Evidence of inbreeding depression within populations and genetic divergence among populations



Yüklə 272.48 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü272.48 Kb.
1   2   3   4
Seed germinationSyzygium rubicundum—Seed germina-

tion was highly staggered in both natural (Stacy, Harischan-

dran, and Gunatilleke, in press) and greenhouse settings, ex-

tending over

Ͼ4 mo. At 100 d after sowing (when germination

was


ϳ95% complete), the percentages of seeds germinated

were moderate, ranging across treatments from 21 to 49% of

sown seeds (mean

ϭ 36%; pooled across maternal trees; Fig.

3a). Excepting the unusually high germination rate observed

for the nearest-neighbor treatment at Tree number 3 (83.3%),

the relationship between crossing distance and seed germina-

tion was nearly identical to that for fruit set for this species

(Fig. 3a). Including all data points, mean seed germination was

not significantly different among treatments, nor among ma-

ternal trees (Table 3A). Excluding the single outlier did not

change the ANOVA results. Among hand-pollination treat-

ments, peak mean seed germination coincided with peak fruit

set at an outcrossing distance of 1–2 km and was nearly iden-

tical to the mean germination of open-pollinated seeds (Fig.

3a). The relationship between crossing distance and seed ger-

mination was not significant using either a linear or quadratic

regression model.



Shorea cordifolia—Germination of experimental seeds was

rapid and fairly even across treatments (mean

ϭ 62%; range:

55–72% at 45 d; Fig. 3b). A steady increase in mean seed

germination with outcrossing distance is apparent, but not sig-

nificant (F

1,9

ϭ 1.02, Ͻ 0.34, R



2

ϭ 0.40; Fig. 3b). Mean

seed germination was not significantly different among treat-

ments, nor among maternal trees (Table 3B). Interestingly,

mean seed germination for all hand-pollination treatments ex-

ceeded that of open-pollinated seeds (Fig. 3b). While the rea-

son for this observation is not known, the latter estimates were

based on much larger sample sizes and therefore may be more

robust.


June 2001]

1045


S

TACY


—C

ROSS


-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

T

ABLE


2. Summary of analyses of variance for mature fruit set in (A) Syzygium rubicundum and (B) Shorea cordifolia. Data were arcsine square-

root transformed prior to analysis.

Treatments included

Source


df

F

P

A) Syzygium rubicundum

All, except ‘‘Open’’

(i.e., complete model)

Treatment

Maternal tree

Interaction

4

2



8

22.470


5.904

0.614


0.0002***

0.016*


0.762

All


(incomplete model)

Treatment

Maternal tree

5

2



9.905

4.411


Ͻ0.0001***

0.015*


All, except ‘‘Self’’

a

(incomplete model)



Treatment

Maternal tree

4

2

7.305



3.226

Ͻ0.0001***

0.046*

B) Shorea cordifolia



All, except ‘‘Distant-within’’

(i.e., complete model)

Treatment

Maternal tree

Interaction

4

2



8

19.571


1.197

1.885


Ͻ0.0003***

0.336


0.084

All


(incomplete model)

Treatment

Maternal tree

5

2



22.386

0.378


Ͻ0.0001***

0.686


All, except ‘‘Self’’

a

Treatment



Maternal tree

4

2



3.433

1.619


0.065

0.238


One-way ANOVAs

Treatment

Maternal tree

4

2



11.930

0.525


Ͻ0.0001***

0.594


a

As both S. rubicundum and Sh. cordifolia are largely self-infertile.

T

ABLE


3. Summary of one-way analyses of variance for five fitness measures in (A) Syzygium rubicundum and (B) Shorea cordifolia. Prior to

analysis, mature fruit set and seedling survivorship data were arcsine square-root transformed, seed germination data were square-root trans-

formed, and cumulative fitness scores were log

10

transformed.



Fitness estimate

Source


df

effect


df

error


F

P

A) Syzygium rubicundum

Mature fruit set (%)

Treatment

Maternal tree

5

2



79

82

9.905



4.41

Ͻ0.0001***

0.015*

Seed germination (%)



Treatment

Maternal tree

5

2

12



15

0.987


0.432

0.465


0.657

Seedling survivorship (%)

Treatment

Maternal tree

4

2

10



12

2.045


0.272

0.164


0.767

Seedling size at 1 yr

Treatment

Maternal tree

5

2

70



72

0.475


1.026

0.754


0.364

Cumulative fitness

Treatment

5

9



7.093

Ͻ0.006**


B) Shorea cordifolia

Mature fruit set (%)

Treatment

Maternal Tree

5

2

84



87

22.386


0.378

Ͻ0.0001***

0.686

Seed germination (%)



Seedling survivorship (%)

Seedling size at 1 yr

Cumulative fitness

Treatment

Maternal tree

Treatment

Maternal tree

Treatment

Maternal tree

Treatment

4

2

4



2

4

2



4

91

11



10

12

53



65

9

0.456



0.130

0.511


3.714

0.563


0.385

3.214


0.767

0.880


0.730

0.056


0.642

0.682


0.067

Seedling survivorship and growth—Due to attrition from

one life stage to the next, sample sizes of some treatment clas-

ses were low for estimates of seedling survivorship and

growth, which may have impeded statistical tests. No signifi-

cant effects of either crossing treatment or maternal tree were

found for either measure in either species (Table 3). Excluding

selfed treatment seedlings of S. rubicundum (N

ϭ 2), the mean

survivorship rate of seedlings throughout their first year was

high (


Ͼ80%) for all treatments of both species. For both spe-

cies, peak mean seedling survivorship coincided with the dis-

tant within-forest treatment.

For S. rubicundum, mean seedling height at 1 yr postger-

mination increased with outcrossing distance, peaking at an

intermate distance of 1–2 km, and dropping slightly with the

longest distance crosses (Fig. 4a). For Sh. cordifolia, mean

seedling height increased steadily with outcrossing distance,

peaking at the longest-distance cross (Fig. 4b). For both spe-

cies, within-treatment variation in seedling height was high

(Fig. 4). For S. rubicundum, variation in seedling height can

be explained, at least in part, by staggered seed germination.



Cumulative fitness—For each species, the cumulative fit-

ness of each treatment class was calculated as the standardized

product of the four fitness measures (see Fig. 5). For both

species, the distribution of cumulative fitness with respect to

crossing distance was similar to that for fruit set (Fig. 5). For

S. rubicundum, variation in cumulative fitness among treat-

ments was highly significant (Table 3A); mean cumulative fit-

ness of the distant within-forest treatment was 4–25 times the

means for other hand-pollination treatments and twice that of



1046

[Vol. 88


A

MERICAN


J

OURNAL OF

B

OTANY


Fig. 3.

Percentage germination of seeds derived from six crossing exper-

iments using (a) Syzygium rubicundum and (b) Shorea cordifolia. Mean, high,

and low values for three maternal trees are shown for each species. Pooled

sample sizes are shown in parentheses. Shared superscripts indicate no sig-

nificant difference between means. Germination was monitored in a green-

house for 120 d and 35 d for S. rubicundum and Sh. cordifolia, respectively.

For S. rubicundum, percentage germination estimates for open-pollinated

seeds were obtained from a separate study (Stacy, Harischandran, and Gun-

atilleke, in press).

Fig. 4.

Box plots of plant height at



ϳ1 yr post-emergence for seedlings

derived from crossing experiments with (a) Syzygium rubicundum and (b)



Shorea cordifolia. Solid squares and boxes indicate mean values

Ϯ 1 SE;


whiskers show high and low data points. Pooled sample sizes are shown in

parentheses. Shared superscripts indicate no significant difference between

means. For S. rubicundum, the SELF treatment comprised only a single seed-

ling (34.0 cm in height) and is not shown.

open-pollinated flowers. The relationship between outcrossing

distance and cumulative fitness was nearly significant (qua-

dratic regression: F

2,10


ϭ 3.84, ϭ 0.056). Mean cumulative

fitness (relative) was not significantly different between the

distant between-forest treatment (mean

ϭ 0.07) and all within-

forest outcrossed classes combined (mean

ϭ 0.24, F

1,12

ϭ

1.69, P



ϭ 0.219), due to the strong near-neighbor effect on

cumulative fitness.

For Sh. cordifolia, cumulative fitness was maximum at both

the distant neighbor and distant within-forest treatments (Fig.

5). Peak cumulative fitness observed for these intermediate

crossing treatments was 2 and 4.3 times the cumulative fit-

nesses of the nearest-neighbor and distant between-forest treat-

ments, respectively, although these differences were not sig-

nificant (Table 3B). The relationship between outcrossing dis-

tance and cumulative fitness was not significant (quadratic re-

gression: F

2,8


ϭ 3.70, ϭ 0.073). Mean cumulative fitness of

open-pollinated flowers exceeded that of all other hand-polli-

nation treatments, again likely due to the detrimental effect of

the hand-pollination procedure on fruit set in this species. As

for fruit set, mean cumulative fitness (relative) of the distant

between-forest treatment (mean

ϭ 0.12) was significantly low-

er than that of all within-forest outcrossed classes combined

(mean

ϭ 0.51, F



1,12

ϭ 8.77, ϭ 0.012).



Inbreeding and outbreeding depression—For each mater-

nal tree, the consequences of nearest-neighbor and long-dis-

tance mating were estimated through indices of biparental in-


June 2001]

1047


S

TACY


—C

ROSS


-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

Fig. 5.

Cumulative indices of crossing fitness for (a) Syzygium rubicun-



dum and (b) Shorea cordifolia. Mean, high, and low values for three maternal

trees are shown for each species. Pooled sample sizes are shown in parenthe-

ses. Shared superscripts indicate no significant difference between means.

Each index equals the standardized product of proportion fruit set, proportion

seed germination, proportion seedling survivorship, and relative height at 1

yr (i.e., height relative to the tallest seedling present). Per-treatment mean

seedling survivorship rates were substituted for actual treatment-by-maternal

tree means, as the latter, due to small samples sizes, were not robust.

Fig. 6.

Mean (


Ϯ1 SE) cumulative cost of mating with the nearest neighbor

(biparental inbreeding depression; open columns) and a pollen donor from a

separate forest reserve (outbreeding depression; shaded columns) for both

study species. Indices were calculated for each maternal tree as: 1

Ϫ (W

extreme


/

W

moderate


), such that W

ϭ mean cumulative fitness, ‘‘extreme’’ ϭ either nearest

neighbor (NNHBR) or distant between-forest (D-BF) cross, and ‘‘moderate’’

ϭ moderate-distance cross. Both indices can be calculated multiple ways,

depending on the definition of ‘‘moderate-distance cross’’ (i.e., for biparental

inbreeding, moderate

ϭ distant neighbor (DNHBR), or DNHBR and distant

within-forest (D-WF); for outbreeding depression: moderate

ϭ NNHBR and

DNHBR, or DNHBR and D-WF, or all three classes). To present an unbiased

picture of extreme-distance crossing effects, all possible values of each esti-

mate for each maternal tree are included. The number of values contributing

to each mean is shown in parentheses.

breeding depression and outbreeding depression, respectively,

based on cumulative fitness values. As the study species were

largely or completely self-infertile, inbreeding depression

through selfing was ignored. Biparental inbreeding depression

was strong but variable for S. rubicundum, for which mating

with the nearest neighbor represented an average fitness cost

of 45% (range

ϭ Ϫ46 to ϩ94%), relative to crossing with

moderately more distant neighbors (Fig. 6). For Sh. cordifolia,

the nearest-neighbor mating effect was more ambiguous and

variable across trees; combining all measures of crossing fit-

ness, inbreeding depression averaged close to zero (

Ϫ6%,


range

ϭ Ϫ109 to ϩ92%; Fig. 6). In contrast, the effect of

between-forest crossing was substantial for both species (mean

outbreeding depression

ϭ 52 and 70% for S. rubicundum and

Sh. cordifolia, respectively; Fig. 6).

Variation in expression of inbreeding and outbreeding

depression—Apparent crossing effects on fitness declined be-

tween the stages of fruit set and 1-yr-old seedling size. Of the

four fitness measures, only fruit set was influenced signifi-

cantly by crossing treatment. Due to the attrition in sample

sizes from the stage of mature seeds to 1-yr-old seedlings,

however, and the consequent large variation among treatment-

by-maternal tree classes in both seedling survivorship and

height, the power to detect treatment effects also decreased

over time. Accordingly, failure to observe significant crossing

effects on progeny fitness (seedling survivorship and growth

in particular) should not be considered conclusive.

DISCUSSION

The exceptionally low fruit set of selfed flowers of both

species may be due to strong inbreeding depression or to ge-

netic self-incompatibility (Bawa, 1992). If low self-fertility is

attributable to genetic incompatibility, the discrimination of

self-pollen is not complete for either species (S. rubicundum,

this study; Sh. cordifolia, Dayanandan et al., 1990). The pre-

dominant outcrossing observed for these trees is characteristic

of woody species throughout the tropics (e.g., Ashton, 1969;

Bawa, 1974, 1992; Chan, 1981; Bawa, Perry, and Beach,

1985; Dayanandan et al., 1990; Murawski and Hamrick, 1991;

Oliveira and Gibbs, 1994).

In addition to a striking and predictable selfing effect for

both species, the relationship between outcrossing distance and

fruit set was significant for each. Peak fruit set corresponded



1048

[Vol. 88


A

MERICAN


J

OURNAL OF

B

OTANY


to an outcrossing distance of

ϳ1–2 km. Although not statis-

tically significant, peak fruit set for S. rubicundum consistently

exceeded those of open-pollinated flowers, suggesting that the

bulk of the natural pollen distribution is restricted to distances

Ͻ1–2 km. More specifically, similarity between fruit set of

open-pollinated flowers and distant-neighbor crosses may in-

dicate that these trees naturally cross with mates occurring

very roughly within a radius of 80–500 m (the range of out-

crossing distances used in the distant-neighbor treatment). Un-

fortunately, as the hand-pollination procedure had a negative

impact on fruit set in Sh. cordifolia, comparisons of fruit set

rates or cumulative fitnesses between hand-pollination and

open-pollination treatments are not useful.

While outcrossing distance did not significantly affect the

remaining measures of crossing fitness, with few exceptions,

mean values of fitness measures followed a largely consistent

trend across treatments. For both species, mean values for all

measures gradually increased with crossing distance, peaking

at an intermediate distance (1–2 km for S. rubicundum and 1–

10 km for Sh. cordifolia), and then dropping at the between-

forest treatment. Departures from this trend are seen for seed

germination and seedling size in between-forest crosses of Sh.

cordifolia, which exceeded the mean values for all other treat-

ments, including the open-pollinated treatment (see Hybrid



vigor in Shorea cordifolia below). When all fitness measures

were combined in cumulative fitness scores, however, the trend

of peak fitness at intermediate-distance, within-forest crosses

persisted for both species.



Near-neighbor crossing effect—The effect of nearest-

neighbor mating on cumulative fitness was significant for S.



rubicundum and persisted for crosses

Յ500 m (distant neigh-

bor treatment). Mean cumulative fitnesses of outcrosses

Յ500


m were 18–26% that of crosses 1–2 km in distance. For Sh.

cordifolia, mean cumulative fitness of nearest-neighbor crosses

was 50% that of within-forest crosses

Ն2 km. For both spe-

cies, the reduced fitness of near-neighbor crosses was due pri-

marily to reduced fruit set. As for selfing, reduced fruit set in

near-neighbor crosses may be due to inbreeding depression or

to genetic incompatibility. While the influence of genetic in-

compatibility was not tested here and therefore cannot be dis-

regarded outright, the consistently lower progeny fitnesses ob-

served for nearest-neighbor crosses relative to longer distance

crosses strongly suggest the influence of inbreeding depres-

sion. Furthermore, of the six maternal trees used, self-infertil-

ity was complete in Sh. cordifolia, but considerably less so in

S. rubicundum. Given complete self-infertility due to incom-

patibility in the three adult Sh. cordifolia, compromised fruit

set in nearest-neighbor crosses would be expected if cross-

incompatibility between neighboring plants is of the same ge-

netic basis as self-incompatibility. This expectation assumes

conspecific neighbors in logged forest are related. In contrast

to this expectation, fruit set from nearest-neighbor crosses was

not significantly compromised for Sh. cordifolia, as it was for



S. rubicundum. This finding suggests, for Sh. cordifolia at

least, that the contribution, if any, of genetic incompatibility

to reduced crossing success between neighboring trees is of

secondary importance to inbreeding depression.

The logged forest at Sinharaja afforded an ideal setting for

investigating the potential for biparental inbreeding depression

in natural stands of forest trees. The high light conditions in

the post-logging environment likely promoted regeneration of

high-density stands of related individuals, especially of the

light-demanding S. rubicundum (P. M. S. Ashton, personal

communication, Yale University). While apparent inbreeding

depression in near-neighbor crosses was significant for S. rub-



icundum, its significance for Sh. cordifolia was more ambig-

uous, as the nearest-neighbor mating effect was highly variable

among the three maternal trees. Interspecific differences in ob-

served biparental inbreeding depression may result from in-

terspecific differences in the genetic relatedness of near-neigh-

bors in the study populations. Alternatively, the discrepancy

may be due to historical differences in the breeding structures

of the two species. While the species share similar stature and

pollinators (primarily bees), they possess very different modes

of seed dispersal (S. rubicundum, dispersal by birds or bats;



Sh. cordifolia, dispersal by wind or gyration). Because of dif-

ferences in dispersal potential, a history of biparental inbreed-

ing is expected for Sh. cordifolia, but not for S. rubicundum.

As biparental inbreeding depression is expected to be most

intense for populations with little natural inbreeding in their

recent evolutionary history (and thus little opportunity for the

purging of deleterious recessive alleles; Heywood, 1993), in-

breeding depression from nearest-neighbor crosses in logged

forest should have been greater for S. rubicundum than for Sh.

cordifolia, as was observed. Planned microsatellite-based stud-

ies of fine-scale genetic structure in the study populations will

permit evaluation of this conclusion through an interspecific

comparison of patterns of relatedness among neighboring

trees.

Results of this study indicate that the potential for signifi-



cant biparental inbreeding effects is strong for tree popula-

tions, when neighboring trees are related. The degree of in-

breeding depression experienced by a population, however,

will vary among species, possibly as a function of their recent

evolutionary histories. While the significant, and near signifi-

cant, cumulative fitness effects of nearest-neighbor mating ob-

served for the two study species in logged forest indicate the

potential for such effects in natural stands, both the actual

degree of relatedness among near-neighbors and the degree of

biparental inbreeding depression experienced in undisturbed

forest remain to be determined.

Near-neighbor crossing effects have been demonstrated for

a number of coniferous species (Coles and Fowler, 1976; Park

and Fowler, 1982, 1984; Latta et al., 1998), but only three

studies have yielded evidence of near-neighbor crossing effects

in woody angiosperms (Syzygium cormiflorum—Crome and Ir-

vine, 1986; Schiedea spp.—Sakai, Karoly, and Weller, 1989;

Eucalyptus globules—Hardner, Potts, and Gore, 1998). In an-

other study suggestive of biparental inbreeding depression,

mean fruit set rates were significantly lower for intraspecific

crosses


Ͻ0.5 km distance than for crosses Ͼ1 km distance for

three subcanopy tree species (Inga spp.) in Costa Rica (Koptur,

1984). In fact, it may be that biparental inbreeding depression

is common in natural populations of forest trees, but that es-

timation of its potential through experimental cross-pollina-

tions has been limited to only a few species due to the obvious

difficulty of working in the canopy. To my knowledge, there

are no published reports of failed attempts to find near-neigh-

bor crossing effects in natural populations of forest trees.

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə