E-issn: 2278-4136 p-issn



Yüklə 99.02 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü99.02 Kb.

 

~ 40 ~ 


 Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry 2015; 4(2): 40-43

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

E-ISSN: 2278-4136 

P-ISSN: 2349-8234 

 

JPP 2015; 4(2): 40-43 



 

Received: 20-04-2015 

 

Accepted: 24-05-2015 



 

Geedhu Daniel 

PhD Scholar, Department of 

Biochemistry, Kongunadu Arts 

and Science College, Coimbatore-

641029, Tamilnadu, India. 

 

S. Krishnakumari 

Associate Professor in 

Biochemistry, Department of 

Biochemistry Kongunadu Arts 

and Science College, Coimbatore-

641029, Tamilnadu, India. 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence

S. Krishnakumari 

Associate Professor in 

Biochemistry, Department of 

Biochemistry Kongunadu Arts 

and Science College, Coimbatore-

641029, Tamilnadu, India. 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Quantitative analysis of selected primary metabolites in 

aqueous hot extract of Eugenia uniflora (L.) leaves 

 

Geedhu Daniel, S. Krishnakumari  

 

Abstract

 

Purpose  of  present  study  was to  evaluate  the  presence  of  selected  primary  metabolites  in  aqueous  hot 



extract of Eugenia uniflora leaves. Primary metabolites like lipids and amino acids were estimated using 

standard procedures. Quantitative analysis is very essential for identifying the compounds present in the 

medicinal plants. The results obtained from the present study provides evidence that aqueous hot extract 

of  Eugenia  uniflora  leaves contains  various  primary  metabolites and  this  justifies  the  use  of this  plant 

species as traditional medicine for treatment of various diseases. The results are very much encouraging 

but scientific validation is necessary before being put into practice. 



 

Keywords: Primary metabolites, Lipids, Amino acids, Aqueous extract, Eugenia uniflora. 

 

1. Introduction 

Plants  have  been  an  integral  part  of  traditional  medicine  across  the  continents  since  time 

immemorial.  Medicinal  plants  have  their  values  in  the  substances  present  in  various  plant 

tissues  with  specific  physiological  action  in  human  body.  Many  of  the  plant  species  that 

provide  medicinal  herbs  have  been  scientifically  evaluated  for  their  possible  medicinal 

applications.  India is  endowed  with a rich  wealth of  medicinal plants.  India recognizes  more 

than  2500  plant  species  which  have  medicinal  values 

[1]


.  Plants  are  like  natural  laboratories 

where a great number of chemicals are biosynthesized and in fact they may be considered the 

most important source of chemical compounds. 

The  identification  of  plants  is  useful  to  human  beings  from  natural  strands  commenced  in 

prehistoric studies. Experiments and trails are the two main ways through which humans have 

learnt  various uses  of the  plants 

[2]

.  In recent times, focus  on plant research has increased  all 



over  the  world  and  a  large  body  of  evidence  has  collected  to  show  immense  potential  of 

medicinal  plants  used  in  various  traditional  systems.  More  than  13,000  plants  have  been 

studied  during  the  last  5  year  period 

[3]


.  Over  three-quarters  of  the  world  population  relies 

mainly on plants and plant extracts for health care. 

According  to  the  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  (FAO),  more  than  50,000  plant  species 

are used in the traditional folk medicine throughout the world 

[4]

. The drugs are derived from 



the whole plant or from different parts like leaves, stem, bark, root, flower, tuber and seed etc. 

More  than  30%  of  the  entire  plant  species,  at  one  time  or  other  was  used  for  medicinal 

purposes. It has been estimated that in developed countries such as United States, plant drugs 

constitute as  much as 25%  of  the  total drugs, while in fast developing country such as  India, 

the contribution is as much as 80% 

[5]


Since  ancient  times,  people  have  been  exploring  the  nature  particularly  medicinal  plants  in 

search of new drugs. Medicinal plants are used by 80% of the world population for their basic 

health  needs.  India  is  the  birth  place  of  renewed  system  of  indigenous  medicines  such  as 

Siddha,  Ayurveda  and  Unani.  Traditional  systems  of  medicines  are  prepared  from  a  single 

plant  or  combinations  of  more  than  one  plant.  This  efficacy  depends  upon  the  current 

knowledge  about  taxonomic  features  of  plant  species,  plant  parts  and  biological  property  of 

medicinal  plants  which  in  turn  depends  upon  the  occurrence  of  primary  and  secondary 

metabolites 

[7]


Plant  synthesizes  a  wide  range  of  chemical  compounds  which  are  classified  based  on  their 

chemical  class,  biosynthetic  origin  and  functional  groups  into  primary  and  secondary 

metabolites.  Primary  metabolites  directly  involved  in  growth  and  development  while 

secondary  metabolites  are  not  involved  directly  and  they  have  been  worked  as  biocatalysts. 

Primary metabolites are widely distributed in nature, occurring in one form or another in 



 

41



 ~ 

Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

virtually all organisms. They are like chlorophyll, amino acids, 



nucleotides,  carbohydrates  etc.,  which  have  a  key  role  in 

metabolic  processes  such  as  photosynthesis,  respiration  and 

nutrient assimilation. They are used as industrial raw materials 

and food additives. 



Eugenia  uniflora  L.  is  a  widely  distributed  tree  in  South 

American countries, mainly in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and 

Paraguay 

[8]


.  Its  leaves  are  used  in  popular  medicine  as 

infusion  in  the  treatment  of  fever,  rheumatism,  stomach 

diseases, disorders of  the digestive tract, hypertension,  yellow 

fever, and gout. It may also reduce weight, blood pressure, and 

serve  as  a  diuretic 

[9]


.  Pitanga  fruits,  also  known  as  Brazilian 

cherry or Suriname cherry, contain various volatile compounds 

that are also found in the essential oil of pitanga leaves 

[10,  11]

Like the leaves, pitanga fruits may also have health benefits. In 



the  Brazilian  food  industry,  pitanga  fruits  have  mostly  been 

used  to  produce  juice  and  frozen  pulp.  Pulp  production  has 

high  economic  potential  because  the  product  has  consumer 

appeal  and  high  concentrations  of  antioxidant  compounds, 

such as anthocyanins, flavonols, and carotenoids 

[12]


Plants  produce  the  majority  of  the  world's  lipids,  and  most 

animals, including humans, depend  on these lipids  as  a  major 

source  of  calories  and  essential  fatty  acids.  Like  other 

eukaryotes,  plants  require  lipids  for  membrane  biogenesis,  as 

signal  molecules,  and  as  a  form  of  stored  carbon  and  energy. 

In  addition,  soft  tissues  and  bark  each  have  distinctive 

protective  lipids  that  help  prevent  desiccation  and  infection. 

Plant  lipids  also  have  a  substantial  impact  on  the  world 

economy and human nutrition. More than three-quarters of the 

edible  and  industrial  oils  marketed  annually  are  derived  from 

seed  and  fruit  triacylglycerols.  These  figures  are  particularly 

impressive given that, on a whole organism basis, plants store 

more carbon as carbohydrate than as lipid. Since plants are not 

mobile,  and  since  photosynthesis  provides  fixed  carbon  on  a 

regular  basis,  plant  requirements  for  storage  lipid  as  an 

efficient, light weight energy reserve are less acute than those 

of animals. 

The amino acids have several roles in plants, for example they 

act as osmolytes, detoxify heavy metals, regulate ion transport, 

stomatal  opening,  affect  synthesis  and  activity  of  enzymes, 

gene expression and redox homeostasis 

[13]

. Positively charged 



polyamines  are  involved  in  the  stress  response  through  their 

interaction  with the negatively charged  macromolecules, such 

as  DNA,  RNA,  proteins  and  phospholipids,  resulting  changes 

in  the  physical  and  chemical  properties  of  the  membranes,  in 

the structure  of nucleic acids and in the  enzyme activities 

[14]


In  addition,  polyamines  are  able  to  detoxify  the  reactive 

oxygen species accumulating during abiotic stress. 

Considering the potential pharmacological benefits of Eugenia 



uniflora,  the  aim  of  the  study  was  to  quantitatively  estimate 

primary metabolites like lipids and amino acids in aqueous hot 

extract of Eugenia uniflora leaves. 

 

Materials and Methods 



Plant material 

Fresh  leaves  of  Eugenia  uniflora  (Linn),  Family-  Myrtaceae, 

were  collected  from  Wayanad  district,  Kerala  during  the 

month  of  April  2014.  Taxonomic  authentication  was  done  by 

Dr.  V.S  Ramachandran,  Taxonomist,  Department  of  Botany, 

Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamil nadu, India. 

 

Sample Processing 

The leaves were washed, shade dried at room temperature and 

powered in a mixer grinder. 

Hot  Water  Decoction:  10g  of  the  powdered  sample  was 

dissolved in 100ml of distilled water which was boiled for one 

and half hours  and  filtered. The decoction was stored  at 4  °C 

for further usage. 

 

Quantitative estimation of Lipids 

Lipids  are  an  essential  constituent  of  all  plant  cells.  The 

vegetative cells of plants contain 5 to 10% lipid by dry weight, 

and  almost  all  of  this  weight  is  found  in  the  membranes. 

Membrane  lipids  are  important  for  improvement  of 

photosynthesis  against  high  temperature  stress  and  improved 

photosynthesis means improved stress tolerance as well 

[14]


. In 

the  present  study  free  fatty  acids,  total  cholesterol, 

phospholipids,  triglycerides  were  estimated  using  standard 

procedures. 

 

 

Table 1: Qunatitative estimation of Lipids 



 

Parameters 

References 

Free fatty acids 

Horn and Mehanan,1981

[15]


 

Total cholesterol 

Parekh and Jung,1970 

[16]


 

Phospholipids 

Rouser,1970 

[17]


 

Triglycerides 

Rice,1970 

[18]


 

 

Quantitative estimation of Aminoacids 

Amio  acids  have  traditionally  been  considered  as  precursor 

and  constituents  of  proteins.  Many  amino  acids  also  acts  as 

precursor  of  other  nitrogen  containing  compound  eg:-nucleic 

acids 

[19]


.  Amino  acids  such  as  tryptophan,  methionine, 

histidine,  proline  and  arginine  were  quantitatively  estimated 

using standard procedures. 

 

Table 2: Quantitative estimation of Amino acids 

 

Parameter 

References 

Tryptophan Methionine Proline 

Sadasivam and Manickam, 1996 

[20]


 

Histidine 

Kapeller and Adler,1933 

[21]


 

Arginine 

Sakaguchi,1925 

[22]


 

 

Statistical Analysis 

All  the  analyses  were  performed  in  triplicate  and  the  results 

were  statistically  analyzed  and  expressed  as  mean  (n=3)  ± 

standard deviation (SD). 

 

Results  

Lipids  are  the  major  form  of  carbon  storage  in  the  seeds  of 

many  plant  species.  Lipids  are  the  most  effective  source  of 

storage  energy,  function  as  insulators  of  delicate  internal 

organs  and  hormones  and  play  an  important  role  as  the 

structural constituents of most of the cellular membranes. 

 Free  amino  acids  and  polyamines  take  part  in  several 

metabolic  processes  and  they  are  involved  in  the  protection 

against abiotic stresses.  

The results obtained from the present study are shown in Table 

3 and Table 4. 

 

Table 3: Quantitative estimation of lipids 

 

Primary 

metabolites 

Aqueous hot extract of Eugenia uniflora 

leaves(mg/g) 

Triglycerides 

1.88 ± 0.08 

Total cholesterol 

0.67 ± 0.07 

Free fatty acids 

2.70 ± 0.10 

Phospholipids 

0.93 ± 0.07 

Values are expressed by mean ± SD of 3 Samples 

 

 


 

42



 ~ 

Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

Table 4: Quantitative estimation of Amino acids 

 

Primary 



metabolites 

Aqueous hot extract of Egenia uniflora 

leaves(mg/g) 

Tryptophan 

0.70 ± 0.04 

Methionine 

0.19 ± 0.04 

Histidine 

1.06 ± 0.05 

Proline 


0.38 ± 0.04 

Arginine 

1.84 ± 0.08 

 

Values are expressed by mean ± SD of 3 Samples



 

 

Discussion 

In  the  present  study  hot  water  extract  of  Eugenia  uniflora 

shows  higher  amount  of  free  fatty  acids  (2.70  ±  0.10  mg/  g) 

followed  by triglycerides (1.88  ± 0.08 mg/g).The  fatty  acid is 

found in  every  cell of the plant and is essential to growth.  As 

part  of  complex  lipids,  fatty  acids  are  also  important  for 

thermal  and  electrical  insulation,  and  for  mechanical 

protection. Triglycerides make up the structure of all vegetable 

oils  and  fats  found  in  nature.  It  acts  as  energy  reserve  when 

stored as adipose tissue also acts as insulator, shock protection. 

Phospholipids  are  important  components  of  the  lipid  bi-layer 

of  the  cell  membrane  of  all  cells.  The  cell  membrane  has  an 

essential  general  role  of  maintaining  cell  order  and  integrity 

and  a  number  of  disease  control  mechanisms  involve 

compounds  that  directly  (by  partitioning  into  the  membrane 

and  inducing  disorder)  or  indirectly  (by  inhibiting  fatty  acid 

biosynthetic  pathways)  target  the  phospholipids  of  the  cell 

membrane 

[23]

.  The  level  of  Phospholipids  in  the  aqueous  hot 



extract  of  Eugenia  uniflora leaves  was  0.13  ±  0.07mg/g.  The 

level  of  cholesterol  was  very  low  compared  to  others  0.67  ± 

0.07 mg /g. 

Tryptophan  is  an  essential  amino  acid  which  acts  as  building 

blocks  in  protein  biosynthesis.  In  addition  tryptophan 

functions as a biochemical precursor for many compounds 

[24]



The  level  of  tryptophan  in  aqueous  hot  extract  of  Eugenia 



uniflora leaves was 0.70 ± 0.04mg/g. 

Methionine  is  needed  to  produce  two  sulphur  containing 

amino  acids  cysteine  and  taurine  which  helps  the  body  to 

eliminate  toxins,  build  up  strong,  healthy  tissue  and  promote 

cardiovascular  health 

[25]


.  The  level  of  methionine  in  the 

aqueous hot extract of Eugenia uniflora leaves was 0.19 ± 0.04 

mg / g. 

Histidine is found abundantly in haemoglobin.It has been used 

in  the  treatment  of  reheumatoid  arthritis,  allergic  diseases, 

ulcers and anemia. Deficiency can cause poor hearing 

[26]

. The 


level  of  histidine  in  the  aqueous  hot  extract  of  Eugenia 

uniflora leaves was 1.06 ± 0.05 mg/g. 

Proline  is  a  proreogenic  aminoacid  with  an  exceptional 

conformational  rigidity  and  is  essential  for  primary 

metabolism 

[27]

. Proline accumulation has been reported during 



conditions  of  drought 

[28]


  high  salinity 

[29]


  high  light  and  UV 

irradiation 

[30]

,  heavy  metals 



[31]

,  oxidative  stress 

[32]

  and  in 



response  to  biotic  stresses 

[33,  34]

.  The  level  of  proline  in 

aqueous  hot  extract  of  Eugenia  uniflora  leaves  was  0.38  ± 

0.04mg/g. 

Arginine  play  an  important  role  in  the  healing  of  wounds,  in 

muscle growth and in fetal and child development. It turns into 

nitric  oxide  in  the  body  and  cause  vasodilation,  a  relaxant  of 

arterial walls and facilitiates blood flow. The level of arginine 

was  more  compared  to  other  amino  acids  in  the  aqueous  hot 

extract of Eugenia uniflora leaves was 1.84 ± 0.08 mg / g. 

The  values  of  amino  acid  concentration  in  this  study  showed 

that  aqueous  hot  extract  of  Eugenia  uniflora  leaves  contains 

considerable amounts of lipids and amino acids and confirmed 

that  the  nutritional  quality  of  the  sample  was  commendable 

and may included in treating various diseases. 

 

Conclusion 

Plants  and its products are  used  as  medicine  from the  ancient 

time1. Recently there has  been a shift in universal trend from 

synthetic  to  herbal  medicine 

[35]

.  It  is  estimated  by  the  World 



Health Organization that approximately 75-80% of the world's 

population  uses  plant  medicines  either  partly  or  entirely  as 

medicine.  Interest  in  plant  derived  drug  increases  mainly  due 

to the increasing use, and  misuse, of  existing synthetic  drugs. 

This poses the need for search and development of new drugs 

to  cure  diseases.  The  chemical  substances  of  the  medicinal 

plants which have the capacity of exerting a physiologic action 

on  the  human  body  are  the  primary  features.  The  bioactive 

compounds  of  plants  compounds  are  considered  to  be  most 

important.  The  phytochemical  research  that  has  been  done 

based  on  the  ethno-pharmacological  information  forms  the 

effective  approach  in  the  discovery  of  new  medicinal  agents 

from higher plants. 

 The  results  obtained  in  the  present  study  indicate  Eugenia 



uniflora  leaves  have  the  potential  to  act  as  a  source  of  useful 

drugs  because  of  presence  of  various  phytochemical 

components  such  as  various  lipids  and  amino  acids.  The 

results  are  very  much  encouraging  but  scientific  validation  is 

necessary before being put into practice. 

 

References 

1.  Kirtikar  KR,  Basu  BD.  Indian  Medicinal  Plants. 

International  book  distributors,  Dehardun,  India,  1995; 

1:830-832. 

2.  Haseena Bhanu. Effect of  Hybanthus enneaspermus  (l.)  f. 

muell.  on  mice  liver  glutathione  s-transferases  under  the 

influence  of  paracetamol’’  Thesis  submitted  to  Sri 

Venkateswara  University,  Tirupathi  Andhra  Pradesh, 

2010. 


3.  Dahanukar SA, Kulkarni RA, Rege NN. Pharmacology of 

medicinal  plants  and  natural  products.  Indian  Journal  of 

Pharmacology 2000; 32:S81-S118 

4.  Schippmann  U,  Leaman  DJ,  Cunningham  AB.  Impact  of 

cultivation  and  gathering  of  medicinal  plants  on 

biodiversity:  Global  trends  and  issues.  Biodiversity  and 

the Ecosystem Approach in Agriculture. Proc. 9th session 

of  the  Commission  on  Genetic  Resources  for  Food  and 

Agriculture. 

Oct, 


12–13, 

2002. 


FAO, 

Rome. 


ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/005/aa010e/AA010E00.pdf | 

5.  Joy  PP,  Thomas  J,  Mathew  S,  Skaria  BP.  Medicinal 

Plants.  Tropical  Horticulture  Naya  Prokash,  Calcutta, 

2001; 2:449-632. 

6.  Consolini  AE,  Sarubbio  M.  Pharmacological  effects  of 

Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae)  aqueous  extract  on rat’s 

heart. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 2002; 81(1):57-63. 

7.  Adebajo  AC,  OlokiKJ,  Aladesanmi  A.  Antimicrobial 

activity of the leaf  extract of Eugenia uniflora. Journal of 

Phytotherapy Resource 1989; 3(6):258-259. 

8.  Weyerstahl  P  et  al.  Volatile  constituents  of  Eugenia 



uniflora leaf oil. Planta Médica 1988; 54(6):546-549. 

9.  Oliveira  AL  et  al.  Volatile  compounds  from  pitanga  fruit 

(Eugeniauniflora L.). Food Chemistry 2006; 99(1):1-5. 

10.  Lima  VLAG,  Mélo  EA,  Lima  DES.  Fenólicos  e 

carotenoids  totais  em  pitanga.  Scientia  Agricola  (In 

French) 2002; 59:3:447-450. 

11.  Rai  VK.  Role  of  amino  acids  in  plant  responses  to 

stresses. BiolPlant 2009; 45:481-487. 


 

43



 ~ 

Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

 

12.  Alcázar  R,  Marco  F,  Cueves  JC,  Patron  M,  Ferrando  A, 



Carrasco  P  et  al.  Involvement  of  polyamines  in  plant 

response to abiotic stress. Biotechnol Lett 2006; 28:1867-

1876. 

13.  Murakami  Y,  Tsuyama M,  Kobayashi Y,  Kodama  H,  Iba 



K. Science 2000; 2(87):476-479. 

14.  Horn  WT,  Menahan  LA.  A  censitive  method  for 

determination  of  free  fatty  acids  in  plasma.  J.  Lipid  res 

19812; 122:377-81. 

15.  Parekh  AC,  Jung  DH.  Cholesterol  determination  with 

Ferric acetate-Uranium acetate and Sulphuric acid-Ferrous 

sulphate reagents, Anal. Chem 1970; 42:423-428. 

16.  Rouser  G,  Fleischer  S,  Yamamoto  A.  Two  dimensional 

thin layer  chromatographic  separation  of  polar  lipids  and 

determination  of  phospholipids  by  phosphorous  analysis 

of spots. Lipids 1970; 5:494-6. 

17.  Rice EW. Triglyceride in Serum. In: Standard methods in 

clin; Chem. Rodick, M.p (Ed). Academic  press, Newyork 

1970; 6:215-222. 

18.  Sadhasivam  S,  Manickam  A.  Biochemical  methods  for 

agricultural Science, 1996. 

19.  Rai  VK.  Role  of  amino  acids  in  plant  responses  to 

stresses. BIOLOGA PLANTARIUM 2002;  45(4):481-48, 

2002. 

20.  Kapeller,  Adler  R.  Estimation  of  free  amino  acids, 



Biochem. Z, 1933, 264:133. 

21.  Sakaguchi  S.  Estimation  of  arginine,  J.  Biochem,  Tokyo 

1925; 5:133. 

22.  Avis  TJ.  Antifungal  compounds  that  target  fungal 

membrane: application  in plant disease  control. Canadian 

Journal of Plant Pathology 2007; 29:323-329. 

23.  Kopple  JD,  Swenseid  ME.  Evidence  that  histidine  is  an 

essential  amino  acid  in  normal  and  chronically  uremic 

man.J Clin Invest 1975; 55(5):881-891. 

24.  Gold CM. Essential amino acids, CMG archives, 2009, 2-

4. 


25.  Tsang  D,  Tsang  YS,  Ito  WK,  Wong  RN.  Myelin  basic 

protein  is a zinc-binding protein in brain; possible role in 

myelin compaction, Neuro chem. Res 1997; 22(7):811-9. 

26.  Kemble AR, mac person HT, Liberation of amino acids in 

perennial  ray  grass  during  wilting,  Biochem.  J  1954; 

58:46-59. 

27.  Choudhary  NL  et  al.  (2005)  Expression  of  delta1-

pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase gene during drought in 

rice  (Oryza  sativa  L.).  Ind.  J.  Biochem.  Biophys  2005; 

42:366-370. 

28.  Yoshiba  Y  et  al.  Correlation  between  the  induction  of  a 

genefor delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase and the 

accumulation  of  proline  in  Arabidopsis  thaliana  under 

osmotic stress. Plant J 1995; 7:751-760. 

29.  Saradhi  PP  et  al.  Proline  accumulates  in  plants  exposed 

toUV  radiation  and  protects  them  against  UV  induced 

peroxidation.  Biochem.  Biophys.  Res.  Commun  1995; 

209:1-5. 

30.  Schat  H  et  al.  Heavy  metal-induced  accumulation  of  free 

proline  in  a  metal-tolerant  and  a  non-tolerant  ecotype  of 

Silenevulgaris. Physiol. Plant 1997; 101:477-482. 

31.  Yang  SL  et  al.  Hydrogen  peroxide-induced  proline  and 

metabolic pathway of its accumulation in maize seedlings. 

J. PlantPhysiol 2009; 166:1694-1699. 

32.  Fabro  G  et  al.  Proline  accumulation  and  AtP5CS2  gene 

activation  are  induced  by  plant-pathogen  incompatible 

interactions  in  Arabidopsis.  Mol.  Plant–Microbe  Interact 

2004; 17:343-350. 

33.  Haudecoeur  E  et  al.  Proline  antagonizes  GABA-induced 

quenching 

of 

quorum-sensing 



in 

Agrobacterium 

tumefaciens.  Proc.Natl.  Acad.  Sci.  U.  S.  A  2009; 

106:14587-14592. 

34.  Goyal  M,  Sharma  SK.  Traditional  wisdom  and  value 

addition prospects of arid foods of desert region of North 

West  India.Indian  Journal  of  Traditional  Knowledge 

2009; 8:581-585. 

35.  Dnacuraipandiyan  V,  Ayyanar  M,  Ignacimuthu  S. 

antimicrobial  activity  of  some  Elthnomedical  Plants  used 

by  Paliyar  Tribe  from  Tamilnadu,  India.  BMC 

complementary and alternative medicine, 2006, 635.  




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə