be attributed to the differences in the level of protection being given to 

the   main   forest   and   the   fragmented   sites.   Anthropogenic   impacts   of   habitat   fragmentation   and/or 

degradation  causes   biodiversity  decay  worldwide.   Harris   and  Silva-Lopez   [10]   observed  that   habitat 

fragmentation   is   one   of   the   most   serious   causes   of   diminishing   biological   diversity,   while   its   main 

consequence – habitat loss- is responsible for biodiversity loss and ultimate extinction of species [19]. 

However, it should be noted that the level of disparity between the main forest and fragment C, in terms 

of the diversity of fruit tree species was relatively low when compared with the diversity of the entire tree 

species between the two sites as observed by Ihuma et al [18]. It seems that the rural dwellers spare the 

fruit trees in the course of exploitation of resources in the unprotected fragment C since the fruits are most 

likely to contribute to their livelihoods. 

Higher number and diversity of frugivores recorded in the main forest than each of the fragments is 

attributable to the higher number and diversity of fruit tree species found in the former. Most frugivorous 

animals rely heavily on fruits, particularly in the tropics [7]. In a number of fine-scale field studies, it has 

been shown that the richness of frugivorous animals is largely dependent on fruit availability [e.g. 11, 7, 

1].


 

One possible explanation for a positive relationship between food plant and animal species richness is 

that a greater number of plant species could potentially provide more niches for the coexistence of animal 

species (‘niche assembly hypothesis’; [17]). Perrins  et al.,  [25] equally asserted that the distribution of 

any species is restricted by the distribution of its habitat and within that habitat the availability of food 

and other resources. Our result also showed a very high correlation between the diversity of fruit trees and 

that of frugivores. 

International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                   Page: 13 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com


Ihuma et al                                                                                       IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490 

However, the higher similarity observed between the frugivores found in the main forest and each of the 

fragments than with fruit trees is attributable to the migratory nature of the frugivores especially the birds 

which accounted for over 70 per cent of the frugivorous species observed within the five taxonomic 

groups in all the sites.

CONCLUSIONS 

The diversity of fruit trees and that of frugivores were highly correlated. Both the number and diversity of 

fruit trees and frugivores were higher in the protected main forest than in all the forest fragments. Birds 

accounted for over 70 per cent of the frugivorous species observed within the five taxonomic groups in all 

the sites. Both the fruit trees and frugivore species composition varied more between the main forest and 

each of the fragments than between each pair of the fragments. However, the level of dissimilarity in 

species composition between the main forest and the fragments was more with the fruit trees than the 

frugivores.



REFERENCES

1.

Bleher, B, potgieter, C.J., Johnson, D.N. and Bohning-Gaese, K. 2003. The importance of figs for 



frugivores in a South African coastal forest. J. Trop. Ecol. 19: 375-386.

2. Borrow, N. and Demey R. 2004. Birds of Western Africa. Christopher Helm, London.

3. Chapman, J.D. and Chapman H.M. 2001. Forests of Taraba and Adamawa State, Nigeria.   An 

Ecological     Account   and   Plant   Species   Checklist.     Univ.   of   Canterbury   Christchurch,   New 

Zealand.

4. Dowsett- Lemaire, F. 1989. Physiography and Vegetation of the Highland Forests of   Eastern 

Nigeria. Tauraco Research Report 1

5. Dunn, A. 1993. A Preliminary Survey of the Forest Animals of Gashaka Gumti National Park, 

Nigeria.   Unpublished   Report   for   WWF   –UK   and   the   Conservation   Foundation   Contract 

Reference  NG0007 (4686).

6.

Fasola, T.R.; Ogunshe, A.A.O. and Onyeachuchim, H.D. 2004. Ethnobotanical importance of 



endangered species in the arid zones of Nigeria. Zonas Aridas No. 8.

7. Fleming,   T.H.,   Breitwisch,   R.   and   Whitesides,   G.H.   1987.   Patterns   of   tropical   vertebrate 

frugivore diversity. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 18: 91-109.

8.

Hall, J.B. 1970. Report on an Expedition to Sardauna Province, North – Eastern State 20



th   

March 


– 10

th

 April, 1970. Ife  University Herbarium Bulletin No 6.



9. Harper, J.L. 1977.  Population Biology of plants. Academic Press, London, UK. 

10.


Harris,   L.D.   and   Silva-Lopez   1992.   Forest   fragmentation   and   the   conservation   of   biological 

diversity, pp. 197-237. In: P.L. Fielder and S.K. Jain (eds.). Conservation Biology, The Theory 



and Practice of Nature Conservation, Preservation and Management. John Wiley, New York.

11.


Herrera, C.M. 1985. Habitat-consumer interactions in frugivorous birds. pp. 341-365, In: Cody, 

L. (Ed.). Habitat Selection in Birds. Academic Press, Orlando, FL.

12.

Howe, H.F. 1976. Ecology of seed-dispersal and waste of a neotropical seed-dispersal System. In 



Implications for seed dispersal by Animals for Tropical   Reserve Management.

 

Evolutionary 



Ecology84:261-281

13.


Howe, H.F. 1977. Bird activity and Seed dispersal of a tropical wet forest tree.   Ecology 58: 539– 

50.


14.

Howe, H.F. 1984. Implication of seed Dispersal by Animals for tropical reserve   Management. 



Ecology6: 262 – 279.

International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                 Page: 14 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com

Ihuma et al                                                                                     IJPAES     ISSN 2231- 4490    

    

15. Howe, H.F. 1986. In Seed dispersal by fruit – eating birds and mammals, pp.  123 – 190.  In: 

Murray, D.R. (ed.). Seed Dispersal.  Academic press, Sydney, Australia. 

16.


Howe, H.F., and J. Smallwood. 1982. Ecology of seed dispersal. Annual Review of. Ecology and 

Systematic 13: 201 – 228.

17.


Hutchinson, G.E. (1959). Homage to Santa Rosalia, or why are there so many kinds of animals? 

Am. Nat. 93: 145 159.

18.


Ihuma,  J.O.,  Chima,  U.D.,  and Chapman,  H.M. (2011).  Tree  species  diversity in a Nigerian 

montane forest ecosystem and adjacent fragmented forests. ARPN  Journal of Argicultural and 



Biological Science, 6(2): 17-22.

19. IUCN, 2002. Effective of human activities, causes of biodiversity loss (Online).  Available   by 

International   Union   for   Conservation   of   Nature   and   Natural   Resources. 

http://www.iucn.org/bil/habitat.html

20.

Jansen, S. and Vegelius, J. 1981. Measurement of ecological association. Oecologia 49:371– 376.



21.

Keay,   R.   W.   J.,   Onochie,   C.   F.   A.,   Standfield,   D.   P.   1964.  Nigerian   Trees  Vols.   1   &   2. 

Department of  Forestry Research, Ibadan. 

22.


McCockey, K.R. and Drake, D.R. 2002. Extinct pigeons and declining bat populations: are large 

seeds still being dispersed in the tropical pacific? pp. 381 – 395, In: Levey, D.J., Silva, W.R. and 

Galetti, M. (Eds.),  Seed Dispersal and Frugivory: Ecology, Evolution and Conservation.  CAB 

International, Wallingford.

23.

Newton,   A.C.   2007.  Forest   Ecology   and   Conservation:   A   Handbook   of   Techniques.   Oxford 



University Press, Oxford, 454pp.

24.


Ojo, L.O. 1996. Data collection and analysis for biodiversity conservation, pp. 142 – 162.  In: Ola 

-Adams, B.A. and Ojo, L.O. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Inception of a Training Workshop on 



Biosphere Reserves for Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development in Anglophone 

Africa (BRAAF): Assessment and Monitoring Techniques in Nigeria, 9- 11 January, 1996.

25.


Perrins, C.M.; Lebreton, J.D.; and Hirons, G.J.M. 1991.  Bird Population Studies: relevance to 

Conservation and Management. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. vii and 637.

26.


Schupp, E.W., and Fuentes M. 1995. Spatial patterns of seed dispersal and the unification of 

plants  population ecology. Exoscience 2: 267 – 275.

27.

Wang, B.C. and Smith, T.B. 2002. Closing the seed dispersal loop. Tree 17:379 -385.



28.

White, F. 1983. The Vegetation of Africa.  UNESCO, Paris. 356 pp.

29.

White,   L   and   Edwards,   A.   eds.   2000.  Conservation   Research   in   African   Rain   Forests:   A 



Technical Handbook. Wildlife Conservation Society, New York. 444pp.

30.


Wilson, M.F. 1992. The ecology of seed dispersal. Pages 61-85  in  M. Fenner , ed. Seed: the 

ecology of Regeneration in plant communities. CAB International Press, Cambridge, UK.



31.

Wolda, H. 1983. Diversity, diversity indices and tropical cockroaches. Oecologia 58: 290 – 298.



International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences                 Page: 15 

Available online at 

www.ijpaes.com


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə