Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999



Yüklə 61.44 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü61.44 Kb.

T

T

H



H

R

R



E

E

A



A

T

T



E

E

N



N

E

E



D

D

 



 

S

S



P

P

E



E

C

C



I

I

E



E

S

S



 

 

S



S

C

C



I

I

E



E

N

N



T

T

I



I

F

F



I

I

C



C

 

 



C

C

O



O

M

M



M

M

I



I

T

T



T

T

E



E

E

E



 

 

Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 

 

The Minister’s delegate approved this Conservation Advice on 01/04/2016



 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa (scaly-leaved featherflower) Conservation Advice 

Page 1 of 4 

Conservation Advice

 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa 

scaly-leaved featherflower 



Conservation Status 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa (scaly-leaved featherflower) is listed as Endangered under 

the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cwlth) (EPBC Act). The 

species is eligible for listing as Endangered as, prior to the commencement of the EPBC Act, it 

was listed as Endangered under Schedule 1 of the Endangered Species Protection 



Act 1992 (Cwlth). 

The main factors that are the cause of the species being eligible for listing in the Endangered 

category are its very low total number of mature individuals (fewer than 250) and a severe 

population size reduction in the past (based on declines in extent and habitat quality).  

The scaly-leaved featherflower is also listed as Critically Endangered under the Wildlife 

Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia). The Western Australian Government identifies that 

the species is eligible for listing in the Critically Endangered category under IUCN criteria A4c 

(very severe reduction in population size based on declines in extent and habitat quality), 

B1ab (i,ii,iii,iv,v)+2ab (i,ii,iii,iv,v) (very restricted distribution that is precarious for survival based 

on severe fragmentation and observed continuing decline), C2a(i) (very low population size, 

observed continuing decline and fewer than 50 individuals in each subpopulation) and 

D (extremely low number of mature individuals) (DPAW 2014). 

Description 

The scaly-leaved featherflower is a dense bushy shrub growing 1.5 m tall and 1 m wide. It has 

rounded to elliptic leaves that are 1.5-2 mm long with prominent oil glands. The leaves closely 

overlap and are pressed to the stem, providing the scaly appearance from which this subspecies 

derives its name (the Latin word for scaly is squamosus). Flowers are produced in late spring 

and early summer and are closely packed, forming dense spikes on the ends of the branches. 

They open mauve-pink before the whole spike fades evenly to white with age (George 2002, 

and Brown et al. 1998, cited in Stack et al., 2004).  

 

The scaly-leaved featherflower differs from V. s. subsp. spicata in its smaller leaves and flowers 



(George, 2002, cited in Stack et al., 2004), and the latter seems to occur further north (Western 

Australian Herbarium, 2015). Scaly-leaved featherflower individuals may live for at least 

35 years (Stack et al. 2004) and the subspecies is known to hybridise with the co-occurring 

V. comosa (George 2002, cited in Stack et al. 2004).  

Distribution

 

 

The scaly-leaved featherflower is endemic to the Three Springs and Mingenew areas, 300 km 

south-east of Geraldton in Western Australia. The species occurs over an estimated linear range 

of 20 km. The area that it occurs in has been extensively cleared and most subpopulations 

occur along narrow road reserves (Stack et al., 2004). 

 

Scaly-leaved featherflower has been recorded from ten subpopulations, however, only six were 



extant in 2011 (DEC 2011, cited in DSEWPaC 2011). Between 2004 (when the national 

recovery plan was adopted) and 2011, two wild subpopulations became extinct (DEC 2011, 

cited in DSEWPaC 2011). 

 


 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa (scaly-leaved featherflower) Conservation Advice 

Page 2 of 4 

In 2011, the subspecies had an abundance of 37 mature plants: the largest subpopulation was a 

translocated site (17 plants), three sites had fewer plants (12 plants, 7 plants and 1 plant) and 

the three other sites had not been monitored since 2003 (DEC 2011, cited in DSEWPaC 2011). 

The translocated population exists in very good habitat, however, no recruitment has been 

observed at the site and abundance increases are the result of follow up plantings (DEC 2011, 

cited in DSEWPaC 2011).  



Relevant Biology/Ecology 

Scaly-leaved featherflower occurs in open mallee over low scrub (Stack et al., 2004) on 

sandplain flats on deep yellow sands, yellow-brown sand and yellow clayey sand 

(Spooner 2005, cited in Western Australian Herbarium, 2015). Associated species include 



Eucalyptus ebbanoensis (sandplain mallee), E. jucundaActinostrobus arenarius

Grevillea biformisG. eriostachyaJacksonia sp., Ecdeiocolea monostachya

Verticordia comosaV. monadelpha (woolly featherflower), V. densiflora var. stelluligera 

and V. eriocephala.  

 

Verticordia plants are generally killed by fire and post-fire regeneration occurs mainly from seed, 

however, a few species have a lignotuber and resprout after fire (George, pers. comm., cited in 

Stack et al., 2004). The specific fire response of scaly-leaved featherflower is unknown.  

 

Propagation of scaly-leaved featherflower has generally been unsuccessful. Of 916 cuttings that 



were struck in 1999 and 2001, only three survived and these were planted at the translocation 

site in 2002. Of an unknown number of seeds that were sown and smoke treated, 18 survived 

and were also used in the translocation (Shade, pers. comm., cited in Stack et al., 2004). In the 

wild, seed viability correlates with abundance of mature plants and habitat quality; as such, 

larger populations in better quality habitat should be protected to improve the species’ chance of 

recovery (Stack et al., 2004). Physical soil disturbance appears to have a positive influence on 

germination of seed, with two seedlings germinating after roadworks at one subpopulation 

(Stack et al. 2004).  



Threats 

Scaly-leaved featherflower subpopulations that occur in linear populations are threatened by 

edge effects, inappropriate maintenance of roads, fences and firebreaks, and impacts 

associated with degraded habitat (insufficient pollinator activity and lack of available habitat for 

recruitment) (Stack et al. 2004). Habitat quality is degraded at all known natural sites and most 

subpopulations are threatened by weed invasion and competition, warren excavation by rabbits 

(Oryctolagus cuniculus) and inappropriate fire regimes (Stack et al. 2004). Habitat degradation 

or lack of appropriate disturbance has severely limited natural recruitment, which has only been 

recorded at one site (Stack et al. 2004). 

Conservation Actions 

Conservation and Management priorities 

New subpopulations established  

  As the subspecies only occurs on highly vulnerable roadsides, translocation to new, safe-



sites within a substantial reserve system is a priority. Habitat matching (edaphic, 

vegetation, topography) should be undertaken in planning a translocation. Relevant 

policies should be referred to for guidance for undertaking translocations 

(e.g. CALM 1995; Vallee et al. 2004). 

 

 

Habitat loss, disturbance and modifications 



  Seek long term protection of habitat on private land. In 2004, there were no reserves that 

contained appropriate habitat for the species (Stack et al. 2004). 

  With the cooperation of the landholders, rehabilitate habitat in and around subpopulations 



through the planting of local species (Stack et al. 2004). This activity would act as a buffer 

to subpopulations and reduce edge effects (Stack et al. 2004).

 


 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa (scaly-leaved featherflower) Conservation Advice 

Page 3 of 4 

  Subpopulations may benefit from periodic disturbance, which may stimulate recruitment. 



Small scale mechanical disturbance should be used during hot weather. Long-term, 

intensive weed control should be undertaken following disturbance events. Protect 

juvenile plants (i.e. particularly after germination events) from grazing by livestock and 

rabbits.  

  Ensure existing population is protected during road maintenance and upgrading. 



 

Stakeholder Engagement 

  Ensure relevant stakeholders (the local community, private landowners, and public land 



managers) are aware of the species’ occurrence and provide protection measures 

against key threats to ensure subpopulations are not accidently damaged or destroyed. 

  Continue to promote awareness of the species with relevant stakeholders through the use 



of posters, fliers, electronic media and Declared Rare Flora markers. 

 

Invasive species (including threats from grazing, trampling, predation) 



  Suitably constraining stock access to known sites on public land, including prevention of 

grazing through fences, and manage sheep grazing on private land and other land 

tenure.  

  Undertake annual rabbit baiting at Three Springs subpopulations. Continue annual rabbit 



baiting at the Geraldton District subpopulation. Install and maintain rabbit-proof fencing to 

limit the impact of rabbit warren construction. Relevant policies should be referred to for 

guidance for rabbit control (e.g. DEWHA, 2008). 

  Undertake weed control for invasive species at affected populations and in the local area 



that could become a threat to the scaly-leaved featherflower. Suitable methods of weed 

control include hand weeding or localised application of herbicide during the 

appropriate season. 

 

Fire 



  Develop and implement a fire management strategy that recommends fire frequency, 

intensity, season and control measures. Relevant policies should be referred to for 

guidance for fire management in linear reserves (e.g. RCC 2011). The species is at risk 

of localised extinction caused by too frequent fire. Fire prevention, except when used as a 

recovery tool, has been recommended (Stack et al. 2004).  

  Any use of prescribed or experimental fires must be very well justified, and is typically an 



action of last resort. It must have a carefully planned weed management strategy and 

demonstrated funding to ensure post-fire monitoring and control actions occur (e.g. weed 

control based on sound scientific evidence). 

  Provide maps of known occurrences to local and state fire teams and seek inclusion of 



mitigation measures in bush fire risk management plan/s, risk register and/or 

operation maps.  



Information and research priorities  

  Undertake seed germination and/or vegetative propagation trials, including post fire,to 



determine the requirements for successful establishment (Stack et al., 2004). Seed is 

held by the Threatened Flora Seed Centre (Stack et al. 2004).  

  The following research topics have been recommended to help inform the recovery of the 



subspecies: the causes of low levels of viable seed production; seed ageing requirements 

for the breaking of seed dormancy; the role of disturbance, competition, rainfall and 

grazing in germination recruitment; pollination biology; requirements of pollinators; 

reproductive strategies; the presence or absence of a lignotuber, enabling the recovery of 

adult plants following physical disturbance; and the population genetic structure (Stack 

et al. 2004).  



Survey and monitoring priorities 

  Develop predictive models for the species geographical distributions based on the 



environmental conditions of sites of known occurrences. Requires a reasonably sized 

 

Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa (scaly-leaved featherflower) Conservation Advice 

Page 4 of 4 

data-set of species presence information plus the range of environmental variables that 

are known to influence the species distribution. If this data is not available then a 

research priority should be to collect and assimilate this information. See Phillips and 

colleagues (2006) for guidance on species distribution modelling. 

  Develop habitat suitability models to determine the ecological/environmental indices 



responsible for a species distribution, and how it may change due to the impending 

threats. Requires a reasonable high number of presence records, plus the environmental 

variables located at this site and other sites chosen at random. See Guisan & 

Zimmermann (2000) for guidance on habitat suitability modelling. 

  With permission of landowners, undertake surveys for new subpopulations in suitable 



habitat on private property. 

  Design and implement a monitoring program or, if appropriate, support and enhance 



existing programs. Annual monitoring has been recommended measuring habitat quality 

(weed invasion and salinity), abundance, pollinator activity, seed production, recruitment, 

subpopulation health, impacts of browsing and disease (Stack et al., 2004).  

References cited in the advice 

CALM (Department of Conservation and Land Management) (1995). Translocation of 

Threatened Flora and Fauna. Policy Statement No. 29. Government of Western Australia. 

DSEWPaC (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and 

Communities) (2011). Review of Recovery Plan for Verticordia spicata 

subsp. squamosa

DEWHA (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts) (2008). Threat 

abatement plan for competition and land degradation by rabbits. Commonwealth of 

Australia. 

DPAW (Department of Parks and Wildlife) (2014). Threatened Flora Rankings Current 

2 December 2014. Government of Western Australia. 

Guisan, A., & Zimmermann, N.E. (2000) Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. 

Ecological Modelling 135: 147-186. 

Phillips, S.J., Anderson, R.P., & Schapire, R.E. (2006). Maximum entropy modeling of species 

geographic distributions. Ecological Modelling 190(3-4): 231-259. 

RCC (Roadside Conservation Committee) (2011). Biodiversity Conservation and Fire in Road 

and Rail Reserves: Management Guidelines. Government of Western Australia. 

Stack, G., Chant, A., Broun, G., & English, V. (2004). Scaly-leaved featherflower 

(Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa) Interim Recovery Plan 2004-2009. Interim 

Recovery Plan No. 185. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western 

Australian Threatened Species and Conservation Unit. 

Vallee, L., Hogbin, T., Monks, L., Makinson, B., Matthes, B., & Rossetto, M. (2004). Guidelines 

for the translocation of threatened plants in Australia - Second Edition. Canberra, ACT: 

Australian Network for Plant Conservation. 



Other sources cited in the advice 

Western Australian Herbarium (2015). FloraBase—the Western Australian Flora. Department of 

Parks and Wildlife. 

Viewed: 8 October 2015  

Available on the Internet at: 

https://florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au/



  

 

Document Outline

  • Fire

Каталог: biodiversity -> threatened -> species -> pubs
pubs -> Syzygium hodgkinsoniae Conservation Advice Page 1 of 4 Approved conservation advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for Verticordia apecta
pubs -> Advice to the Minister for Environment Protection, Heritage and the Arts from the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) on Amendment to the list of Threatened Species under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
pubs -> Allocasuarina fibrosa Conservation Advice Page 1 of 4 Approved Conservation Advice (s266B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Approved Conservation Advice for
pubs -> Established under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə