Download by: [santhosh kumar ettickal sukumaran] Date



Yüklə 68.62 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü68.62 Kb.

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=tweb20



Download by: [SANTHOSH KUMAR ETTICKAL SUKUMARAN]

Date: 12 October 2015, At: 08:40

Webbia

Journal of Plant Taxonomy and Geography

ISSN: 0083-7792 (Print) 2169-4060 (Online) Journal homepage: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tweb20

Notes on Eugenia gracilis, Eugenia mooniana and

Eugenia phillyreoides (Myrtaceae)

E.S. Santhosh Kumar, J.F. Veldkamp & S.M. Shareef

To cite this article: E.S. Santhosh Kumar, J.F. Veldkamp & S.M. Shareef (2014) Notes on Eugenia

gracilis, Eugenia mooniana and Eugenia phillyreoides (Myrtaceae), Webbia, 69:1, 101-103, DOI:

10.1080/00837792.2014.895890

To link to this article:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00837792.2014.895890

Published online: 25 Jul 2014.

Submit your article to this journal 

Article views: 60

View related articles 

View Crossmark data



Notes on Eugenia gracilis, Eugenia mooniana and Eugenia phillyreoides (Myrtaceae)

E.S. Santhosh Kumar

a

*

, J.F. Veldkamp



b

and S.M. Shareef

a

a

Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Thiruvananthapuram, India;



b

National Herbarium of The

Netherlands - Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands

(Received 7 November 2013;

final version received 18 February 2014)

Notes on the taxonomy and nomenclatural status of Eugenia gracilis O. Berg, Eugenia gracilis Bedd., Eugenia mooni-

ana Gardner, Eugenia mooniana Wight and Eugenia phillyreoides Trimen (Myrtaceae) are provided. The new name

Eugenia anamalaiensis is proposed for E. gracilis Bedd. from the Anamalai Hills, Kerala, India.

Keywords: Anamalai; Eugenia; India; Kerala; Myrtaceae; nomenclature; taxonomy

Introduction

During the ongoing systematic study of Eugenia L.

(Myrtaceae) in the southern Western Ghats, India, we

came across taxonomic and nomenclatural problems

involving Eugenia gracilis Bedd. and Eugenia mooniana

Wight versus Eugenia phillyreoides Trimen. Based on

literature, herbarium material and

field studies, the

authors ESSK and SMS were able to con

firm the

differences between these species (Table



1

). JFV was

able to provide some information on literature and

nomenclature.

Eugenia gracilis

Beddome (

1864

) proposed Eugenia gracilis based on his



own collection from the

“Anamalay Hills” in Kerala.

Duthie (

1879


) regarded it as a variety of E. mooniana

Wight, and so Jackson (

1895

) cited the combination as a



mere synonym, giving

“1864” as the publication date.

Yet, for reasons that are not clear, many later publica-

tions cited the publication date as

“1854”. This error has

had nomenclatural and taxonomic consequences.

Unknown to Beddome, O. Berg (

1857


) had already

published the name Eugenia gracilis from Brazil. Berg

’s

name was listed by Jackson (



1895

), but without citing

the publication date. Misled by the misreported publica-

tion date, Sobral et al. (

2010

) proposed a new name,



Eugenia neogracilis Mazine & Sobral, for what they

thought was Berg

’s later homonym. It is therefore a

super


fluous name, as Turner (

2012


) recently pointed out.

They also thought that the type specimen collected by

Sellow possibly deposited in the Botanischer Garten und

Botanisches Museum Berlin-Dahlem, Berlin, Germany

(B) was probably destroyed during World War II and

hence they proposed a neotype, Demuner 500 [Museu de

Biologia Mello Leitão (MBML), Brazil]. However,

Sellow was a professional collector and there are numer-

ous duplicates in at least 40 other institutes (Vegter

1986


). Although we failed to

find one in a number of

virtual herbaria, this neotypi

fication is to be studied

again.

Eugenia gracilis O. Berg, Linnaea 27: 149. 1856



(nomen); in Mart., Fl. Bras. 14, 1: 222. 1857, non Bedd.

(1864)


Eugenia neogracilis Mazine & Sobral, Phytotaxa 8: 53.

2010, nom. super

fl. – Type: Sellow s.n. (B, holo, lost),

Brazil, São Paulo. Neotype: Demuner 500 (MBML),

Brazil, Espirito Santo, Santa Teresa, Oedra da Onça, des-

ignated by Sobral et al. (

2010

).

Since E. gracilis Bedd. is a later homonym of



E. gracilis O. Berg, a new name is proposed here:

E. anamalaiensis after the Anamalai Hills, Kerala, where

the species occurs.

It is apparently a rare species mainly known from

the type material in the Natural History Museum, Lon-

don (BM) and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (K)

and an additional more recent collection in Tropical

Botanic Garden and Research Institute (TBGT) Kerala,

India. In the

field it is often found in the evergreen for-

ests between 900

–1400 m elevation, but generally has

escaped detection by plant hunters or has been reported

in local


floras. The description available for this

species is scanty and so a detailed description is pro-

vided here based on a recent collection (S.M. Shareef,

72461).


Eugenia anamalaiensis E.S.S. Kumar, Veldk. & Shareef,

nom. nov.

Eugenia gracilis Bedd., Madras J. Lit. Sci. III, 1: 46.

1864; Trans. Linn. Soc. 25: 217. 1865; non E. gracilis

O. Berg (

1856


)

Eugenia mooniana Wight var. gracilis (Bedd.) Duthie in

Hook. f., Fl. Brit. India 2: 505. 1879

*Corresponding author. Email:

santhoshkumares@gmail.com

© 2014 Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Firenze

Webbia: Journal of Plant Taxonomy and Geography, 2014

Vol. 69, No. 1, 101

–103, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00837792.2014.895890

Downloaded by [SANTHOSH KUMAR ETTICKAL SUKUMARAN] at 08:40 12 October 2015 



Eugenia cotinifolia Jacq. var. gracilis (Duthie) M.R.

Almeida, Fl. Maharashtra 2: 265. 1988.

– Type:

Beddome s.n. (BM, holo; iso K 000821521), India, Ker-



ala, Anamalai Hills.

Description

Large shrubs or small trees, to 6 m tall, branchlets pale

brown, terete; young shoots puberulous. Leaves lanceolate,

7.5

–14 × 2.3–4.5 cm, attenuate to cuneate at base and acu-



minate to caudate

–acuminate at apex, glabrous and shin-

ing above, pale beneath; midrib channelled above, lateral

nerves c.22 pairs, obscure, intramarginal nerves two-tiered,

obscurely looped; main nerve c.1 mm from margin; petiole

0.5


–0.8 cm long, glabrous, drying black, channelled above.

Flowers white, axillary, solitary or from short peduncles,

which are axillary or supra-axillary rarely terminal or lat-

eral; pedicels 1.2

–3 cm long, slender, puberulous, terete.

Calyx campanulate, 2

–3.5 mm long; lobes 4, deltoid,

2.5 × 1.7 mm puberulous, ciliate, bracts 2, at base of calyx.

Petals 4, ovate-elliptic, 4

–5 × 2.5–3 mm, ciliate, twice as

long as the lobes of calyx. Ovary two-celled, ovules 6

–9.


Fruits oblong, rarely globose, to 2.5 × 1.5 cm, with persis-

tent calyx lobes, crimson on ripening, Seed 1

–2.

Flowering and fruiting



October

–February

Specimens examined

India: Kerala, Anamalai Hills, Beddome s.n.; Idukki dis-

trict, Kadalar, 28 November 2012, S.M. Shareef, 72461,

(TBGT).


Eugenia mooniana

Eugenia mooniana Wight (

1841

,

1842



) was based on

collections by Alexander Moon (Moon s.n., BM) from

Sri Lanka and Wight

’s own from South India (Wight KD

1851, K). The Illustrations of Indian botany were

published in two series of fascicles between 1831

–1833

and 1840


–1850. Therefore some have cited the whole

collection by the date of the last issue, 1850, e.g.

Alston

(1931: 119)



, Ashton (

1981


), and Sobral (

1995


).

As with E. gracilis we have here a case of homon-

ymy. Another E. mooniana was described by Gardner

(

1843



) based on a collection by Mrs Moon from Rio de

Janeiro, Brazil [Gardner 416, holo BM, iso Field

Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, USA(F), Con-

servatoire et Jardin botaniques de la Ville de Genève,

Geneva, Switzerland (G), University of Michigan, MI,

USA (MICH), New York Botanical Garden, NY, USA

(NY)]. Sobral (

1995


) proposed a new name for this later

homonym: E. neomooniana. According to The Plant List

(2013), E. mooniana Gardner and E. neomooniana are

synonyms of E. subundulata Kiaersk. var. subundulata.

Misled by the erroneous publication date of 1850,

Ashton (


1981

) regarded Wight

’s name as a later

homonym and used the next oldest synonym, E.ugenia

thwaitesii Duthie (

1879


: 506). This was followed by

many later workers (Kostermanns 1981: 174; Nair and

Henry

1983


; Manilal

1988


; Sasidhran and Sivarajan

1996


; Mohanan and Sivadasan

2002


; Nayar et al.

2006


).

Ashton (


1981

) designated CP 365 (CP = Ceylon

Plants) (PDA, K) from Sri Lanka, Kandy Distr.,

Madamhanuwara, as the neotype (

‘type’), not specifying

where the actual (holo)type is deposited. However, this

Sri Lanka collection was not part of the original material

so this typi

fication is to be rejected. The correct neotype

as designated here is Wight KD 1851.

Eugenia mooniana has been regarded as a synonym

of E. phillyreoides Trimen, e.g. by Alston (

1931: 119

),

followed by Veldkamp (



2013

). However, we prefer to

treat them as different species (Table

1

).



Eugenia mooniana Wight, Illus. Ind. Bot. 2: 13. 1841;

Icon. Pl. Ind. Or. 2: (4), t. 551. 1842

Type: Wight KD 1851 (K!, lectotype here): Wight KD 1851

(K), India, Tamil Nadu, Courtallum, Shevagherry hills,

Aug 1836. (Named after Alexander Moon, Sri Lanka).

Table 1.


The distinction between Eugenia anamalaiensis, Eugenia phillyreoides and Eugenia mooniana are tabulated below.

Characters

E. anamalaiensis

E. mooniana

E. phillyreoides

Habit


Small trees or large shrubs, to 6 m tall

Shrubs to 4 m tall

Shrubs to 4 m tall

Young


shoots

Puberulous

Glabrous

Scanty appressed silky white

trichomes

Leaves


7.5

–10 × 2.5–4 cm, lanceolate, acuminate

at both ends

4

–6 × 2–3 cm, ovate, tapering at base,



acuminate at apex

2

–2.5 × 0.8–1.2 cm, linear-



lanceolate, tapering at both ends

Flowers


Solitary or from short peduncles which

are axillary or supra-axillary

Solitary or paired, rarely in terminal

clusters or in short racemes

Axillary, solitary, pedicellate

Pedicels


2.5

–3 cm long, puberulous

0.6

–0.9 cm long, glabrous



1.2

–1.8 cm long, puberulous

Fruits

Obloid, 2



–2.5 × 1.5 cm

Globose, c. 1.25 cm in diameter

Depressed-globose, 1

–1.5 cm in

diameter

102


E.S. Santhosh Kumar et al.

Downloaded by [SANTHOSH KUMAR ETTICKAL SUKUMARAN] at 08:40 12 October 2015 



Eugenia mooniana Gardner, London J. Bot. 2: 352.

1843, non Wight

1841

.

Eugenia neomooniana Sobral, Napaea 11: 36. 1995.



Type: Gardner 416 [BM, holo; Royal Botanical Garden,

Edinburgh, UK (E), F, G, MICH, NY], Brazil, Pernam-

bouc et serrados orgaõs. (Named after a Mrs Moon, Rio

de Janeiro. Her name is not mentioned on the labels

seen). Some labels have 1837, others 1838 as the year of

collection, but from Gardner

’s words there can only be

the single gathering made by Mrs Moon.

Eugenia phillyreoides Trimen

Eugenia phillyreoides Trimen, J. Bot. 23: 207. Jul 1885;

Syst. Cat. Ceylon: 33. Jun / Jul 1885, nom. nud.; Handb.

Fl. Ceylon 2: 183. 1894, descr.; Kosterm., Quart. J.

Taiwan Mus. 34(3

–4): 169. Dec 1981.

Syzygium phillyreoides (Trimen) Santapau, Kew Bull.

[3]: 276. 1948.

Eugenia cotinifolia Jacq. subsp. phillyreoides (Trimen)

P.S. Ashton in Dassan., Rev. Handb. Fl. Ceylon 2: 413.

1981 (


‘phyllyraeoides’) – Type: Anon. s.n., May 1884,

Sri Lanka, summit of Kalupahane Kande [only known

from

a

single



collection:

Royal


Botanic

Gardens,


Peradeniya, Sri Lanka (PDA), holo, designated here; K,

Nationaal

Herbarium

Nederland,

Leiden

University



branch, Leiden, the Netherlands (L)].

Notes


Kostermanns (

1981


, p. 165) said that this is a species

entirely different from Eugenia hypoleuca Thwaites ex

Kosterm., and more similar to Eugenia mandugodaense

Kosterm. and Eugenia willdenowii DC.

There have been some alternative orthographies of

the epithet. The original one is

‘phillyreoides’, but

‘phillyraeoides’ and ‘phyllyraeoides’ are also found. As

it is derived from Phillyrea L. (Oleaceae) the correct

orthography seems to be

‘phillyreoides’ [Rec. 60G.1(1)

and (2)].

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the Director, JNTBGRI, for the

provision of facilities and to Dr K.N. Gandhi (GH) for useful

discussions. Two anonymous reviewers greatly contributed to

the improvement of the manuscript.

References

Almeida MR. 1988. Flora of Maharashtra 2. Mumbai: Blatter

Herbarium.

Alston AHG. 1931. Supplement. In: Trimen H, editor. A hand-

book to the Flora of Ceylon. Part. VI. Supplement: 119.

London: Dulau & Co; 119.

Alston AHG. 1931. In: Trimen H, editor. A hand-book to the

Flora of Ceylon. Part. VI. Supplement: 119. London: Dulau

& Co.


Ashton PS. 1981. Myrtaceae. In: Dassanayake MD, Fosberg

FR, editors. A revised handbook to the

flora of Ceylon 2.

New Delhi: Amerind Publishing Co.; p. 415

–416.

Beddome RH. 1864. Contributions to the botany of Southern



India. Madras J Lit Sci III. 1:46.

Beddome RH. 1865. A list of exogenous plants found in the

Anamallay Mountains, in Southern India, with descriptions

of new species. Trans Linn Soc London 25: 217. [full pagi-

nation: 209

–225].


Berg OC. 1856. Revisio Myrtacearum Americae huc usque

cognitarum s. Klotzschii

“Flora Americae aequinoctalis”

exhibens Myrtaceas. Linnaea 27: 149, 326. [full pagination:

1

–472].


Berg OC. 1857. Myrtaceae. In: Martius KFP Von, editor. Flora

brasiliensis 14. München: Wolf & Son.

Duthie JF. 1879. Myrtaceae. In: Hooker JD editor. The

flora of


British India 2. L. Reeve & Co.: London; p. 505

–506.


Gardner G. 1843. Flora of Brazil. Part II. London J Bot. 2:352.

Jackson BD. 1895. Index kewensis. Oxford: Clarendon Press;

p. 907

–909.


Kostermanns AJGH. 1981. Eugenia, Syzygium and Cleistocalyx

(Myrtaceae) in Ceylon, a monographical revision. Quart J

Taiwan Mus. 34:169:174.

Manilal KS. 1988. Flora of Silent Valley, Tropical Rain Forests

of India. Govt of India: Department of Science & Technol-

ogy.


Mohanan N, Sivadasan M. 2002. Flora of Agasthyamala.

DehraDun: Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh.

Nair NC, Henry AN. 1983. Flora of Tamil Nadu, India, Series

1: Analysis 1. Coimbatore: Botanical Survey of India.

Nayar TS, Rasiya B, Mohanan N, Raj Kumar G. 2006. Flower-

ing plants of Kerala

– A handbook. Thiruvananthapuram:

Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute; p. 133.

Sasidhran N, Sivarajan VV. 1996. Flowering Plants of Thrissur

forests. Jodhpur: Scienti

fic Publishers.

Sobral M. 1995. Uma nova combinação e onze nomes novos

em Eugenia (Myrtaceae) do Brasil. Napaea. 11:35

–36.


Sobral S, Costa Souza M, Mazine-Capelo F, Lucas E. 2010.

Nomenclatural notes on Brazilian Myrtaceae. Phytotaxa.

8:51

–58.


The Plant List Version 1.1. [Internet], 2013. Available from

http://www.theplantlist.org/

Turner IM. 2012. The angiosperm taxa of R.H. Beddome with

notes on the dates of publication of two serially published

works. Ann Bot Fennici 49:295.

Vegter IH. 1986. Index herbariorum: a guide to the location

and contents of the world

’s public herbaria. Part 2(6). Col-

lectors S. Regnum Veg. 114:873.

Veldkamp JF. 2013. Nomenclatural notes on Eugenia rein-

wardtiana (Myrtaceae) and more or less associated names.

Gard Bull Singapore. 65:125.

Wight R. 1841. Illustrations of Indian botany. 2. Madras:

Pharoah.


Wight R. 1842. Icones plantarum Indiae orientalis 2. Madras:

Pharoah.


Webbia: Journal of Plant Taxonomy and Geography

103


Downloaded by [SANTHOSH KUMAR ETTICKAL SUKUMARAN] at 08:40 12 October 2015 

Document Outline

  • Abstract
  •  Introduction
  •  Eugenia gracilis
  •  Eugenia mooniana
    •  Notes
  • Acknowledgements
  • References


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə