Draft banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain – Draft description and threats



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1 The term ‘woodland’ has been chosen as the most appropriate term, but the ecological community (or some examples of it) may be considered by some to be a shrubland. The structure and appearance may also vary due to disturbance history. Similarly, component species of the dominant upper sclerophyllous layer may be variously considered ‘tall or large shrubs’ or ‘small trees’. Some areas would also be considered forest under some existing classification systems.

2 The Swan Coastal Plain Bioregion is comprised of the Dandaragan Plateau (SWA1) and Perth (SWA2) subregions. Adjacent areas on the Whicher and Darling escarpments are within the Northern Jarrah Forest (JAF01) and Southern Jarrah Forest (JAF02) subregions. IBRA relates to the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia v7 (2012).

Banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain

Draft description and threats - Page


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