Documentation, conservation and bioprospection- a priority agenda for action



Yüklə 339.21 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü339.21 Kb.
1   2   3   4

         The life support species which offer very valuable subsidiary food are also very numerous. Several 

wild plants are consumed as vegetables, as fruits or as seeds.  Only a few important ones are listed here. 



Alangium salviifolium,  Antidesma acidum, A. menasu,  Artocarpus sp.,  Baccaurea courtallensis, Calamus 

rotung, Canthium travancoricum, Emblica officinalis, Flacourtia indica, Mangifera indica, Dioscorea spp., 

Phoenix  humilis,  Physalis  spp.,  Rubus  spp.,  Syzygium  cuminii,  Caryota  urens and  several  Colocasia  and 

Alocasia  spp.  

 

 

ENDEMIC AND MONOTYPIC TAXA OF WESTERN GHATS 

          The issue of endemism in Western Ghats has been discussed by many botanists from time to 

time (Chatterjee, 1940, 1962;  Maheshwaari, 1976;  Nayar, 1980, 82;  Rao, 1972;  Subramanyam & 

Nayar,    1974;    Aahmedulla  &  Nayar,  1987;    Nair  &  Daniel,  1986;      Nayar  &  Ahmedulla,  1984;   

Ramesh  &  Pascal,  1981).  Western  Ghats  are  only  next  to  Himalaya  in  having  high  number  of 

endemic plants. Although Western Ghats are a part of the continental area, they are protected by 

vast sea along the western side, Vindhya and Satpura ranges on the northern side, semi-arid Deccan 

plateau on the eastern side and Indian Ocean on the south which act as barriers for plant migration 

and hence act as a kind of oceanic island in supporting a large number of endemic plants. According 

to Subramanyam & Nayar, 1974; Blasco, 1970, 1971, the high summits of Western Ghats with their 

characteristic  climate  are    comparable  to  islands  as  regards  the  distribution  of  endemic  species. 

According  to  Nayar  (1982)  there  are  56  (now 60)  endemic  genera  and 2100  (38  %)  species  in  the 

Peninsular India. Among these 49 genera are monotypic. Unlike Himalayas, most of the endemics in 

the  Western  Ghats  are  palaeo-endemics.  Southern  Western  Ghats,  particularly  Agastyamalai  hills 

are  the  richest in  endemics  followed by Wynad and  Annamalai hill  ranges  (Table -7).

 Further, an 

analysis of endemism in various taxa reveals that 

Poaceae  with  13 genera    and  155 species   is 

the  largest among   endemics.  The family  Orchidaceae    has  approximately  100  endemic  species  in 

Western  Ghats.  Aacanthaceae  with  8  genera  ((Kanjarum,  Carvia,  Gantelbua,  Nilgirianthus, 



Phlebophyllum,  Pleocaulus,  Taeniandra    and  Xenacanthus);    Asclepiadaceae  with  7  genera( 

Baeolepis, Decalepis, Frerea, Janakia, Oianthus, Seshagiria and  Utleria)  and 35 species  are other 

large  families  as  regards  endemic  plants  are  concerned.There  are  also  21  aroborescent  genera  

having more than 5 endemic species in Western Ghats (Table 1). Among the evergreen tree species 

ca. 352 species  ( 56 % of the total evergreen species) are reported to be endemic to  Western Ghats 

(Ramesh & Pascal, 1997). 

Table – 7:   Distribution of endemic species in Western Ghats 

Center/ Region 

Area (km2) 

Endemics 

Agasthyamalai 



2450 

189 

Anamalai high range 



8000 

94 

Palni hills 



2068 

43 

 

 



 

Wyanad – Kodagu 

12800 

150 

Shimoga – Kanara 

12000 


58 

Mahabaleshwar -Khandala 

11000 


63 

Konkan – Raigad 

20000 

50 


Marathwada – Satpuda 

100000 


27 

 

         Similarly, the large genus Crotalaria has ca.30 % of the species endemic to the region. Some of 



the other genera having high concentration of endemic species are Nilgirianthus  and  Phlebophyllum 

ca. 27 species;  Ceropegia 26 species ; Habenaria  17 species ; Isachne  14  species;    Dichanthium  11 

species.  Some of the arborescent endemic genera are BlepharistemmaErinocarpusMeteoromyrtus



Otonephelium,  Poeciloneuron,  Pseudoglochidion  (except  Poeciloneuron  all  other  genera  are 

monotypic).  Another  unique  feature  of  the  endemism  in  Western  Ghats  is  the  prevalence  of  high 

endemic species among arborescent genera (Table - 1  ). 

             Monotypic  genera  are  those  which  are  represented  by  only  one  species  having  no  closely 

related  genomes  anywhere  else  in  the  world  and  hence  have  conservation  significance.  There  are 

about 236 monotypic genera in India   of which   49 genera    are monotypic in Western Ghats.   Rana & 

Ranade  (  2009)  have  provided  a  detailed  account  of  monotypic  genera  in  India  and  according  them 

Poaceae  with  32    monotypic  genera  is  the  largest  family  in  India  followed  by  Leguminosae  (15 

monotypic  genera)  and    Asteraceae    (with  12  monotypic  genera)  in  Indian  flora.  A  few  important 

monotypic genera which are also endemics in Western Ghats are listed in Table  -8.  

Table – 8:  Some monotypic endemic genera in Western Ghats 

Acrotrema arnotttianum Wight 

Dilleniaceae 



Adenoon indicum Dalz. 

Asteraceae 



Chandrasekharaniakeralensis Nair,Ramachandran & 

Sree Kumar 

Poaceae 

Hubbardia heptaneuron Bor 

Poaceae 


 Indobanalia thyrsiflora (Moq.) Henry & B. Roy 

Amaranthaceae 



Indopoa paupercula (Stapf) Bor 

Poaceae 


Janakia arayalpathra Joseph & Chandrasekaran 

Asclepiadaceae 



Kanjarum palghatense Ramamurthy 

Acanthaceae 



Kingiodendron pinnatum (Roxb. ex Dc.) 

Leguminosae 



Kunstleria keralensis Mohanan & Nair 

“do” 


Lamprachaenium microcephalum (Dalz.)Benth. 

Asteraceae  



Limnopoa meeboldii (Fischer) Hubb. 

Poaceae 


Moullava spicata (Dalz.)Nicolson 

Leguminosae 



Nanothamnus sericeus Thoms. 

Asteraceae 



Otonephelium stipulaceum (Bedd.) Radlk. 

Sapindaceae 



Paracautleya bhatii R.M.Smith 

Zingiberaceae 



Polyzygus tuberosus Dalz.  

Apiaceae 



Proteroceras holtumii Joseph & Vajravelu 

Orchidaceae 



Pseudodichanthium serrafalcoides (Cooke & Stapf) Bor  Poaceae 

Santapaua madurensis  Balak. ex Subr. 

Acanthaceae 



Seshagiria sahyadrica Ansari & Hemadri 

Asclepiadaceae 



Silentvaleya nairii Nair & Bhargavan 

Poaceae 


Solenocarpus indica Wight & Arn

Anacardiaceae 



Trilobanche cookie (Stapf) Sch. ex Henr

Poaceae  



Triplopogon romasissimus (Hack.) Bor 

Poaceae  



 

DIVERSITY OF AQUATIC AND MARSH PLANTS 

The aquatic and marsh vegetation of  India  is quite  rich and diverse. Approximately the world’s half of 

the  aquatic  plants occur  in  Indian  region  and again more  than  50%  of  the  total  aquatic  flora  of  India 

occur in Western Ghat region. There are 10 dicootyledonous and 11 monocotyledonous purely aquatic 

families.  Podostemaceae,  Hydrocharitaceae  are  some  of  the  dominant  families.  A  number  of  aquatic 

plants  are  also  endemic,  of  which  Podostemaceae  with  about  20  species  tops  the  list(  Nagendran  & 

Arekal,1981).  There  are  various  forms  of      aquatic  plants  in  Western  Ghats  like  Free  floating  forms 

(Eichhornia  crassipes,  Pistia  stratiotes,  Spirodela  polyrrhiza,  Lemna  spp.,  and  Pteridophytes  like  Azolla 



pinnata, Salvinia spp., and some algal members), Rooted aquatics with their foliage floating(Nelumbo 

nucifera,  Nymphaea  nouchalii,  Nymphoides  indica),  Submerged  aquatics(  Vallisneria  spiralis,Ottelia 

alismoides,  Nechamandra  alternifolia,  Hydrilla  verticillata,  Najas  graminea,  Limnophila  indica, 

Potamogeton  pectinatus  and  Ceratophyllum  demersum)  Emergent  hydrophytes  (Scirpus maritimus,  S. 

articulatus,  Elaeocharis  palustris,  Phragmites  karka,  Sacciolepis  interrupta,  Lymnophyton  obtusifolium, 

Monochoria  vaginalis,  Sagittaria  spp.,Butomos  umbellatus,  Rorippa  nasturtium-aquaticum  and  a  few 

more). In addition to  trhe pure aquatic  plant  species,   there are diverse varieties of  marsh or  wetland 

plants, which are too numerous to list. 

 

 



BIOPROSPECTION AND HUMAN WELFARE 

    

The  bio  resources  of  Western  Ghats  are  is  quite  rich.  Almost  all  groups  of  economically  significant 

plants  grow  here  which  include numerous  life  saving  drug  plants,  nutraceuticals,  life  support  species, 

wild  aromatic  species,  ornamental  species,  metal  tolerant  species,  wild  genetic  resources  and  so  on. 

While many species await discoveries, the flora is getting depleted in an alarming rate. Therefore, not 

just  conservation  of  these bio-resources  in  the  region but  also  their  sustainable  utilization  for  human 

welfare  is  the  priority  agenda.  Today,  with  advancements  in  molecular  biology  and  biotechnology, 

Bioprospection  of  the  flora  for  better  genes,    better  molecules,  better  medicinal  plants  has    become  

easier  and  faster.  But  this  involves  the  active  collaboration of  field botanists,  taxonomists,  ecologists, 

molecular  biologists  and  biotechnologists,  which  unfortunately  almost  non  existent  in  India.  The 

prospects  for  Bioprospection  on  Western  Ghat  flora  is  quite  high.  The  enormous  florsitc  diversity, 

enormous habitat variation resulting in vast infra-specific  variation, chemo-prospecting in wild aromatic 

plants,  wild  food  plants,  Bioprospection  of  flora  for  better  genotypes  in  bio-fuel  plants  (Jatropha,  

CarallumaPongamiaBoswellia and many others. Bioprospection of the flora  for metal tolerant genes 

for environmental bioremediation - in members of Caryophyllaceae, Ceratophyllaceae, Portulaccaceae, 

Tamaricaceae, Salvadoraceae, Thymeleaceae and Fabaceae are certain challenging areas. Added to this, 

there  are  excellent  taxonomists  (who  can  scan  the  entire  biodiversity  and  short  list  species  for 

Bioprospection),  and  biotechnologists  with  excellent  laboratory  facilities  in      the  country.  What  is 

needed  is  the  actual  collaboration  and  joint  programames  on  Bioprospection  so  that  product 

development at global level (based on wild flora of Western Ghats) becomes a reality for the ultimate 

human welfare. 



Bioprospection in medicinal and aromatic plants 

 

Western  Ghats,  as  an  emporium  of  several  wild  aromatic  plant  species  with  an  enormous 



diversity in  them offers an immense scope  for  Bioprospection, particularly  chemo- prospecting in  wild 

aromatic  plants.  Some  short  listed    aromatic    species  like  Acronychia  pedunculata,  Chloroxylon 



swietenia,  Cymbopogon  flexuosus,  Blumea  lanceolaria,  Artemisia  nilagirica  var.  nilagirica,  Ocimum 

gratissimum, Curcuma pseudomontana,  Clausena dentata and Limonia  acidissima have already shown 

prospects for their development and popularization in the region. Although the quality and quantity of 

the required compounds is not satisfactory, the existing diversity can be used to improve and develop 

these crops. Molecular biologists,  Biotechnologists and  Geneticists  can also play a  lead role  in genetic 

improvement of some of these short listed species. There is also  an urgent need for bioprospection of  


medicinal flora of Western Ghats, particularly tree flora which to some extent  are neglected. There are 

ca.490 arborescent medicinal taxa in Western Ghats of which 308 (62.8%) are endemic  and medicinally 

important  for  various  diseases  from  cancer  to  rheumatism.  Intensive  phytochemical  screening  are 

essential for identifying active compounds from all populations within a taxa as tropical trees are well 

known for their variability.  Nothapodites foetida (Icacinaceae) – an evergreen tree of Western Ghats is 

found to contain camptothecine, an antileukaemia and antitumoral compound. Camptothecine (0.005%) 

was earlier  found  only in Camptotheca  acuminata (Nyssaceae) occuring in China, whereas  the  species 

from  Western  Ghats  contains  0.1%,  promising  for  treatment  of  cancer.  Ethnopharmacological  studies 

are also required for fully understanding their therapeutic value. 

 

MAJOR THREATS AND CONSERVATION OF DIVERSITY 

 

The  Western  Ghats  being  on  the  threshold  of  development  and  with  increased  population 



pressure has already lost much of its prime forests and unique habitats. The whole area has already 

been listed as one of the world’s ‘hottest hotspot’ areas (Myers, 1988, Myers et al., 2000 ).  There 

are several threats operating in the region, which have not only destroyed many unique habitats of 

flora but also favoring the spread of many invasive, alien species, which are further deteriorating the 

plant wealth of the region. In brief,   ever increasing population growth, selective removal of specific 

groups of plants, extensive practice of shifting agriculture by local people, extension of townships , 

road construction on Hills creating accessibility of remote areas,  degradation and fragmentation of 

forests  for  various plantation  crops  such  as   coffee,  fruits,  vegetables,  spices  (Pepper,  cardomum, 

nutmeg, areca nut, etc.), ‘modernisation’ leading to change of llife  style and cultural values of local 

tribals, free access and unregulated exploitation of bioresources  in  the region,   tourists  influx and 

their greed for collection of specific groups of ornamental plants (orchids,  begonias, Impatiens spp., 

etc.), dependence of plant based industries solely on wild resources of biodiversity, wrong policies 

of the government that allow unregulated export of timber, bamboos and   other  forest  products 

impoverishing  the  biodiversity  sink  of  the  region,  unplanned  economic  upliftment  of  the  people, 

spread  of  certain  alien  invasive  weeds  such  as  Eupatorium,  Mikania,  Parthenium  and  others 

endangering the native flora are some noticeable threats in Western Ghats.  Nearly 40 % of natural 

forest vegetation in Western Ghats has  disappeared during the past 8-10 decades ( Menon & Bawa, 

1997).Already  the  low elevation evergreen  forests  dominated by  Dipterocarpus spp. have become  



the  most  threatened  community.  (Pascal,  1982;  Ramesh  et.  Al.,  1997).    Similarly,  the  other  low 

elevation  species  like  Buchanania  barberi,  Cynometra  beddomei,  Dialium  travancoricum,  Hopea 



Jacobi,  Inga  cynometroides,  Syzygium  chavaran,  Buchnania  lanceolata  have  almost    reached  the 

stage  of  extinction.  As  a  consequence  of  the  deforestation,  many  groups  of  plants  (ornamental 

plants,  medicinal  plants(  table  10),  biologically  interesting  plants,  aromatic  species)  have  already 

become critically endangered or even presumed to be extinct ( Table -11)  and several species have 

not  been  recollected  after  their  Types  (  Table-12)    and  are  also  facing  the  threat  of  extinction.  

Aromatic    plant    species  like  Pogostemon  nilagiricus,    P.  travancoricus,  P.  wightii,    Plectranthus 



nilgherricus,  P.  wightii,  P.  walkeri,    Moonia  heterophylla,    Ocimum  adscendens,    Cinnamomum 

travancoricum and C. wightii, which were at one time abundant on the hill slopes  have now become 

scarce.    Further,  Infestation  of  alien  weeds  like  Parthenium  hysterophorus,  Mikania  micrantha, 



Eupatorium  odoratum,  Mimosa  invisa,  etc.,  have  taken  a  heavy  toll  of  native  and  naturalaized  

species  (Table  -9).      In  fact,    Invasive alien species are considered as  the  second  major  threat  to 

native  flora  only  after  habitat  destruction.  Extinction  of  local  populations  due  to  spread  of  alien 

weeds was recognized as early as 1872 by Darwin. Invasive aliens severely compete with native flora 

for space, light, nutrients and water. The density and competitive ability of weeds and native species 

play a crucial role in the outcome of competition between them. Although clear cut assessments on 

biodiversity erosion in native taxa are not available, the very presence of these invasive species over 

extensive  areas,  indicates  the  elimination  of  diversity  in  native  flora.  Again,  although  clear  cut 

species extinctions are not observed, fragmentation of native species/populations has pushed many 

native herbaceous species on road to extinction. Loss of species due to invasive weeds from an area 

can  attract  the  attention  of  botanists  but  loss of  genetic  variability  (due  to population  extinction) 

goes unnoticed,  which is  the  case in many native  flora.  Assessment of  such fragmented  species  in 

different biogeographic zones including Western Ghats is a challenging but priority agenda. Erosion 

of diversity  has been observed  in  several  taxa ( Table -9  ) since the introduction of Parthenium  in 

south  India  ,  at  a  time  when  Flora  of  Mysore  district  was    just  published  (Rao  &  Razi,  1981). 

Therefore, it  is  an urgent  task  to  initiate  collaborative  programmes aiming at  conservation of  the 

rich flora of Western Ghats. While in situ conservation of these species is partly taken care of by the 

establishment  of  several  protected  areas  like  the  Nilgiris  Biosphere  Reserve,  Agasthyamalai  

Biosphere Reserve, Kalakad-Mundandurai Tiger Reserve, Indra Gandhi  National Park,  Silent Valley 

National  Park,    Bandipur  National  Park,    Kudremukha  National  Park,    Nagarahole  National  Park, 

Giant  Squirrel  Wildlife  Sanctuary,    Idukki    Wildlife  Sanctuary,  Eravikulam  Wildlife  Sanctuary, 


Wayanad  Wildlife  Sanctuary,    Periyar  Wildlife  Sanctuary,  Parimbikulam  Wildlife  Sanctuary, 

Shendurney    Wildlife  Sanctuary,    Peppara    Wildlife  Sanctuary,  etc.,    many  species  out  side  the 

reserve do not find a place in any in situ programmes.  Even within the protected Biosphere Reserve 

areas there is a always a  severe threat by the invasive weeds.  Experience has shown that entry of 

even  one  single  invasive  species  can  eliminate  hundreds  of  local  species  in  just  a  short  period  of 

time.  Therefore,  regular  monitoring  of  the  population  of  these  species  is  necessary.  It  is  also 

advisable to identify certain pockets rich in aromatic species within the larger protected areas and 

give extra protection, so that these species are freely multiplied in nature. 



 Table -9:     Distribution of  native / naturalized species affected by invasive weeds 

Species  

 

Family 

Abutilon indicum 

Malvaceae 



Acalypha indica 

Euphorbiaceae 



Alternanthera echinata                         

Amaranthaceae 



Alysicarpus vaginalis                         

Papilionaceae 



Amaranthus spinosus 

Amaranthaceae 



Andrographis paniculata                         

Acanthaceae 



Anisomeles indica 

Lamiaceae 



Asystasia dalzelliana 

Acanthaceae 

Boerhaavia diffusa 

Nyctaginaceae 



Cassia occidentalis 

Caesalpiniaceae 



Chenopodium album 

Chenopodiaceae 



Indigofera cordifolia 

Papilionaceae 



Indigofera linifolia 

Papilionaceae 



Indigofera  trita 

Papilionaceae 



Chenopodium ambrosioides 

Chenopodiaceae 



Cleome viscosa 

Capparidaceae 



Convolvulus arvensis 

Convolvulaceae 



Corchorus tridens 

Tiliaceae 



Crotalaria medicaginea                             

Papilionaceae 



Croton bonplandianum    

Euphorbiaceae 



Cucumis callosus 

Cucurbitaceae 



Digera alternifolia 

Amaranthaceae 



Euphorbia hirta 

Euphorbiaceae 



Euphorbia orbiculata 

Euphorbiaceae 



Euphorbia prostrata 

Euphorbiaceae 



Evolvulus alsinoides 

Convolvulaceae 



Gomphrena serrata 

Amaranthaceae 



Hedyotis aspera 

Rubiaceae 



Hybanthus enneaspermus                               

Violaceae 



Tribulus terrestris 

Zygophyllaceae 



Polycarpon prostratum                                   

Caryophyllaceae 



Polygala chinensis 

Polygalaceae 



Portulacca oleracea 

Portulacaceae 



Rungia repens 

Acanthaceae 



Scoparia dulcis 

Scrophulariaceae 



Solanum nigrum 

Solanaceae 



Tephrosia purpurea 

Papilionaceae 



Trianthema portulacastrum     Aizoaceae 

Ipomoea muricata 

Convolvulaceae    



Mollugo cerviana 

Molluginaceae 



Physalis minima 

Solanaceae 



Polycarpaea corymbosa 

Caryophyllaceae 

 

 

 



 

Table  10:    Some Endemic and Endangered  medicinal plant  species of Western Ghats 



Trichopus zeylanicus  

                       Trichopodaceae  



Utleria salicifolia 

                         Periplocaceae  



Janakia arayalpathra                         Periplocaceae  

Myristica malabarica 

         

           Myristicaceae  

Adenia hondala  

      


          Passifloraceae  

Artocarpus hirsutus  

  

 



 Moraceae  

Cinnamomum travancoricum                    Lauraceae  

Cinnamomum wightii   

               Lauraceae  



Piper barberi    

 

               Piperaceae  



Vateria indica    

                   Dipterocarpaceae  



Ochreinauclea missionis  

              Rubiaceae  



Syzygium travancoricum  

              Myrtaceae 

 

 

 


1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə