Evidence of inbreeding depression within populations and genetic divergence among populations



Yüklə 272.48 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/4
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü272.48 Kb.
1   2   3   4
Between-forest crossing effect—For both species, cumula-

tive fitness dropped significantly between long-distance cross-

es within Sinharaja to crosses involving separate forest pop-

ulations. This between-forest crossing effect was consistent be-

tween species in spite of the large interspecific difference in


June 2001]

1049


S

TACY


—C

ROSS


-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

dispersal potential. For both species, variation in fruit set

among maternal trees was least for the between-forest crosses,

suggesting a universal poor interfertility between trees occur-

ring in separate forest reserves.

Mechanisms underlying outbreeding depression may be of

a genetic or an ecological nature (Price and Waser, 1979;

Shields, 1982). Outbreeding depression involving between-

population crosses is most often ascribed to the genetic mech-

anism involving disruption of coadapted gene complexes

(Templeton, 1986). According to this model, intrinsic coad-

aptation involving relatively few loci develops through re-

stricted gene flow among populations and genetic drift within

populations (Templeton, 1981; Schierup and Christiansen,

1996). Crossing disparate genomes results in outbreeding de-

pression through the disruption of coadaptation between ho-

mologous chromosomes in the F

1

generation and between co-



adapted portions of individual chromosomes in F

2

progeny.



The outbreeding depression observed in this study, which was

restricted to between-forest crosses over 12- and 35-km dis-

tances, may be explained in part by disruption of intrinsic co-

adaptation. The observation of hybrid vigor in seedlings of Sh.



cordifolia is also consistent with this model (Templeton, 1986;

see below).

In contrast, the ecological mechanism for outbreeding de-

pression involves reduced fitness of wide outcrosses due to

adaptation to local biotic and abiotic conditions, such that wide

outcrossing yields F

1

progeny with alleles maladapted to either



of the parental environments (Endler, 1977). Although selec-

tion-driven divergence is typically associated with intrapopu-

lation outbreeding depression (e.g., Waser and Price, 1989),

selection-driven divergence between populations seems a plau-

sible contributor to the reduced interfertility between popula-

tions observed in this study. Through direct selection on fitness

traits, habitat heterogeneity will promote genetic differentia-

tion within and among plant populations (Jain and Bradshaw,

1966; Linhart and Grant, 1996). The considerable environ-

mental heterogeneity of southwest Sri Lanka is likely suffi-

cient to cause genetic differentiation of tree populations over

a scale of tens of kilometers. The ridge and valley system of

southwest Sri Lanka comprises elevations ranging from 300

m to


Ͼ1000 m. Across elevations, variation in temperature,

cloudiness, and rainfall (

Ͻ2500–5000 cm) occurs (Gunatilleke

et al., 1998).

The apparent outbreeding depression observed in fruit set

and cumulative fitness for between-forest crosses in both spe-

cies indicates some degree of genetic isolation among tree

populations occupying the separate forest reserves of Sri Lan-

ka’s wet zone. This result is somewhat surprising given the

large stature of the species and the small geographic area in-

volved, and it suggests that conditions favorable for speciation

in tropical trees may arise over a scale of only several to tens

of kilometers. The geographical heterogeneity of southwest Sri

Lanka, however, may be of a finer scale than that of the ma-

jority of tropical forested landscapes (Ashton and Gunatilleke,

1987). It would be desirable to see whether poor cross-fertility

between forests is universal for tree species in the wet zone.

Unfortunately, plans to continue this study in 1998, and to

include other species of Syzygium and Shorea, were thwarted

due to a general lack of flowering in the region that year. From

a conservation perspective, observation of even minor repro-

ductive isolation between forest reserves suggests that even

where tree species are shared among reserves, each forest rep-

resents a singular genetic resource worthy of preservation.

Outbreeding depression was not detected in crosses over

what is presumably the normal range of pollen flow for either

species. The lack of evidence of outbreeding depression within

continuous-forest populations in this study is consistent with

the literature in which examples of between-population out-

breeding depression in plants far outnumber those of within-

population outbreeding depression. Given the recent nature of

deforestation north of Sinharaja, however, delineation of S.



rubicundum into separate populations in the Sinharaja and

Walankanda Reserves may not accurately reflect the recent

demographic history of this species. Walankanda and Sinha-

raja Reserves were part of one continuous forest until only

30–40 yr ago (P. S. Ashton, personal communication, Harvard

University). This is probably less than the generation time for

these trees and indicates the potential for recent genetic con-

nectivity between the two populations. As S. rubicundum is

generally restricted to mid-slope areas, however, it is likely

that this species was not present in abundance in the valley

between Sinharaja and Walankanda Reserves prior to the

clearing of forest in that area (P. S. Ashton, personal com-

munication, Harvard University). Regardless, the two forests

are separated at present by a deforested strip only 4 km wide.

Gene flow between tree populations occupying these forests

since the separation is therefore at least plausible (e.g., White,

Powell, and Boshier, 1998). For these reasons, observation of

outbreeding depression in crosses between tree populations oc-

cupying Sinharaja and Walankanda Reserves is unexpected,

and it indicates that genetic divergence of tree populations can

occur over very short distances even in continuous habitat.

Hybrid vigor in Shorea cordifolia—For Sh. cordifolia,

trends observed among treatments for seed germination rate

and seedling height suggest hybrid vigor or luxuriance in prog-

eny derived from between-forest crosses. This finding is ten-

tative, however, due to the small sample sizes involved with

the between-forest crosses for the seed germination and later

stages. Hybrid vigor in F

1

progeny is consistent with the model



for outbreeding depression through the disruption of coadapted

gene complexes. According to this model, F

1

hybrid vigor re-



sults from increased heterozygosity, with subsequent hybrid

breakdown in the F

2

generation from the disruption of parental



genomes during F

1

gametogenesis (Templeton, 1986). It re-



mains to be seen whether hybrid vigor can occur at some level

of genetic differentiation between mates without subsequent

F

2

breakdown (Shields, 1982). Hybrid vigor in interpopulation



crosses followed by a drop in F

2

fitness has been reported for



several herbaceous species (e.g., Clausen, 1951; Kruckeberg,

1957; Vickery, 1959; Grant and Grant, 1960; Gottlieb, 1971;

Grant, 1971; Hughes and Vickery, 1974; Price and Waser,

1979). In woody angiosperms, hybrid vigor in interpopulation

crosses has been documented for at least one species, Syzygium

cormiflorum, a subcanopy species of Australia’s rainforests

(Crome and Irvine, 1986). Unfortunately, due to the long gen-

eration times of trees, study of F

2

generations in these species



is usually not feasible.

Timing of inbreeding and outbreeding depression—Evi-

dence of inbreeding and outbreeding effects decreased be-

tween the stages of fruit set and 1-yr-old seedlings. This find-

ing is tentative, however, as the power to detect crossing ef-

fects also declined over the same period. In their review of

the timing of inbreeding depression in plants, Husband and

Schemske (1996) concluded that for outcrossing species, in-


1050

[Vol. 88


A

MERICAN


J

OURNAL OF

B

OTANY


breeding depression is greatest for the stages of seed set and

growth and reproduction, and much less important for seed

germination. Results of this study are consistent with the gen-

eral conclusion that embryo abortion is an important, if not

primary, component of inbreeding depression in outcrossing

plants (e.g., Levin, 1984, 1989).

Little is known of the timing of outbreeding depression in

plants. Within the confines of the fitness measures used in this

study, the results are consistent with the findings of McCall,

Mitchell-Old, and Waller (1991) of optimal outcrossing in Im-



patiens capensis in which the effect of intermate distance de-

creased between the stages of mature seeds and offspring sex-

ual maturity. Both studies agree with Husband and Schemske’s

(1996) consensus for inbreeding depression that crossing ef-

fects are most notable at the stage of seed set and less so at

the stages of seed germination and early seedling growth (but

see Waser and Price, 1989). Low inbreeding depression ob-

served in germination and survival might be due to the short

duration of, and few genes involved in, these stages relative

to the stages of seed maturation and reproduction (Husband

and Schemske, 1996).

Viewed together, the theories of inbreeding and outbreeding

depression predict that there should exist some intermediate

crossing distance between mates at which both inbreeding and

outbreeding depression are avoided (i.e., the ‘‘optimal out-

crossing distance’’ of Price and Waser, 1979; and Waser and

Price, 1983). Optimal outcrossing refers to those crosses that

achieve greatest reproductive fitness relative to other crosses

and therefore signal optimal genetic compatibility between

mates. Little is known of optimal outcrossing in woody spe-

cies. Although identifying an optimal outcrossing distance was

not an objective of this study, the results indicate that optimal

outcrossing for canopy species in tropical forests may occur

over a range of roughly one to several kilometers. While track-

ing pollen flow at this spatial scale in continuous forest is

exceedingly difficult, a handful of recent studies have dem-

onstrated at least low levels of natural cross-pollinations over

distances of one, or in some cases, several kilometers in trop-

ical trees (Nason, Herre, and Hamrick, 1996, 1998; Nason and

Hamrick, 1997; Apsit, 1998; White, Powell, and Boshier,

1998). Outcrossing distance alone, however, does not explain

variation in crossing success for the two study species. Similar

outcrossing distances yielded very different results in the two

species (high fitness at 10 km for Sh. cordifolia and very low

fitness at 12 km for S. rubicundum). Rather, for these trees,

the critical determinant of crossing success over long distances

appears to be whether or not mates occur within the same

forest reserve.



Summary of conclusions—For two tree species in Sri Lan-

ka’s wet zone forests, fruit set increased significantly with out-

crossing distance, peaking at intermediate-distance within-for-

est crosses (1–10 km depending on species). In crosses be-

tween trees occupying separate forest reserves, however, fruit

set was significantly reduced (or nearly so) for both species.

In contrast, seed germination and seedling height at 1 yr for

Sh. cordifolia suggested hybrid vigor in between-forest cross-

es. The effects of nearest-neighbor mating varied among trees

and species; the mean fitness cost of nearest-neighbor mating

relative to mating with moderately more distant neighbors was

45% for S. rubicundum and 0% for Sh. cordifolia. In contrast,

the fitness effects of between-forest crossing were substantial

for both species (52 and 70% relative to within-forest crosses

for the same two species). Crossing effects diminished be-

tween the stages of fruit set and 1-yr-old seedling size; only

the former was significant for both species. Results indicate a

strong potential for biparental inbreeding depression within

forest tree populations and partial reproductive isolation

among trees occupying the remaining forest reserves in Sri

Lanka’s wet zone.

LITERATURE CITED

A

PSIT



, V. J. 1998. Fragmentation and pollen movement in a Costa Rican dry

forest tree species. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Georgia, Athens,

Georgia, USA.

A

SHTON



, P. S. 1969. Speciation among tropical forest trees: some deductions

in the light of recent evidence. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society

1: 155–196.

———,


AND

I. A. U. N. G

UNATILLEKE

. 1987. New light on the plant ge-

ography of Ceylon I. Historical plant geography. Journal of Biogeog-

raphy 14: 249–285.

B

ATESON



, P. P. G. 1978. Sexual imprinting and optimal outbreeding. Nature

273: 259–260.

B

AWA


, K. S. 1974. Breeding systems of tree species of a lowland tropical

community. Evolution 28: 85–92.

———. 1992. Mating systems, genetic differentiation and speciation in trop-

ical rain forest plants. Biotropica 24: 250–255.

———, D. R. P

ERRY


,

AND


J. H. B

EACH


. 1985. Reproductive biology of

tropical lowland rain forest trees. I. Sexual systems and incompatibility

mechanisms. American Journal of Botany 72: 331–345.

B

ERG



, E. E.,

AND


J. L. H

AMRICK


. 1995. Fine-scale genetic structure of a

turkey oak forest. Evolution 49: 110–120.

B

OSHIER


, D. H., M. R. C

HASE


,

AND


K. S. B

AWA


. 1995. Population genetics

of (Cordia alliodora) (Boraginaceae), a Neotropical tree. III. Gene flow,

neighborhood, and population structure. American Journal of Botany 82:

484–490.


B

YERS


, D. L. 1998. Effect of cross proximity on progeny fitness in a rare

and a common species of Eupatorium (Asteraceae). American Journal



of Botany 85: 644–653.

C

HAN



, H. T. 1981. Reproductive biology of some Malaysian Dipterocarps.

III. Breeding systems. Malaysian Forester 44: 28–36.

C

LAUSEN


, J. 1951. Stages in the evolution of plant species. Hafner, New York,

New York, USA.

C

OLES


, J. F.,

AND


D. P. F

OWLER


. 1976. Inbreeding in neighboring trees in

two white spruce populations. Silvae Genetica 25: 29–34.

C

ROME


, F. H. J.,

AND


A. K. I

RVINE


. 1986. ‘‘Two bob each way’’: the polli-

nation and breeding system of the Australian rain forest tree Syzygium



cormiflorum (Myrtaceae). Biotropica 18: 115–125.

D

AYANANDAN



, S., D. N. C. A

TTYGALA


, A. W. W. L. A

BEYGUNASEKERA

, I.

A. U. N. G



UNATILLEKE

,

AND



C. V. S. G

UNATILLEKE

. 1990. Phenology

and floral morphology in relation to pollination of some Sri Lankan Dip-

terocarps. In K. S. Bawa and M. Hadley [eds.], Reproductive ecology of

tropical forest plants, UNESCO, Man and Biosphere series, vol. 7, 103–

133. Paris and Parthenon Publishing Group, Carnforth, UK.

D

EWEY



, S. E.,

AND


J. S. H

EYWOOD


. 1988. Spatial genetic structure in a

population of Psychotria nervosa. I. Distribution of genotypes. Evolution

42: 834–838.

E

NDLER



, J. A. 1977. Geographic variation, speciation, and clines. Princeton

University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA.

———. 1979. Gene flow and life history patterns. Genetics 93: 263–284.

E

PPERSON



, B. K.,

AND


M. T. C

LEGG


. 1986. Spatial-autocorrelation analysis

of flower color polymorphisms within substructured populations of morn-

ing glory (Ipomoea purpurea). American Naturalist 128: 840–858.

F

EDOROV



, A. A. 1966. The structure of the tropical rain forest and speciation

in the humid tropics. Journal of Ecology 54: 1–11.

F

ISCHER


, M.,

AND


D. M

ATTHIES


. 1997. Mating structure and inbreeding and

outbreeding depression in the rare plant Gentianella germanica (Gen-

tianaceae). American Journal of Botany 84: 1685–1692.

G

OTTLIEB



, L. D. 1971. Evolutionary relationships in outcrossing diploid an-

nual species of Stephanomeria (Compositae). Evolution 25: 312–329.

G

RANT


, V. 1971. Plant speciation. Columbia University, New York, New

York, USA.

———,

AND


A. G

RANT


. 1960. Genetic and taxonomic studies in Gilia XI.

Fertility relationships of the diploid cobwebby Gilias. Aliso 4: 435–481.



June 2001]

1051


S

TACY


—C

ROSS


-

FERTILITY IN TWO TROPICAL TREE SPECIES

G

UNATILLEKE



, C. V. S.,

AND


I. A. U. N. G

UNATILLEKE

. 1980. The floristic

composition of Sinharaja—a rain forest in Sri Lanka with special refer-

ence to endemics. Sri Lankan Forester 14: 171–180.

G

UNATILLEKE



, C. V. S., I. A. U. N. G

UNATILLEKE

, P. M. S. A

SHTON


,

AND


P.

S. A


SHTON

. 1998. Seedling growth of Shorea (Dipterocarpaceae) across

an elevational range in southwest Sri Lanka. Journal of Tropical Ecology

14: 231–245.

H

AMRICK


, J. L., D. A. M

URAWSKI


,

AND


J. D. N

ASON


. 1993. The influence

of seed dispersal mechanisms on the genetic structure of tropical tree

populations. Vegetatio 107/108: 281–297.

H

ARDNER



, C. M., B. M. P

OTTS


,

AND


P. L. G

ORE


. 1998. The relationship

between cross success and spatial proximity of Eucalyptus globulus ssp.



globulus parents. Evolution 52: 614–618.

H

EYWOOD



, J. S. 1993. Biparental inbreeding depression in the self-incom-

patible annual Gaillardia pulchella (Asteraceae). American Journal of



Botany 80: 545–550.

H

UGHES



, K. W.,

AND


R. K. V

ICKERY


, J

R

. 1974. Patterns of heterosis and



crossing barriers resulting from increasing genetic distance between pop-

ulations of the Mimulus luteus complex. Journal of Genetics 61: 235–

245.

H

USBAND



, B. C.,

AND


D. W. S

CHEMSKE


. 1996. Evolution of the magnitude

and timing of inbreeding depression in plants. Evolution 50: 54–70.

J

AIN


, S. K.,

AND


A. D. B

RADSHAW


. 1966. Evolutionary divergence among

adjacent plant populations. 1. The evidence and its theoretical analysis.



Heredity 20: 407–441.

K

OPTUR



, S. 1984. Outcrossing and pollinator limitation of fruit set: breeding

systems of neotropical Inga trees (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae). Evolution

38: 1130–1143.

K

RUCKEBERG



, A. R. 1957. Variation in fertility of hybrids between isolated

populations of the serpentine species, Streptanthus glandulosus Hook.



Evolution 11: 185–211.

L

ATTA



, R. G., Y. B. L

INHART


, D. F

LECK


,

AND


M. E

LLIOT


. 1998. Direct and

indirect estimates of seed versus pollen movement within a population

of ponderosa pine. Evolution 52: 61–67.

L

EVIN



, D. A. 1984. Inbreeding depression and proximity-dependent crossing

success in Phlox drummondii. Evolution 38: 116–127.

———. 1989. Proximity-dependent cross-compatibility in Phlox. Evolution

43: 1114–1116.

———,

AND


H. W. K

ERSTER


. 1974. Gene flow in seed plants. Evolutionary

Biology 7: 139–220.

L

INHART



, Y. B. 1973. Ecological and behavioral determinants of pollen dis-

persal in hummingbird-pollinated Heliconia. American Naturalist 107:

511–523.

———,


AND

M. C. G


RANT

. 1996. Evolutionary significance of local genetic

differentiation in plants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 27:

237–278.


L

OVELESS


, M. D.,

AND


J. L. H

AMRICK


. 1984. Ecological determinants of

genetic structure in plant populations. Annual Review of Ecology and



Systematics 15: 65–95.

M

C



C

ALL


, C., T. M

ITCHELL


-O

LDS


,

AND


D. M. W

ALLER


. 1988. Might a plant

that often selfs have an optimal out-crossing distance? Bulletin of the



Ecological Society of America 69: 223.

———, ———,

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə