Extinction Risk and Population Declines in Amphibians



Yüklə 4.8 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/13
tarix12.08.2017
ölçüsü4.8 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

 

 
 
 Extinction Risk and Population 
Declines in Amphibians 
 
 
Jon Bielby 
 
Imperial College London, 
Division of Biology, 
 
 
 
A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at 
Imperial College London  
 
– May 2008
 

 

 
Thesis abstract
 
This thesis is about understanding the processes that explain the patterns of 
extinction risk and declines that we see in amphibians, how we can use that 
understanding to set conservation priorities, and how we can convert those 
priorities into practical, hands-on research and management.  In particular, I 
focus on the threat posed by the emerging infectious disease, 
chytridiomycosis, which is caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium 
dendrobatidis (Bd). 
 
Amphibians display a non-random pattern of extinction risk, both 
taxonomically and geographically.  In chapter two I investigate the mechanism 
behind the observed taxonomic selectivity and find that it is due to species 
biology rather than heterogeneity in either threat intensity or conservation 
knowledge. 
 
In chapter three I determine which biological and environmental traits are 
important in rendering a species susceptible to declines, focussing on 
susceptibility to Bd.  I found that restricted range, high elevation species with 
an aquatic life-stage are more likely to have suffered a decline.  Using these 
traits, I predict species and locations that may be susceptible in the future, 
and which should therefore be a high priority for amphibian research and 
conservation. 
 

 

The use of predictive models to set conservation priorities relies on the 
accuracy of the modelling technique used.  In chapter four I compare the 
predictive performance of both phylogenetic and nonphylogenetic regression 
and decision trees, and assess the suitability of each technique.  Although 
phylogenetic regression provided the most predictive models of extinction risk 
and decline, decision trees could be a useful tool in future studies. 
 
Once high priority species or locations have been identified as susceptible to 
Bd, what should be the next step?  In chapter five I identify highly susceptible 
species that have suffered an increase in extinction risk as a result of threat 
processes other than chytridiomycosis, and investigate the potential role of 
the disease in their decline.  I find that the historical range of one of the four 
species investigated does harbour Bd at a relatively high prevalence, which 
suggests that structured surveillance of Bd in this location, and further 
investigation of the role of chytridiomycosis in the species’ decline would be 
warranted. 
 
In chapter six I describe such a structured, opportunistic screening for Bd on 
the island of Sardinia.  I assess the threat that chytridiomycosis may pose to 
the threatened and endemic species of Sardinia and discuss future research 
directions and conservation needs of the island’s amphibians. 
 
 
 
 

 

Declaration 
All of the work presented in this thesis is mine, with the following 
acknowledgements:  
 
Chapter two 
This chapter was published as a senior authored paper in Animal 
Conservation (Bielby, Cunningham, & Purvis, 2006, Animal Conservation, 
9,135-143).  The main idea behind the paper was my own, although Andy 
Purvis provided guidance on how to conduct the analyses.  Olivia Curno, 
Sanjay Molur, Shawn McCracken of 
www.tadpole.org
, Ronald Nussbaum of 
the University of Michigan, Rohan Pethiyagoda of the Wildlife Heritage Trust 
of Sri Lanka, Mark-Oliver Rödel, staff at Jatun Sacha research centre, Bruce 
Young of NatureServe helped with gathering site species check-lists.  All 
aspects of data collection and collation, analysis, interpretation and writing are 
my own. 
 
Chapter three 
This chapter was published as a senior authored paper in Conservation 
Letters (Bielby, Cooper, Cunningham, Garner & Purvis, Conservation Letters, 
in press).  Natalie Cooper helped collect the data used in the analysis, and 
Andy Purvis provided guidance on the statistical techniques used.  Tim 
Coulson provided advice on the statistical methods used.  Emmanuel Paradis 
provided advice on the use of compare.gee function.  S. Blair Hedges, 
Roberto Ibanez, Andres Merino-Viteri, Eugenia del Pino, Santiago Ron, and 
Tej Kumar Shrestha all helped in compiling data on the number of eggs per 

 

clutch.  The idea behind the chapter and all aspects of data analysis, 
interpretation and writing are my own.   
 
Chapter four 
The ideas behind the analyses in this chapter were developed by me with 
guidance from Andy Purvis.  Natalie Cooper and Marcel Cardillo provided 
some of the phylogenetic comparative analyses presented in the chapter, and 
are acknowledged accordingly.  The amphibian dataset underpinning the 
analyses were collected by me in collaboration with Natalie Cooper.  The 
mammalian data analysed in the chapter was collected as part of the 
PanTheria project.  All aspects of data analysis, interpretation and writing are 
my own. 
 
Chapter five 
The main idea behind this chapter is my own.  Patricia Burrowes, Rafael 
Joglar, and Abel Vale helped with the field work conducted in Puerto Rico.  
Tissue samples from amphibians were provided by Stefan Lötters, Trent 
Garner, and Thomas Doherty-Bone.  Barry Clarke allowed access to the NHM 
collection.  Frankie Clare helped to process the laboratory samples.  All 
aspects of data interpretation and writing are my own. 
 
Chapter six 
A grant awarded to Trent Garner, Stefano Bovero from the People’s Trust for 
Endangered Species provided funding for this chapter.  The Sardinian NGO 
Zirrichiltaggi and their associates provided invaluable logistical help, sausage, 

 

cheese and wine that proved essential for the fieldwork conducted in Sardinia.  
The Forestry workers and managers of Sardinia also provided invaluable 
support during my time on the island.  Frankie Clare helped with the 
processing of the laboratory samples.  All aspects of analysis, interpretation 
and writing are my own.  

 

Acknowledgements 
 
Thanks to NERC for the funding that made my doctoral research possible.  
Also thanks to a grant from PTES which funded the work on Sardinia 
presented in this thesis. 
 
Thanks also to Simon Stuart and Janice Chanson provided help with use of 
the Global Amphibian Assessment database. 
 
To start with, big thanks to my supervision team, Andrew, Trent, and Andy.  
Before I started, someone pointed out that by the end I’d almost certainly hate 
my supervisors at least a little bit.  Well, I can honestly say that has not 
happened as yet.  Maybe after the viva.  Thanks in particular to Andy, who 
I’ve now known for a long time, and who has given me real guidance, direction 
and confidence over the past few years. 
 
A famous writer once said: “All first drafts are shit.  They are, however, 
necessary shit.”  So a big thank you to all of the people who in the last three 
and a half years have read through the necessary and highlighted my 
“opportunistic” use of commas, my generally misuse of semi-colons, my 
chess-like use of paragraphs (“hhhmmm, I’ve not used the knight for a while, 
now seems like a good time”), my over-use of hyphens, and my generally 
poor grammar.  These people include the many members of the Purvis lab 

 

(too many to mention/remember) since 2004, and also Amanda Duffus, and 
Andrew King. 
 
There are, of course, periods of time during a PhD when all sense of reality 
goes out of the window.  In those times, my mates were there to see me 
through.  Thanks to all of those at Silwood, IoZ, and the Real World who have 
slapped me back down to earth every so often.  Charlie, Shaun, Jimmy, Matty 
and Neil have always given me a sense of perspective when needed; thanks 
lads.  Also, special thanks go to:  Guy Cowlishaw who has helped me hold it 
together on a couple of occasions when I was about to come apart at the 
seams; 1001 shukrans to Trent and Dina who were basically always there for 
me, and fed me fish and wine when I dropped by like The Littlest Hobo; Ben 
and Janna who always had a pie on hand in case of an emergency; and a 
special firm-handshake to my office-mates for much of my PhD, Kingy and 
Amber who’ve……well, let’s not get all emotional.  But thanks. 
 
Finally thanks to all of my family who’ve provided support, interest and 
encouragement.  In particular, thanks to Auntie Jan and Uncle Ron for those 
days as Little Switzerland catching newts and eating Drewery’s hot-cakes.  
That’s pretty much where it all started, so thank you for being around and 
being interested and transferring some of your enthusiasm and energy to me.  
And finally thanks to Mum, Dad and Ali, because all this PhD really represents 
is me doing things that I like and care about and enjoy, and that’s what you’ve 
always encouraged me to do.  Thank you. 

 

Table of Contents 
Thesis abstract...............................................................................................2
 
Declaration .....................................................................................................4
 
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................7
 
Table of Contents...........................................................................................9
 
List of Tables................................................................................................ 12
 
List of Figures .............................................................................................. 14
 
List of Appendices....................................................................................... 15
 
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations………………………………………….16 
 
Chapter 1: General Introduction ................................................................. 18
 
Chapter 2:  Taxonomic Selectivity in Amphibians: Ignorance, Geography 
or Biology? ................................................................................................... 28
 
Abstract ........................................................................................... 28
 
Introduction..................................................................................... 29
 
Methods........................................................................................... 32
 
Data ...................................................................................... 32
 
Analyses................................................................................ 35
 
Results ............................................................................................ 37
 
Discussion ...................................................................................... 38
 
Tables .............................................................................................. 44
 
Appendix ......................................................................................... 53
 
Chapter 3:  Predicting susceptibility to future declines in the world’s 
frogs .............................................................................................................. 60
 
Abstract ........................................................................................... 60
 
Introduction..................................................................................... 61
 
Methods........................................................................................... 65
 
Data ...................................................................................... 65
 
Analyses................................................................................ 67
 
Results ............................................................................................ 71
 
Discussion ...................................................................................... 72
 
Tables .............................................................................................. 79
 
Figure .............................................................................................. 83
 

 
10 
Appendices ..................................................................................... 84
 
Chapter 4:  Modelling extinction risk in multispecies data sets: 
phylogenetically independent contrasts vs. decision trees................... 113
 
Abstract ......................................................................................... 113
 
Introduction................................................................................... 114
 
Methods......................................................................................... 119
 
Data .................................................................................... 119
 
Analyses.............................................................................. 121
 
Predictive performance......................................................... 124
 
Results .......................................................................................... 126
 
Discussion .................................................................................... 129
 
Tables ............................................................................................ 134
 
Figure ............................................................................................ 137
 
Appendices ................................................................................... 138
 
Chapter 5:  Ground-testing a predictive model of Bd-susceptibility with 
the aim of directing further research. ...................................................... 161
 
Abstract ......................................................................................... 161
 
Introduction................................................................................... 162
 
Methods......................................................................................... 165
 
Target species ..................................................................... 165
 
Collection of samples ........................................................... 168
 
Type of tissue samples taken................................................ 168
 
Molecular screening of samples ............................................ 171
 
Results .......................................................................................... 171
 
Discussion .................................................................................... 173
 
Tables ............................................................................................ 181
 
Appendix ....................................................................................... 185
 
Chapter 6:  Distribution and epidemiology of Batrachochytrium 
dendrobatidis on the Mediterranean island of Sardinia. ........................ 186
 
Abstract ......................................................................................... 186
 
Introduction................................................................................... 187
 
Methods......................................................................................... 191
 
Study system ....................................................................... 191
 

 
11 
Sample sizes ....................................................................... 192
 
Target Species..................................................................... 192
 
Collection and field hygiene .................................................. 194
 
Laboratory techniques .......................................................... 195
 
Results .......................................................................................... 195
 
Discussion .................................................................................... 198
 
Table .............................................................................................. 205
 
Figures .......................................................................................... 206
 
Chapter 7:  General Conclusions ............................................................. 212
 
References.................................................................................................. 221
 
 

 
12 
List of Tables 
 
Table 2.1: Results of chi-square test for random distribution of threatened 
species at the global level, and subsequent analysis of distribution of 
threatened species between amphibian families after the omission of DD 
species…………………………………………………………………….. 44 
 
Table 2.2: Results of country level Fisher’s exact test and subsequent 
analysis of distribution of threatened species between amphibian families after 
the omission of DD species………………………………………………46 
 
Table 2.3:  Results of site level Fisher’s exact test analysis, and subsequent 
analysis of distribution of threatened species between amphibian families after 
the omission of DD species………………………………………………50 
 
Table 2.4:  Combined p-values obtained from Fisher’s method, illustrating the 
tendency for families to be over- or under-threatened within different 
countries……………………………………………………………………52 
 
Table 3.1:  Results of univariate and multipredictor analyses of RD species vs. 
threatened species………………………………………………………..79 
 
Table 3.2:  Results of univariate and multipredictor analysis of enigmatic RD 
species vs. threatened species…………………………………………. 80 
 
Table 3.3:  Results of univariate and multipredictor analysis of Bd
+
 RD species 
vs. all other Bd 
+
 species………………………………………………….81 
 
Table 3.4:  Results of univariate and multipredictor analysis of Bd
+
 RD species 
vs  Bd 
-
 RD species………………………………………………………. 82 
 

 
13 
Table 4.1:  Details of the comparisons made and the optimal tree size for 
each.……………………………………………………………………….134 
Table 4.2:  Summary of technique performance in terms of consistency, 
precision, and presence of a phylogenetic signal…………………….. 135 
 
Table 4.3:  Interaction terms added to the PCM regression models based on 
the corresponding DT………………………………………………….....136 
 
Table 5.1:  Summary of Bd surveillance results for Bufo brauni……. 181 
 
Table 5.2:  Summary of Bd surveillance results for Bufo lemur at El Tallonal, 
Puerto Rico………………………………………………………………...182 
 
Table 5.3:  Summary of Bd surveillance results for Hyperolius cystocandicans 
in central Kenya………………………………………………………….. 183 
 
Table 5.4:  Summary of Bd surveillance results for Xenopus longipes at Lake 
Oku, Cameroon…………………………………………………………... 184 
 
Table 6.1:  Details of populations of Sardinian amphibians sampled in the 
2007 field-season………………………………………………………… 205 

 
14 
List of Figures 
 
Fig. 3.1:  Global distribution of anuran species with a predicted probability of 
Bd -related decline =1…………………………………………………… 83 
 
Fig. 4.1:  Significant differences in MSE among techniques for each 
comparison……………………………………………….. ……………….137 
 
Fig. 6.1:  Locations of all Sardinian populations sampled in the 2007 field 
season……………………………………………………………………...206 
 
Fig. 6.2:  Locations of sampled populations in the southern Sette Fratelli 
mountain region of Sardinia…………………………………………….. 207 
 
Fig. 6.3:  One of 10 specimens of Euproctus platycephalus with damaged 
digits……………………………………………………………….. ………208 
 
Fig. 6.4:  Locations of sampled populations in the northern Limbara mountain 
region……………………………………………………………………… 209 
 
Fig. 6.5:  Locations of infected sites in the Limbara mountain region. 
…………………………………………………………………………....... 210 
Fig. 6.6:  Locations of sampled populations in the Gennargentu mountain 
region……………………………………………………………………… 211 

 
15 
List of Appendices 
 
Appendix 2.1:  Site species check-lists that were not suitable for analysis. 
………………………………………………………………………………53 
Appendix 3.1: References used in anuran data collection……………84 
 
Appendix 3.2:  List of Bd+ species………………………………………92 
 
Appendix 3.3:  Results of ANOVAs used to determine whether there were 
significant differences between anuran families in the explanatory variables 
used in the analyses……………………………………………….…….. 112 
 
Appendix 4.1:  Frog regression models…………….………….............138 
 
Appendix 4.2:  Mammalian regression models……………………….. 143 
 
Appendix 4.3:  Optimal decision tree models…………….…………….148 
 
Appendix 4.4:  Correlations coefficients of fitted values obtained from three 
different modelling techniques for ten different comparisons…………158 
 
Appendix 4.5:  Mean squared error of extinction risk models obtained from 
different modelling techniques for ten different clades………………..159     
 
Appendix 4.6:  Results of analysis of model residuals for phylogenetic signal. 
………………………………………………………………………………160 
Appendix 5.1. Sample size required for detecting disease where the 
probability of finding at least one case in the sample is 5%............... 185 

 
16 
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations 
ACAP – Amphibian Conservation Action Plan 
AET – Actual Evapotranspiration 
a.s.l. – Above Sea Level 
Bd
 – 
Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis 
CR – Critically Endangered 
DD – Data Deficient 
DNA – Dexoyribonucleic acid 
DT – Decision Tree 
EN – Endangered 
EPH – Endemic Pathogen Hypothesis 
ETI – External Threat Index 
GAA – Global Amphibian Assessment 
GEE – Generalised Estimating Equations 
GE – Genomic Equivalent 
GIS – Geographic Information System 
HPD – Human Population Density 
IPC – Internal Positive Control 
IUCN – Internationl Union for Conservation of Nature 
MAM – Minimum Adequate Model 
MSE – Mean Squared Error 
MU – Management Units 
NGO – Non-governmental Organisation 
NPH – Novel Pathogen Hypothesis 
NPP – Net Primary Productivity 
NT – Near Threatened 
PCM – Phylogenetic Comparative Methods 
PTES – People’s Trust for Endangered Species 
qPCR – Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction 
RD – Rapid Decline 

 
17 
TIPS – Non-phylogenetic Regression analysis using species as independent 
datapoints 
UVB – Ultraviolet B 
VU – Vulnerable 
 
 
 
 
 
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə