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6.4. The rest of the lightstation (GBRMPA property)




Element

History

Description and condition

Significance

2 Engine room
pmk_20120524_9260_engineroom
pmk_20120524_9261_engineroom
1956_qa11840_cropped

(Source: AMSA, drawing no. QA11840)



Built at some time in the 1930s or 1940s to house a diesel electric lighting plant for lighting the cottages.


Later adapted by successive replacement of the generator sets.
In 1999 the two generator sets in the building were installed. These are not associated with use of the site by lightkeepers.

Timber-framed, gable roofed, single room building on concrete slab on ground. Roof sheeted with Super Six asbestos-cement, with matching accessory ridge, gable and vent pieces. Walls sheeted with flat asbestos-cement.


Timber awning casement windows; timber framed and sheeted doors.
The building does not contain any major equipment from the manned lightstation period, but does contain small remnants from that period.
There is a corrugated iron rainwater tank, on a timber stand, against the northern wall of the building.
One of the generator sets is in working order, the other is unserviceable following fire damage.
The building is in generally sound condition.



Moderately significant for these reasons:


The engine room demonstrates the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the provision of electricity for radio operation and the keepers’ domestic purposes (criterion a).
Provision of domestic electric lighting for lightkeepers’ quarters was a typical feature of lightstations from about the 1930s (criterion d).

3 Winch house
pmk_20120524_9268_winchhouse
pmk_20060908_8285_winchhouse



Built in the late 1950s. In service until the lightstation was de-manned in 1987.



Timber-framed, skillion roofed, single room building on suspended reinforced concrete slab floor. Roof sheeted with Super Six asbestos-cement, with matching accessory barge pieces. Walls sheeted with hardwood weather-boards.


Timber casement windows, and solid timber doors and hatches.
Inside the building is a reel winch driven by a small diesel engine, set up to control both the lifting line on the crane, and the trolley hauling line.
The building is in a deteriorated condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The winch house and its equipment demonstrates the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the work of transferring fuel, equipment and stores from boats (criterion a).
The winch house and its associated components are typical elements of lightstations on elevated sites serviced from the sea (criterion d).

4 Derrick crane
pmk_20120524_9268_winchhouse



Built in the late 1950s. In service until the lightstation was de-manned in 1987.



Slewing derrick crane with tubular steel jib, post and legs, arranged to lift a load from a small boat brought up to the cliff below, and to lift it on to the landing platform or boat platform. The lifting line is operated by the reel winch in the winch house, and the jib is slewed by hand.


The crane is in a deteriorated condition.



Highly significant for these reasons:


The crane and its equipment demonstrates the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the work of transferring fuel, equipment and stores from boats (criterion a).
The crane is a rare surviving example of a lightstation crane (criterion b).
The crane is a typical element of lightstations on elevated sites serviced from the sea (criterion d).

5 Landing platform
pmk_20120524_9233_platform


Built in the late 1950s. In service until the lightstation was de-manned in 1987.



Reinforced concrete floor slab. One section is supported on the ground and fill; the rest is suspended and supported on concrete posts.


The platform is in a seriously deteriorated and dangerous condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The landing platform demonstrates the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the work of transferring fuel, equipment and stores from boats (criterion a).
The landing platform is a typical element of lightstations on elevated sites serviced from the sea (criterion d).

6 Boat platform and access ladder
pmk_20060908_8285_boatplatform


Built in the late 1950s. In service until the lightstation was de-manned in 1987.


Steel and timber cradle to support a small boat midway between the sea and the landing platform.


The platform and ladder are in a deteriorated condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The boat platform and ladder demonstrate the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the work of handling small boats that were part of the equipment of lightstations (criterion a).
The boat platform and ladder are typical elements of lightstations on elevated sites serviced from the sea (criterion d).

7 Cottage 1
pmk_20120524_9242_cottage1

Built in the late 1950s and completed by around 1960.


Maintained, with minor modifications, during its service as lightkeepers’ quarters until the station was de-manned in 1987.
Refurbished by the private lessee during the 2000s and currently occupied by staff of the private lessee.

Timber-framed detached house built on two levels stepping down the slope, connected with a single flight internal stair.


Walls sheeted externally with hardwood weatherboards, internally with hardboard.

Roofed with Super-Six asbestos-cement sheeting.


Timber double-hung window sashes with external hinged timber cyclone shutters.
The building is in generally sound condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The cottage demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements to the keepers’ living conditions made in the 1950s (criterion a).

The cottage is a characteristic element of lightstations (criterion d).



8 Workshop, store, and radio room
pmk_20120524_9238_workshop


Built in the late 1950s as workshop and store.


Used as a radio room.
Refurbished by the private lessee during the 2000s and currently used by staff of the private lessee.

Timber-framed building on concrete slab on ground.


Walls sheeted inside and out with flat asbestos-cement.

Roofed with Super-Six asbestos-cement sheeting.


Glass louvre windows, and timber framed and sheeted doors.
The building is in generally sound condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The workshop building demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements in radio communication made in the 1950s (criterion a).

The workshop is a characteristic element of lightstations (criterion d).



9 Cottage 2
pmk_20120524_9275_cottage2



Built in the late 1950s and completed by around 1960.


Maintained, with minor modifications, during its service as lightkeepers’ quarters until the station was de-manned in 1987.
Refurbished by the private lessee during the 2000s and currently occupied by staff of the private lessee.

Timber-framed detached single-storey house.


Walls sheeted externally with hardwood weatherboards, internally with hardboard.

Roofed with Super-Six asbestos-cement sheeting.


Timber double-hung window sashes with external hinged timber cyclone shutters.
The building is in generally sound condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The cottage demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements to the keepers’ living conditions made in the 1950s (criterion a).

The cottage is a characteristic element of lightstations (criterion d).



10 Septic pits and absorption trench

Built in the late 1950s and completed by around 1960.


Currently servicing the two cottages.

Underground concrete pits, pipework and transpiration trenches — two sets, one connected to each cottage.


In serviceable condition.

Moderately significant for this reason:


The installation demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements to the keepers’ living conditions made in the 1950s (criterion a).

11 Concrete water tank
pmk_20120524_9247_concretetank


Built in the late 1950s and completed by around 1960, to collect and store rainwater from the roofs of the buildings.


Refurbished with painted waterproofing membrane in 2010.
Asbestos-cement roof sheeting replaced with steel in 2010.
Currently servicing the two cottages.

Rectangular tank with floor and walls of reinforced concrete cast in situ.


Corrugated steel skillion roof on timber frame.
The tank is in generally sound condition.


Moderately significant for these reasons:


The tank demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements to the keepers’ living conditions made in the 1950s (criterion a).

12 Tramline, trolley and cables
pmk_20120524_9267_trolley
pmk_20120524_9296_blocks


Built in the late 1950s. In service until the lightstation was de-manned in 1987.


Straight run of tramline, inclined over most of its length, with a level section at the top. A wire hauling rope runs on two sets of steel rollers — one set between the rails, and one outside.


The trolley runs on two pairs of wheels, and has a flat timber tray.
The system is generally complete and in sound condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The tramline and its equipment demonstrates the development and operation of the lightstation, particularly the work of transferring fuel, equipment and stores from boats (criterion a).
The tramline and its associated components are typical elements of lightstations on elevated sites serviced from the sea (criterion d).

13 Metal water tank and stand
pmk_20120524_9294_tankstand

Built around 1960 as a header tank to supply rainwater pumped up from the concrete tank.
No longer in service.

Standard type galvanised steel lattice tank stand, supporting a corrugated steel tank.
The stability of the structure has not been assessed.

Moderately significant for these reasons:
The tank demonstrates the development of the lightstation, particularly the improvements to the keepers’ living conditions made in the 1950s (criterion a).

14 Paths, stairs and bridges
1957_qc12950_paths

(Source: AMSA, drawing no. QC12950)



pmk_20120524_9252_paths

Paths laid out and paved at various times since 1879.


Most of the paths, stairs and bridges date from the late 1950s, but the path and stairs leading down on to the boat landing are older.
The timber bridges were replaced in 2010.

A series of walkways and stairs of concrete cast in situ.


The timber bridges are replacements of structures dating from c. 1960.
The paths, stairs and bridges are in sound condition, but do not all comply with current standards for width, stair dimensions, or grade.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The paths, stairs and bridges demonstrate the development and pattern of use of the lightstation, particularly the arrangements for moving around the site and handling stores before the tramway was built (criterion a).

The arrangement of paths is a characteristic element of lightstations (criterion d).



15 Polyethylene water tank
dsc00336

New tank installed in 2010.


Cylindrical polyethylene tank, capacity about 5000 L, on a ground level pad.


The tank is filled by pumping water from the concrete tank, and supplies water to the two cottages.

Not significant.


This is a standard modern type of water tank.

16 Graves
pmk_20120524_9251_graves

One grave is marked for Carrie Biss (three-year-old daughter of lightkeeper Edwin Biss) who died in 1888.


The other grave is unmarked.

Carrie Biss’s grave has a surround of wrought iron pickets and rails with cast iron finials. The burial details are on a marble plaque with inset lead lettering. The plaque and iron surround are in stable condition apart from minor rusting of the iron.


The unmarked grave is of timber, with sawn hardwood posts, rails and pickets. The posts have rotted bases and mortises; the rails have rotted tenons. The structure is in a deteriorated and unstable condition.

Highly significant for these reasons:


The graves demonstrate the isolated life (and death) of lightkeepers and their families in the nineteenth century (criterion a).

The graves contribute to the aesthetic value of the lighthouse (criterion e).



17 Lightstation grounds
pmk_20120524_9241_grounds

The site was cleared when the lightstation was established in 1879, and successive lightkeepers have maintained the grounds and introduced plants.


Generally sloping ground with close-cut grass, informal plantings of garden shrubs, palms and trees.


The grounds are well tended and maintained.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The grounds form an essential part of the lightstation and demonstrate the modification and civilisation of the site by the lightkeepers (criterion a).

Carefully tended grounds are characteristic features of manned lightstations (criterion d).


The grounds contribute to the aesthetic value of the lightstation (criterion e)

18 Boulders


Boulders are natural features of the hill slopes.


Geotechnical consultants have carried out annual inspections since 2000 to monitor the boulders and assess the risk of them becoming dislodged and rolling down the hill and causing damage.
Stabilisation works were completed in 2006 and annual monitoring continues.

Boulders as plotted on Figure — Plan showing the location of boulders.


The condition of the boulders is believed to be stable, but continues to be monitored.

Moderately significant for this reason:


The boulders are a characteristic feature of the landscape setting of the lightstation (criterion e).

19 Access road
pmk_20120524_9287_road

New road built in 2009 giving access to the lightstation from the network of roads built as part of the golf course development.



Concrete surfaced roadway.


The road is in a stable condition.

Not significant, and intrusive.


The access road is a visually intrusive feature whose impact could potentially be reduced by landscape modifications.

20 Spa bath and roof
pmk_20120524_9271_spa

Spa bath and shelter roof were installed after 1999 on the concrete floor slab of a previous (lightstation) outbuilding.



Timber gabled roof supported on timber corner posts, covering a standard spa bath.


The structure is in a stable condition.

Not significant, and intrusive.


The spa bath and roof reduce the aesthetic values of the grounds, and have the potential to confuse the evidence of the way of life of the lightkeepers.
The remnant concrete floor is of moderate significance because of its evidence of previous use (criterion a).













21 Fowl house
pmk_20120524_9226_fowlhouse

Date of construction not known, but probably in the 1950s or 1960s.



Small shelter with walls sheeted with flat asbestos-cement and roofed with Super-Six corrugated asbestos-cement sheeting.


The shelter encloses one side of a yard of wire mesh supported on galvanised pipe posts.
The structure is in a stable condition.

Moderately significant for these reasons:


The fowl house demonstrates the self-sufficiency of the lightkeepers who lived in circumstances where some local production was needed to ensure a supply of fresh food (criterion a).

The fowl house is a characteristic element of manned lightstations (criterion d).



Images in table by Peter Marquis-Kyle unless otherwise stated
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