Documentation, conservation and bioprospection- a priority agenda for action



Yüklə 339.21 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü339.21 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Table   11 :  Some extremely rare  taxa of Western Ghats (presumed to be extinct ?) 

Neuracanthus neesianus 

Acanthaceae 

N. Arcot dist., Tamil Nadu 

Bunium nothum  

Apiaceae 

Nilgiri hills; Sri Lanka 

Pimpinella pulneyensis  

Apiaceae 

Kodaikanal Sholas, T.N 


Ceropegia maculata 

Asclepiadaceae 

T. N; Kerala: Sri Lanka 

Oianthus deccanensis 

Asclepiadaceae 

Chatursringhi hills, Pune, Maharashtra 

Vernonia recurva 

Asteracea 

Annamalai hills, T. Nadu 

Impatiens anaimudica 

Balsaminaceae 

Anaimudi slopes, Idukki district, Kerala 

I. 


 johnii 

Balsaminaceae 

Kalar valley, Idukki dist., Kerala 

Ilex gardneriana 

Aquifoliaceae 

Nilgiri hills 

Begonia canarana  

Begoniaceae 

Western Ghats 

Salacia malabarica 

Elastraceae 

Coorg,  Karnataka  &  Travancore  hills, 

Kerala 


Euonymus serratifolius 

Celastraceae 

Annamalai & Nilgiri hills, T. N 

Dipcadi concanense 

Liliaceae 

South India 

Urginea poyphylla 

Lilliaceae 

Deccan peninsula 

Abutilon ranadei 

Malvaceae 

Ambaghat, Maharashtra 

Eugenia argentea 

Myrtaceae 

Wynad forest, Kerala 

E. singampattiana 

Myrtaceae  

Tirunelveli dist., T. N  

Syzygium bourdillonii 

Myrtaceae 

South India 

S. palaghatense 

Myrtaceae 

Palaghat hills, Kerala 

Anoectochilus rotundifolius 

Orchidaceae 

Madurai dist. T.N. 

Vanda wightii 

Orchidaceae 

Nilgiris hills, T.N  

Eragrostis rottleri 

Poaceae 


E. Coast of Tranquebar, S. India 

Eriochrysis rangacharii 

Poaceae 


Paikara in Nilgiri district, T. Nadu 

Hedyotis hirsutissim  

Rubiaceae 

Nilgiri dist. T.N  


Opercularia ocolytantha 

Rubiaceae 

Karnataka , Kerala 

Ophiorrhiza barnesii 

Rubiaceae 

Travancore, Kerala 

O. brunonis 

 Rubiaceae   

Hills of Kerala, T. N , Karnataka 

Ophiorrhiza radicans 

Rubiaceae 

Kerala: Sri Lanka 

Pavetta oblanceolata 

Rubiaceae 

Kerala 

P.wightii 

Rubiaceae 

Nilgiri hills, Coonoor, T.N  

Wendlandia angustifolia 

Rubiaceae 

Courtallum & Tirunelvelli, T.N  

Madhuca bourdillonii 

Sapotaceae 

Quilon dist., Kerala 

M. insignis 

Sapotaceae 

Mangalore, Karnatka 

Carex  christii 

Cyperaceae 

Nilgiri hills, T. N 

Isoetes dixitii 

Isoetaceae 

Maharashtra 

Isoetes sampathkumarnii 

Isoetaceae 

Karnataka  

Plectranthus bishopianus 

Lamiaceae 

Palni hills, T.N  

Ophiorrhiza  caudata 

Rubiaceae 

Kerala 

O.pykarensis 

Rubiaceae 

Nilgiri hills 

 

Table 12:     Some Western Ghats taxa not collected after their Types 



Species 

Family 

Locality 

Sageraea grandiflora 

Annonaceae 

Quilon, Kerala 1894. 

Vernonia multibracteata 

     “do” 

Idduki, Kerala, 1880. 


V. recurva 

     “do” 

Annamalai  hills,  Tamil  Nadu, 

1957 


Eugenia singampattiana 

Myrtaceae 

Tirunelvelli,  Tamil  Nadu,  1864-

74. 


Syzygium palghatense 

     “do” 

Palghat, Kerala 

Neuracanthus neesianus 

Acanthaceae 

N.Arcot, Tamil Nadu, 1850. 

Nothopegia aureo-fulva 

Anacardiaceae 

Tirunelveli hills, T. N 

Crotolaria fysonii 

Fabaceae 

Palani hills, Madurai, 1899 

Actinodaphne bourneae 

Lauraceae 

Pulneys, T.N., 1897 

Actinodaphne lanata 

      “do” 

Nilgiris , T. N. 1889 

Begonia anamalayana 

Begoniaceae 

Anamalai hills,  1864 

B. canarana 

      “do” 

Mangalore, 1851 

Neanotis carnosa 

Rubiaceae 

Kulhatti, Kadur, 1897 

Pavetta travancorica 

Rubiaceae 

Courtallum hills 

Eugenia argentea 

Myrtaceae 

Wynaad,1892 

Syzygium kanarensis 

      “do” 

N.Canara 

Memecylon sisparense 

Melastomataceae 

Sispara 

Euonymus serratifolius 

Celastraceae 

Wynaad,1864 

Salacia malabarica  

       “do” 

Travancore hills 

Ostodes integrifolius  

Euphorbiaceae 

Wynaad 

Humboldtia bourdilloni 

Fabaceae    

Kerala 

Dialium travancorium  

     “do” 

Ponmudi forest 

Phyllanthus megacarpa 

Euphorbiacea 

Nilgiri hills 

Syzygium courtallense 

Myrtaceae 

Courtallum hills 

Wendlandia angustifolia 

Rubiaceae 

Courtallum hills 


 

 

 



 

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Conservation  of      such  species  which  are  not  covered  by protected  areas  under  ex-situ  conditions,  in 



botanical  gardens  and  other  germplasm  preservation  centers  is  another  aspect  that  is  strongly 

recommended.  The  institutes  like  Central  Institute  of  Medicinal and  Aromatic  Plants,  Lucknow,  which 

primarily  deals  with  medicinal  and  aromatic  plants  has  already  several  collections  of  medicinal  and 

aromatic  species  in  their  gene  bank.  The  collections  should  be  further  strengthened.  The  author  at 

CIMAP  Resource  Centre  at  Bangalore  initiated  a  programme  of  introduction,  evaluation  and 

multiplication  of  as  many  medicinal  and  aromatic  species  of  Western  Ghats  as  possible.  So  far,  70 

species  are  being  grown  and  conserved  in  the  conservatory.  While  ex-situ  conservation  helps  in 

conservation of  the  selected  rare  and  endangered  species,  such  centers  also  provide  for  the  study  of 

their chemistry, reproductive biology, their agro technology and even multiplication. Constant supply of 

required quantity  of  material  for  evaluation  of  medicinal  and aromatic plants  is  also assured  through 

such germplasm conservation. The pharmaceutical industries and others dealing with the large scale use 

of medicinal and aromatic plants must also come forward to identify the locally available such species, 

introduce them in their collection centers and multiply them so that these are not only conserved, but 

 

 

 



Abutilon ransdei 

Malvaceae 

Ratnagiri,  

Achyranthus coynei 

Amaranthaceae 

Khandala  

Barleria gibsonioides 

Acanthaceae 

Maharashtra 

B. sepalosa 

“do” 


Concan  

Caralluma truncato-coronata 

Asclepiadaceae 

N. Canara 

Cryoptocoryne cognata 

Araceae 


Concan 

Cynoglossum ritchiei 

Boraginaceae 

Belgaum  

Dysophylla stocksii 

Lamiaceae 

Concan 

Leea talbotii 

Leeaceae 

Yellapur  & Karwar 

Neanotis ritchiei 

Rubiaceae 

Belgaum 

Maba micrantha 

Ebenaceae 

Western Ghats 

Viscum mysorense  

Loranthaceae 

Arasikere ( Karnataka) 


also  help  in  identifying  the  elite  populations  for  further  investigations  and  adopting  them  as  future 

aromatic crops.  

      India’s  efforts  towards conservation  of biodiversity    is  also  praiseworthy.  Among  the  several  steps 

taken  for  conservation  of  the  biodiversity,  the  following  are  important  (a)  India  is  a  signatory  to  all 

International  conventions  on  biodiversity  (b)  Biological  diversity  Bill  (2000)  and  National  and  State 

Biodiversity Boards for all states established (c)  Forty seven  plant species from India  are included in 

CITES  and  Scientific  and  Management  Authorities  designated  (d)  Under  Man  and  Biosphere  Reserve 

programme  15  Biosphere  Reserves  declared  (e)    Prepared  project  documents  for  all  Biosphere 

Reserves(f)  Eighty nine  National Parks, 496 Wildlife Sanctuaries, 27 Tiger Reserves, 25 Ramsar Sites, 17 

Wetlands  areas,  15  Mangrove  areas,  6  World  Heritage  Sites  and  4  Coral  Reef  areas  declared    (g) 

Establishment  of  National  Gene  banks  at  different  places  (h)  Publications  of  Red  Data  Books  by  the 

Botanical  Survey  of  India  under  the  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Forests  (i)  Funding  research 

programmes through DBT, DST and Ministry of Environment and Forests aiming at conservation of rare 

species and their habitat recovery (j) Financial support for establishment of Botanic Gardens and ex situ 

conservatories  for  rare  and  endangered  species  by  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Forests.    Recently 

efforts are also on to declare the whole of Western Ghats as a World heritage site. As many as 39 sites 

scattered in States of Karnataka, Kerala and  Tamil Nadu in the Western Ghats are in the UNESCO list of 

natural world heritage sites and the author hopes that the tag of world heritage site attached to these 

hills certainly  helps in in situ conservation of the flora  and fauna of the region. 

 

SOME URGENT TASK FOR FUTURE 

Studies on assessment of the floristic diversity in the country are still incomplete. It is said that nearly 

30% of the country still remains under explored.  There is an urgent need to systematically survey and 

document  all  the  economically  important  species  in  the  wild  for  future  bioprospection  work. 

Taxonomists  and  Ecologists  should  take  up  studies  on  assessment  of  infra  specific  variations  in  wild 

species  and  develop  databases.  Bioprospection  of  the  medicinal  and  aromatic  species  involving 

Taxonomists,  Ecologists,  Phytochemists,  Molecular  biologists,  Geneticists,  Plant  Breeders  is  also 

strongly  recommended.  As  the  flora  is  fast  dwindling  due  to  several  anthropogenic  factors,  priority 

must  be  attached  to  the  study  of  all  wild  flora.    As  a  first  step  in  this  direction,  it  is  necessary  to 

establish a chain of conservatories of wild plants, particularly of rare, endangered, endemic and other 

economically important species. The author strongly urges to develop coordinated programmes on all 



major groups for stock taking and identifying gaps, avoiding duplication of efforts, develop expertise for 

all groups through training programmes, strengthen biodiversity collection centers (herbaria), identify 

areas needing further exploration and attempt once for all  following co-ordiantated multidisciplinary 

programmes,  attempt  assessment  of    infra-specific  diversity  in  at  least    few  economically  important 

species,  develop  consolidated  National  Biodiversity  database  and  distribution  maps  for  all  species  

under central supervision with networking of information among different regional centers. However, 

the constraints in this direction are also too many, such as, lack of much required cooperation between 

Taxonomists  and  Phytochemists,  biotechnologists;  dearth  of  required  number of  good  taxonomists  / 

field  botanists,  vast  array  of  flora  with  enormous  infra-specific  variation  in  taxa  spread  over  vast 

extension of  the  geographical  boundaries  of  Western  Ghats,  incomplete  knowledge  of  our  flora  and 

huge  cost involved  in bioprospection work, etc.  are  some  constraints. Serious and meaningful efforts 

should  be  initiated  to  overcome  these  constraints.  Complete  inventorization  of  flora  (including  infra 

specific diversity), training and generation of devoted field botanists and taxonomists, close interaction 

of  taxonomists    with  phytochemists,  biotechnologists  for  successful  bioprospection  programmes  are 

certain priority agenda suggested with regard to the development of  wild plant resources of Western 

Ghats. 


CONCLUDING REMARKS

 

Western Ghats region is very rich in biological resources, which have not been satisfactorily documented 



and  utilized.  The  opportunities  for  inventorization  and    bioprospection  of  our  flora  though  limitless, 

several constraints like lack of trained field botanists/ ethno-botanists, lack of much needed cooperation 

between  field  botanists  and  biotechnologists,  apathy  towards  field  oriented  studies  have become  the 

limiting  factors.  There  is  an  urgent  need  to  generate  adequate  number  of  taxonomists  and  field 

botanists  who  have  become  endangered.  The  limited  number  of  existing  agriculture  crops  may  not 

sustain  the  ever  increasing  population  in  the  coming  decades  and  therefore  search  for 

alternate/additional crops is a must. Documentation of all life support species and life saving species in 

different  zones  of  the  country  and  their  utilization  can  certainly  help  in  our  fight  against  hunger  and 

ailments  in  coming  years.  Therefore  serious  efforts  are  needed  to  initiate  truly  collaborative 

programmes  involving  taxonomists  and  biotechnologists  for  Bioprospection  of  our  resources  and 

product development.  Conservation of our biological resources is another challenging task needing the 

attention  of  all  biological  scientists.    The  National  Biodiversity  strategy  and  Action  Plan  (Singh,  2002) 

rightly summarizes the course of action to be pursued for conservation of the rich flora of India.  These 


are outlined below which should also apply to the conservation of the rich floristic diversity of Western 

Ghats      i.  Strengthening  and  increasing  the  effectiveness  of  present  Protected  Areas        ii.    Survey, 

catalogue  and  study  the  threatened  ecosystems  and  develop  conservation  strategies,  iii.  Identify  and 

map  large  forest  fragments  and  develop  methodology  for  management  of  biodiversity      iv.    Identify, 

catalogue and study the hyper-diversity areas and develop strategies for their conservation   v.  Identify 

over exploited species and reduce anthropogenic pressure by cultivating them   vi.  Develop strategies 

that  involve  indigenous  people  and  in  benefit  sharing  vii.  Develop  regional  and  national  biodiversity 

database     viii.    Incorporate biodiversity concerns in Environmental Impact  Assessments  and in Forest 

Working Plans   ix.  Identify and map grassland/savanna areas and develop management strategies   x.   

Mount a multi-tier education system for public awareness. Lastly establishment of ex-situ conservatories 

and wilderness  areas in every village, town, schools and colleges to accommodate the unique flora of 

Western Ghats is strongly advocated for which liberal government subsidies be  made available. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The author is thankful to Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi for the award of INSA 

Honorary Scientist position. 

 

 



REFERENCES: 

Ahmedullah, M. & M.P. Nayar, 1987. Endemic plants of Indian region,  Vol. 1, Peninsular India.  

Botanical Survey of India,  Calcutta. 

Ahuja, B.S. & K.P. Singh. 1963. Ecological Studies on the humid tropics of Western Ghats, India. 



Proc. Nat. Acad. Sc.  32B: 77-84 

Ansari, M.Y. 1984. Asclepiadaceae – Genus  CeropegiaFasc. Fl. India 16: 1-34. 

 

Blasco, F. 1970. Aspects of the flora and ecology of the Savannas of the south  Indian Hills.  J. Bombay 



Nat. Hist. Soc. 67: 522-534. 

Blasco, F. 1971. Montagnes du sud deI’nde: forets ,savanes, ecologie. Inst, Fr. Pondicherry, Trv , Sec.Sci. 

tech.Tome vol. X pp436 

Chandrabose  M ,  N.C. Nair & C. Chandrasekharan.  1988. Flora of Coimbatore.  Bishen Singh Mahendra 

Pal Singh, Dehra Dun. 

Chatterjee, D.1940.   Studies on the endemic flora of India and Burma  .  J. Asiat.  Soc.  Bengal    5: 19-67. 



Chatterjee, D. 1962.  Floristic pattern in  Indian vegetation.    Proc.  Summer  School  Botany, Darjeeling, 

pp 32-42. New Delhi. 

Cooke, T. 1908. Flora of Presidency of Bombay, Govt. of India 

Fyson, P.F. 1932.  The Flora of South Indian Hill stations. Madras  Govt. Press , 2 vols. 

Gamble, J.S. (&C.E.C. Fischer) 1915-36. Flora of the Presidency of Madras,  Adlard & Son Ltd. London. 

Kammathy, R.V. 1983.  Rare and  endemic species of Indian Commelinaceae, in   Eds.  Jain, S.K. &  R. R. 

Rao.  An Assessment of Threatened plants of India,  Botanical  Survey of India, Howrah: pp213-221. 

Keshava Murthy, K.R. &   S.N. Yoganarasimhan. 1990. The Flora of Coorg (Kodagu), Karnataka, India. 

Vimsat Publishers,  Bangalore. 

Krishnamoorthy, K. 1960.  Myristica  swamps  in the evergreen forests of Travancore: in Tropical moist 



evergreen forest symposium.  FRI,   Dehra Dun. 

Manilal, K.S.  1988. Flora of Silent Valley tropical rain forest of India.  Department of  Science  & 

Technology, Calicut. 

Manilal, K.S.  1995. Biodiversity of Silent Valley and efforts for the conservation of Tropical Rain Forests 

of India. In (Ed)  A. K. Pandey    ‘Taxonomy and Biodiversity’.   CBS   Publishers  & Distributors, New Delhi. 

Mathew, K. M.  1981-84. The Flora of Tamil Nadu Carnatic,   3 vols. Rapinat Herbarium, Tiruchirapalli. 

Mehrotra,  A.  &   S.K. Jain. 1982. Endemism in Indian grasses – tribe Andropogoneae. Bull. Bot.  Surv.  

India 22: 51-58 

Menon, S. & K. S.  Bawa.  1997. Application of geographic information systems, remote sensing and a 

landscape  ecology approach to biodiversity conservation in Western Ghats.   Curr.  Sci. 73(2): 134-145. 

Mohanan ,M. & M. Sivadasan. 2002. Flora of Agasthyamala,   BSI, Calcutta 

Mohanan, M & A.N. Henry .  1994.  Flora  of  Thiruvananthapuram  District  BSI, Calcutta. 

Myers, N.1988( and 1990) Threatened Biotas: hot spots in tropical forestsThe Environmentalist  8: 1-20;  

10: 243 256. 1990. 

Myers, N., R. A. Mittermeier,  C. G. Mittermeier,  G.A.B. Fonesca,  &  J. Kents. 2000. Biodiversity hotspots 

for conservation  priorities.   Nature   403:  853-858. 

Nagendran, C.R. &G.D. Arekal. 1981. Studies on Indian Podostemaceae. Bull. Bot. Surv. India   23: 228-

238. 

Nair, N.C. &  Henry, A.N.  1983. Flora of Tamil Nadu, India, series 1: Analysis.  Botanical Survey of India, 



Coimbatore,  

Nair, N.C.  and P. Daniel. 1986. Floristic diversity of the Western Ghats and its conservation: a review. 

Proc Indian Acad. Sci. Suppl. 127-163 

Nayar, M.P.1982. Endemic flora of peninsular India and its significance   Bull. Bot. Surv. India  22: 12-23. 

Nayar, M.P.1980. Endesim and patterns of distribution of endemic   genera .  J. Econ.Taxon. Bot.1: 99-

110. 


Nayar, M.P. 1996. Hot spots of endemic  plants  of India, Nepal and Bhutan. TBGRI,  

Thiruvananthapuram. 

Pascal,  J.P.  1982.  Forest map of south India – sheet: Mercara-Mysore. Published by Karnataka & Kerala 

forest Departments and the French Institute, Pondicherry 

Pascal, J.P. 1991. Floristic composition and distribution of Evergreen  forests in the Western Ghats, India. 

Paalaeobotanist 39: 110-126. 

Prakash, V. &   S.K.Jain.  1979.  Poaceae : Tribe –Garnotieae. Fasc. Fl. India 14: 1-42. 

Ramaswamy S.N., M.  Radhakrishana  Rao  & D.A.  Govindappa  2001.  Flora of Shimoga District, 

Karnataka, Prasaranga , University of Mysore. 

Ramesh, B.R. & J.P. Pascal. 1997. Atlas of the endemics of the Western Ghats (India): Distribution of tree 



species in the evergreen and semi evergreen forests. Institue Francais de Pondichery, Publications du 

department d  ecologie vol.38, pp403. 

Ramesh, B.R.  De Franceschi, D & J.P. Pascal. 1997. Forest map of south India – sheet Tirulelveli

Published by Kerala and Tamil Nadu Forest Departments & French Institute , Pondicherry. 

Rana, T.S. &  S.A. Ranade   2009.  The enigma of monotypic taxa and their  taxonomic  implications.   

Curr.  Sc. 96(2): 219-229. 

Ramachandran, V.S. & V.J. Nair. 1988. Flora of Cannanore District, Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta. 

Rao, C.K. 1972.  Angiosperm  genera  endemic to Indian floristic and its neighbouring areas.   Indian   For.  

98:560-566.  

Rao, R. R. 1973. Studies on Flowering plants of Mysore District, 2 vols. Ph.D. Thesis submitted to Mysore 

University . 

Rao, R. R.  1984. Biodiversity in India: floristic aspects. Bishen Singh & Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra Dun. 

Rao, R. R.  &  Razi,   B.A. 1981. A  Synoptic Flora  of Mysore District.  Today   & Tomorrows Publishers, 

New Delhi. 


R.R. Rao R. Murugan  K.V. Syamasundar and B. Srinivasalu.  2006.  Western Ghats, - A major Emporium 

of wild Aromatic Plants: Diversity, Conservation and Bioprospection. In: N.P. Todaria, B.P. Chamola and 

D.S. Chauhan (Eds.).  Concepts  in Forestry Research PP. 267-278.  

Rau, M.A. & B.M. Narayana.1985.  A review of the tribe Vernonieae  (Asteraceae) in south India.    Bull. 



Bot. Surv. India 25: 19-25. 

Saldanha, C.J. 1984.  The Flora of Karnataka,  Oxford  & IBH Publishing Co. Pvt.  Ltd. New Delhi. 

Saldanha, C.  J .  & Nicolson, D.H. 1976. Flora of Hassan District, Karnataka, India,  Amerind  publishers, 

New Delhi. 

Santapau, H. 1951.  Acanthaceae  of  Bombay,   Bot.  Mem. Univ. Bombay, No.2: 1-104. 

Sharma, B.D., Singh, N.P., Raghavan, R.S. &   U. R. Deshpande 1984. Flora of Karnataka :  Analysis

Botanical Survey of India, Howrah. 

Singh, J.S. ((Co-Ordinator) 2002.  National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan ( Natural Terrestrial          



Ecosystems) – a report submitted to Ministry of Environment and Forests, New Delhi. 

Singh, N.P. D.K. Singh, P.K. Haajra & B.D. Sharma. 2000. Flora of India (Introductory Vol., Part II) 

Botanical Survey of India, Kolkata

 

Subramanyam, K. and Nayar, M.P. 1974. Vegetation and Phytogeography of the Western Ghats; in Ed. 

M.S. Mani ,Ecology and biogeography in India, the Hague, Dr. W. Junk publishers 

Yoganarasimhan, S.N. 1996. Medicinal Plants of India,  Vol. 1, Karnataka. Interline publishing, Bangalore, 

Dehra Dun, Michigan. 

Yoganarasimhan, S.N. 2000.  Medicinal  Plants  of India, Vol .2, Tamil Nadu, R. R. I,   Bangalore 

Yoganarasimhan, S.N., Subramanyam, K  &  Razi, B.A. 1981. Flora of Chickamagalur District,   Karnataka

India,   International Book Distributors, Dehra Dun. 



                                                             

 
1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə