Evidence of inbreeding depression within populations and genetic divergence among populations



Yüklə 272.48 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü272.48 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

1041

American Journal of Botany 88(6): 1041–1051. 2001.



C

ROSS

-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

:

EVIDENCE OF INBREEDING DEPRESSION WITHIN

POPULATIONS AND GENETIC DIVERGENCE

AMONG POPULATIONS

1

E



LIZABETH

A. S


TACY

Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA

Knowing the spatial patterns of cross-fertility in natural plant populations yields key insight into biparental inbreeding depression,

isolation by distance, and, ultimately, speciation. Three adults each of two tropical tree species (Syzygium rubicundum and Shorea



cordifolia) were each crossed with five conspecific pollen donors ranging from self to trees occurring in separate forest reserves (12

and 35 km distance for S. rubicundum and Sh. cordifolia, respectively). Cross-fertility was estimated as fruit set, seed germination,

and seedling survivorship and height at 1 yr. Means of most cross-fertility measures increased steadily with outcrossing distance,

peaking at 1–2 km for S. rubicundum and 1–10 km for Sh. cordifolia, and then declining at the between-forest crosses. However, seed

germination and seedling height for Sh. cordifolia suggested hybrid vigor in between-forest crosses. The mean fitness cost of nearest-

neighbor mating relative to crossing with more distant neighbors was 45% for S. rubicundum and 0% for Sh. cordifolia. The mean

fitness cost of between-forest crosses was 52% and 70% for the two species. Crossing effects on fitness diminished between the stages

of fruit set and 1-yr-old seedlings. Results indicate a strong potential for inbreeding depression within forest tree populations and

partial reproductive isolation among forests in Sri Lanka’s wet zone.

Key words:

hand-pollination; inbreeding depression; outbreeding depression; Shorea; Sinharaja; Sri Lanka; Syzygium; tropical

trees.

Estimating cross-fertility at multiple spatial scales within a



plant species’ range allows insight into the significance of ge-

netic incompatibility and inbreeding and outbreeding depres-

sion under natural conditions. At smaller spatial scales, the

restricted seed dispersal characteristic of many plants should

result in relatedness among near-neighbors in natural popula-

tions. Where neighboring plants are related, mating between

neighbors (i.e., biparental inbreeding; Uyenoyama, 1986) may

lead to reduced reproductive fitness due to inbreeding depres-

sion or genetic incompatibility between mates. While patterns

of fine-scale genetic relatedness have been revealed for a num-

ber of herbaceous species (e.g., Epperson and Clegg, 1986;

Waser, 1987; Schoen and Latta, 1989), for woody species, par-

ticularly angiosperms, data on within-population genetic struc-

ture are limited. Some studies have revealed spatial clustering

of adult genotypes (or alleles) in animal-pollinated forest trees

(Acer saccharum—Perry and Knowles, 1991; Swartzia sim-



plex—Hamrick, Murawski, and Nason, 1993; Quercus rub-

ra—Sork, Huang, and Wiener, 1993; Quercus laevis—Berg

and Hamrick, 1995; Cordia alliodora—Boshier, Chase, and

Bawa, 1995), while others have failed to support the expec-

tation of genetic relatedness among neighboring adults (Psy-



chotria nervosa—Dewey and Heywood, 1988; Alseis blacki-

ana and Platypodium elegans—Hamrick, Murawski, and Na-

1

Manuscript received 4 March 2000; revision accepted 28 September 2000.



The author thanks S. Gunatilleke and N. Gunatilleke at the Department of

Botany, University of Peradeniya for guidance and logistic support; the Forest

Department of Sri Lanka for permission to conduct this work within the Sin-

haraja World Heritage Site; the Botany Department, University of Peradeniya

for use of its facilities; S. Harischandran, H. Gamage, and M. Gunadasa for

assistance with hand-pollinations; and S. Harischandran and A. Anura for

tending greenhouse seedlings. P. Ashton, K. Bawa, N. Gunatilleke, J. Ham-

rick, L. Kaufman, and J. Mitton provided helpful discussions; P. Ashton, S.

Dayanandan, and C. Schneider commented on earlier drafts; and B. Wieninger

assisted with the figures. This work was supported in part by funds from the

Conservation, Food, & Health Foundation, Inc.

son, 1993). Regardless of patterns of relatedness, mating is

often restricted to local neighborhoods in herbaceous species

(Levin and Kerster, 1974; Endler, 1979; Waser and Price,

1983) and in woody species, particularly when flowering

adults are clustered (Linhart, 1973; Stacy et al., 1996). The

potential for biparental inbreeding depression in natural pop-

ulations has been demonstrated for a number of herbaceous

and coniferous tree species (Coles and Fowler, 1976; Park and

Fowler, 1982; Levin, 1984; Schemske and Pautler, 1984;

McCall, Mitchell-Olds, and Waller, 1991; Heywood, 1993;

Waser and Price, 1994; Trame, Coddington, and Paige, 1995;

Byers, 1998). Very little is known, however, of biparental in-

breeding depression in natural populations of woody angio-

sperms.

Inbreeding depression is frequently cited as an unavoidable



consequence of anthropogenic disturbance to tropical forests

(e.g., forest fragmentation, logging), where theory predicts that

normal mating patterns within already low-density tree popu-

lations are shifted to favor short-distance crosses. To date,

however, the consequences of elevated near-neighbor mating

for population fitness in tropical trees have yet to be quantified

empirically. Two fundamental questions to be addressed are:

Do adults avoid maturing seed derived from near-neighbor

crosses and, if not, how fit are near-neighbor-derived progeny

relative to others? This study assesses the consequences of

near-neighbor mating in two tropical tree species directly

through fitness comparisons of crosses between nearest neigh-

bors with crosses involving more distant mates.

At larger spatial scales, geographically separated popula-

tions may differ genetically due to random genetic drift or

selection (Wright, 1943). Crosses between members of widely

separated populations, therefore, may yield progeny of sub-

optimal fitness due to outbreeding depression (Bateson, 1978;

Price and Waser, 1979). Most evidence of outbreeding depres-

sion in plants derives from crosses between populations (e.g.,



1042

[Vol. 88


A

MERICAN


J

OURNAL OF

B

OTANY


Fig. 1.

Schematic of Sri Lanka showing the general locations of pollen

donors and maternal trees used in the cross-fertility experiment. Maternal trees

occurred at Sinharaja (S): 400–500 m above sea level. Pollen donors occurred

at Pitikale (P): 350–500 m, Morapitiya (M): 300 m, Walankanda (W): 600–

900 m, Gilimale (G): 400–500 m, and Sinharaja. Sinharaja Reserve is located

between 8

Њ21Ј and 8Њ34Ј E and between 6Њ21Ј and 6Њ26Ј N.

Ritland and Ganders, 1987; Sobrevila, 1988; Fischer and Mat-

thies, 1997). However, evidence of outbreeding depression

within populations has been reported for a few species (Waser

and Price, 1983, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994; Schemske and Pau-

tler, 1984; Waser et al., 1987; McCall, Mitchell-Olds, and Wal-

ler, 1988). Ultimate consequences of outbreeding depression

should include reinforcement of reproductive isolation by dis-

tance and increased genetic differentiation over some spatial

scale, possibly leading to speciation. In tropical forests, models

for the evolution of high tree species diversity typically invoke

genetic divergence of populations over some spatial scale (e.g.,

Fedorov, 1966; Ashton, 1969). Very little is known, however,

of the spatial scale of genetic divergence in tropical tree spe-

cies.


While trends toward outbreeding depression have been doc-

umented for a number of plant species (citations above), there

are no published reports of outbreeding depression in any for-

est tree (Coles and Fowler, 1976; Park and Fowler, 1982, 1984;

Crome and Irvine, 1986; Hardner, Potts, and Gore, 1998). This

study assesses the significance and approximate spatial scale

of outbreeding depression (as a proxy for genetic divergence)

in two tropical tree species through fitness comparisons of

long-distance crosses with crosses over short and moderate

distances.

For each of two tropical tree species, the following ques-

tions were addressed: (1) How does cross-fertility vary with

outcrossing distance? (2) What is the potential for inbreeding

depression in near-neighbor crosses? (3) What is the potential

for outbreeding depression over greater distances within and

between forest reserves? and (4) How do the strengths of in-

breeding and outbreeding effects vary among early life history

stages, including seed set, seed germination, and the survi-

vorship and growth of seedlings?

MATERIALS AND METHODS



Study site and species—This work was done in the area of the aseasonal

Sinharaja World Heritage Site, an 8800-ha, UNESCO Man and the Biosphere

Reserve, located in the southwest wet zone of Sri Lanka (Fig. 1). The forests

of southwest Sri Lanka are severely fragmented as a result of clearing for

coffee and rubber plantations that took place during the British colonial period

(

Ͼ100 yr ago). Compared to many tropical rain forests, the flora of Sinharaja



is relatively species-poor (

ϳ230 species of woody plants), but characterized

by high endemism (Gunatilleke and Gunatilleke, 1980). The study species

(Syzygium rubicundum and Shorea cordifolia) were selected to represent two

of the major canopy-dominant, economically important genera of the island’s

rain forests. Both species are pollinated predominantly by bees (Apis spp.)

and produce single-seeded fruits. The two species differ in mode of seed

dispersal (bird- or bat-dispersal vs. wind- or gyration-dispersal) and are ex-

pected to exhibit different population genetic structures in natural stands

(Loveless and Hamrick, 1984; Hamrick, Murawski, and Nason, 1993). The

populations targeted for this study, however, occurred in 25

ϩ-yr-old logged

forest at Sinharaja Reserve. Adults of each species are highly clumped in the

logged forest relative to their distributions in unlogged stands. This contrast

suggests that the population structures of these species have been altered in

the high-light, post-logging environment, where regeneration likely resulted

in the establishment of groups of sibs or otherwise related individuals. The

study populations, therefore, offered an ideal opportunity to evaluate the po-

tential for biparental inbreeding depression in forest trees.

Syzygium rubicundum (Myrtaceae), which typically flowers annually, is a

dominant canopy species of mid-slope areas in and around Sinharaja. Adult

density is highly variable in both unlogged and logged forest within Sinharaja

Reserve (Stacy, Harischandran, and Gunatilleke, in press). Flowers of this

species are small and brush-like, and the drupes are primarily bird-dispersed.

Shorea cordifolia (Dipterocarpaceae) is a locally abundant main canopy

species that flowers heavily at irregular supra-annual intervals (I. A. U. N.

Gunatilleke et al., unpublished data). Flowers of this species are white and

short-lived, and the winged fruits are dispersed by wind or gravity. Because

of its highly restricted seed dispersal, genetic relatedness among near neigh-

bors in natural forest is expected to be high. In logged forest at Sinharaja, Sh.



cordifolia usually occurs in clumps of

ϳ5–20 adults, intermixed with smaller

stems (personal observation).

Cross-fertility experiments—In January 1997 three adults of each study

species were selected as maternal trees for the experimental hand-pollinations.

Because flowering is roughly simultaneous among maternal trees and 2–3

workers are required to complete the experimental pollinations at each ma-

ternal tree each day, working with more than three maternal trees per species

was not feasible. To permit daily access to flowers, a platform was constructed

in the canopy of each maternal tree, accessible by a series of interlocking

aluminum ladders wired to the bole. Safety equipment was used for climbing

and while working on platforms.

Throughout the period of flowering (

ϳ2 wk per individual), each maternal

tree was hand-pollinated daily using pollen from five donors representing a

range of crossing distances. Pollen donors included the maternal tree itself,

its nearest neighbor, and three progressively more distant trees. The most

distant pollen donors used occurred 12 and 35 km from the maternal trees,

for S. rubicundum and Sh. cordifolia, respectively (Table 1). Selection of

pollen donors was restricted by the spatial distribution of forest fragments and

populations of the study species. For both species, all but the most distant

pollen donors used (i.e., those from Walankanda for S. rubicundum and Gil-

imale for Sh. cordifolia) occurred within the Sinharaja Forest Reserve. Both

Walankanka and Gilimale refer to large forest reserves that are not contiguous

with Sinharaja (Fig. 1). In addition to tests of self- and cross-fertility, tests of

apomixis and autogamy were done for S. rubicundum, as the breeding system

of this species was unknown. Ultimately, a few to several hundred flowers

were treated with pollen from each donor at each maternal tree (Table 1).


June 2001]

1043


S

TACY


—C

ROSS


-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

T

ABLE


1. Number of flowers pollinated and corresponding crossing distances for each combination of maternal tree and pollen donor of (A)

Syzygium rubicundum and (B) Shorea cordifolia. Shared uppercase superscripts within a treatment indicate the sharing of a pollen donor by

maternal trees. Each maternal tree had its own unique pollen donor for the selfed, nearest-neighbor, and distant-neighbor treatments.

Pollination treatment

Maternal tree

S1

N

Distance


S2

N

Distance


S3

N

Distance


A) Syzygium rubicundum

Selfed


Nearest neighbor

Distant neighbor

Distant, within-forest (Pitikale)

Distant between-forest (Walankanda)

551

642


380

546


A

927


A

0 m


135 m

500 m


1 km

12 km


305

320


213

298


A

630


A

0 m


4 m

400 m


1.5 km

12 km


128

482


401

463


B

615


B

0 m


30 m

80 m


2 km

12 km


Total hand-pollinated

Open-pollinated

3046

450


1766

a



2089

465


B) Shorea cordifolia

Selfed


Nearest neighbor

Distant neighbor

Distant, within-forest (Morapitiya)

Distant between-forest (Gilimale)

233

651


681

680


A

721


A

0 m


25 m

2 km


10 km

35 km


45

345


520

329


A

414


B

0 m


25 m

2 km


10 km

35 km


60

307


373

b



615

B

0 m



10 m

2 km


10 km

35 km


Total hand-pollinated

Open-pollinated

2966

1231


1653

901


1355

1108


a

Due to limited available flowers, the open-pollinated treatment was not done at S2.

b

Due to nonoverlapping flowering phenology, pollinations involving donors from Morapitiya were not possible at S3.



Additionally, a large number of untreated and unbagged flowers on five of

the six maternal trees were monitored for estimation of fruit set rates under

natural, open-pollinated conditions (Table 1).

The crown of each maternal tree was divided into five sections (branches).

Experimental inflorescences for each pollination treatment were then selected

randomly, such that each branch included all five treatments. This approach

avoided within-crown position effects on seed set and facilitated analysis of

variance of fruit set rate. Paper pollinator exclusion bags were used to prevent

pollen contamination of experimental flowers by visiting insects.

To permit daily access to pollen donors, large, flower-bearing branches were

collected from each pollen donor (including each maternal tree, for self-pol-

lination treatments) with the aid of local tree climbers. Branches were placed

cut-end in a stream near Sinharaja Research Station and replaced every 5 d.

During this time, blooming of inflorescences on these branches proceeded

normally and was indistinguishable from that of intact branches. Throughout

the flowering period, newly opened flowers were collected every morning

from bagged inflorescences on pollen branches and transported directly to the

maternal trees. For each pollen donor, hand crosses were conducted by touch-

ing the stigmas of receptive flowers into pollen collected on a glass micro-

scope slide.

At each maternal tree, developing fruits on experimental branches were

counted every 5 d throughout the period of heaviest fruit loss (first 45 d), and

then every 10 d until fruits were fully mature. Mesh bags were placed on

experimental branches just prior to fruit maturation to catch falling fruits. All

seeds resulting from hand-pollinations were sown in a temporary greenhouse

under partial shade (

ϳ50% sunlight) for estimates of percentage seed ger-

mination, and rates of survival and growth of seedlings over a 1-yr period

(washed seeds of S. rubicundum and whole, single-seeded fruits of Sh. cor-

difolia). Seed trays and seedlings were labelled by maternal tree and crossing

treatment. The greenhouse was located at Sinharaja Field Research Station,

and seeds and seedlings were sown and potted, respectively, in local soil.

Conditions for estimation of progeny fitness were therefore not unlike those

in the maternal environment.

Data analysis—A standardized, cumulative index of cross-fitness was cal-

culated for each combination of maternal tree and pollen donor, based on

mature fruit set, seed germination, and survivorship and growth of seedlings.

For each species, mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess the

effects of crossing treatment (fixed effect; with maternal tree included as a

random effect) on the percentage of hand-pollinated flowers setting mature

fruit, rates of seed germination and seedling survivorship, seedling size at 1

yr, and cumulative fitness. Several models were tested using ANOVA: (a)

including all treatments, (b) excluding unbalanced treatments, to permit eval-

uation of interaction terms, (c) minus selfing treatment (as maternal trees were

largely or completely self-incompatible), and (d) grouping all within-Sinharaja

outcrossing treatments to test the effect of within- vs. between-forest crossing.

The effect of crossing distance on each parameter was further tested using

linear or quadratic regression analysis, depending on the shape of the rela-

tionship. To improve normality, all proportion data were transformed prior to

analyses. Lastly, for each maternal tree, the consequences of nearest-neighbor

and long-distance mating were estimated through indices of biparental in-

breeding depression and outbreeding depression, respectively, based on cu-

mulative fitness values.

RESULTS


Fruit setSyzygium rubicundum—Fruit abortion was

heavy for all trees, resulting in low fruit set (range across

treatments: 2.0–9.7%; Fig. 2a). The timing of abortion was

not discernable across treatments. Self-compatibility was low,

but variable, across maternal trees (Fig. 2a). Flowers used for

tests of apomixis (N

ϭ 360) and autogamy (ϭ 582) failed

to set fruit. All analyses of variance in fruit set revealed a

highly significant treatment effect and significant maternal tree

effect, but no significant interaction between treatment and

maternal tree (Tables 2A and 3A). For all three trees, the per-

centage of experimental flowers setting mature fruit showed a

consistent increase with crossing distance, followed by a se-

vere decline in fruit set with the distant between-forest treat-

ment (Fig. 2a). The relationship between crossing distance and

fruit set was nearly identical for the three maternal trees and

significant with or without the self-pollinated treatment in-

cluded in the model (quadratic regression model: arcsine

square-root [fruit set]

ϭ crossing distance [km] ϩ crossing

distance

2

; results without self-pollinated treatment: F



2,57

ϭ

8.25, P



Ͻ 0.0007, R

2

ϭ 0.47). Peak mean fruit set occurred



at a crossing distance of 1–2 km (distant within-forest treat-

1044

[Vol. 88


A

MERICAN


J

OURNAL OF

B

OTANY


Fig. 2.

Percentage of treatment flowers yielding mature fruit from six

experimental crosses using (a) Syzygium rubicundum and (b) Shorea cordi-

folia. Mean, high, and low values for three maternal trees are shown for each

species. Pooled sample sizes are shown in parentheses. Shared superscripts

indicate no significant difference between means.

Figure Abbreviations: Treatments: SELF

ϭ self, NNHBR ϭ nearest neigh-

bor, DNHBR

ϭ distant neighbor, D-WF ϭ distant within-forest (i.e., distant

pollen donor occurring within Sinharaja Forest), D-BF

ϭ distant between-

forest (i.e., distant pollen donor selected from a separate forest reserve),

OPEN


ϭ open-pollinated flowers.

ment) and was 1.7–4.7 times greater than mean fruit set rates

for other hand-pollination treatments, averaged across mater-

nal trees. Mean fruit set rate for the distant within-forest treat-

ment was significantly greater than those for all treatments

except distant-neighbor and open-pollinated, but consistently

exceeded fruit set of open-pollinated flowers (Fig. 2a).

Shorea cordifolia—Fruit set was also low for Sh. cordifolia

(range across treatments: 0–5.3%; Fig. 2b). Again, the timing

of fruit abortion was not discernable among treatments. Selfed

and distant between-forest treatments resulted in 0% and

Ͻ1%

fruit set, respectively. Fruit set from the intermediate-distance



cross-pollinations varied across maternal trees, but with one

exception (nearest-neighbor treatment at Tree number 1) in-

dicated optimal fruit set at an outcrossing range of

Ն2 km


(distant neighbor treatment; Fig. 2b). All analyses of variance

in fruit set revealed a highly significant treatment effect, but

no maternal tree effect (Tables 2B and 3B). The relationship

between crossing distance and fruit set was significant only

when the selfed treatment was excluded (quadratic regression

model: arcsin square root [fruit set]

ϭ crossing distance [km]

ϩ crossing distance

2

F



2,57

ϭ 5.71, Ͻ 0.006, R

2

ϭ 0.41). At



each maternal tree, fruit set rate for open-pollinated flowers

was greater than that for all hand-cross treatments, suggesting

that some aspect of the hand-pollination procedure (e.g., flow-

er handling, bagging) caused reduced fruit set in Sh. cordifolia.

For both species, within-treatment variation among maternal

trees in fruit set was substantial for all outcrosses involving

pollen donors within Sinharaja Reserve. In contrast, variation

in fruit set rate was very low for between-forest crosses (Fig.

2). For Sh. cordifolia, fruit set for the distant between-forest

treatment ranged from only 0.5 to 0.6% and was significantly

lower than the mean fruit set rate for all within-forest out-

crossing treatments combined (mean

ϭ 2.71%, F

1,58


ϭ 9.94,

P

Ͻ 0.0003). For S. rubicundum, mean fruit set for the distant

between-forest treatment (2.67%) was low relative to mean

fruit set rate for all within-forest outcrossing treatments com-

bined (mean

ϭ 5.97%). The difference was nearly significant

(F

1,58


ϭ 3.78, Ͻ 0.06).

  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə