Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

 
 
Biological and Socio-Economical Baseline Report  
for the Establishment of the  
Greater Delaikoro Protected Area, Vanua Levu, 
 Fiji Islands 
 
2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and 
Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FPAM-2014-BIODIVERSITY-01
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication 
do  not  imply  the  expression  of  any  opinion  on  the  part  of  the  Food  and 
Agricultural  Organization  of  the  United  Nations  concerning  the  legal  and 
development status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or 
concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. 
 
The FPAM Project encourages the use of this report for study, research, news 
reporting, criticism or review. Selected passages, tables or diagrams may be 
reproduced  for  such  purposes  provided  acknowledgement  of  the  source  is 
included.  Major  extracts  or  the  entire  document  may  not  be  reproduced  by 
any process without written permission. 
 
Photo  title  page:  Greater  Delaikoro  Area,  Vanua  Levu,  Fiji  Islands,  courtesy 
Mr. Noa Moko 
 
 
 
FPAM contract: SAP/LoA/07/13 
 
 
 
For bibliographic purposes, please reference this publication as: 
 
FPAM  (2014)  Biological  and  Socio-Economical  Baseline  Report  for  the 
Establishment  of  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Protected  Area,  Vanua  Levu,  Fiji 
Islands.  A  Rapid  Biodiversity  Assessment,  Socioeconomic  Study  and 
Archaeological  Survey  of  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area,  June  2014,  Suva,  Fiji, 
FPAM-2014-BIODIVERSITY-01 

 
 
 
A biodiversity assessment, 
socioeconomic study and 
archaeological survey of the Greater 
Delaikoro Area, Vanua Levu. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Editors: Sarah Pene and Marika Tuiwawa 
 
A report compiled by the Institute of Applied Science, 
University of the South Pacific for FAO/GEF-PAS Forest and 
Protected Area Management, FPAM, Project  
 
June 2014, Suva, Fiji Islands 

 
 
 
Table of contents 
E
XECUTIVE 
S
UMMARY
 ..................................................................................................................... 1
 
I
NTRODUCTION
 ................................................................................................................................ 5
 
1
 
F
LORA AND 
V
EGETATION 
E
COLOGY
 ........................................................................................ 8
 
2
 
T
ERRESTRIAL 
I
NSECTS
 ........................................................................................................... 20
 
3
 
A
VIFAUNA
 ............................................................................................................................. 30
 
4
 
H
ERPETOFAUNA
 ..................................................................................................................... 37
 
5
 
F
RESHWATER 
F
ISHES
 ............................................................................................................. 46
 
6
 
F
RESHWATER 
M
ACROINVERTEBRATES
 .................................................................................. 53
 
7
 
I
NVASIVE 
S
PECIES
 .................................................................................................................. 73
 
8
 
A
RCHAEOLOGICAL 
S
URVEY
 ................................................................................................... 80
 
9
 
S
OCIOECONOMIC 
B
ASELINE 
S
TUDY
 ....................................................................................... 97
 
10
 
T
RAINING 
P
ROGRAM
 ............................................................................................................ 120
 
R
ECOMMENDATIONS
 .................................................................................................................... 125
 
R
EFERENCES
 ................................................................................................................................ 128
 
 
List of Appendices 
Appendix 1
 
Flora species checklist ........................................................................................ 134
 
Appendix 2
 
Checklist of mosses and liverworts..................................................................... 161
 
Appendix 3
 
Summary statistics of vegetation community structure assessment ................... 165
 
Appendix 4
 
Checklist of insects recorded within the Great Delaikoro Area ......................... 170
 
Appendix 5
 
Location of terrestrial insect sampling sites........................................................ 173
 
Appendix 6
 
Avifauna species checklist, status, distribution and abundance ......................... 176
 
Appendix 7
 
Location of point count stations, habitat and birds recorded .............................. 178
 
Appendix 8
 
Focal avifauna species recorded from the Greater Delaikoro Area .................... 180
 
Appendix 9
 
Herpetofauna suvey sites locations and sampling methods ................................ 181
 
Appendix 10
 
Herpetofauna species checklist for Vanua Levu and Delaikoro ..................... 182
 
Appendix 11
 
Water quality at freshwater fish sampling sites .............................................. 184
 
Appendix 12
 
Habitat characteristics at macroinvertebrate survey sites ............................... 185
 
Appendix 13
 
Water quality at freshwater macroinvertebrate sampling stations .................. 188
 
Appendix 14
 
Freshwater macroinvertebrate abundance categories per sampling station .... 189
 
Appendix 15
 
Freshwater macroinvertebrates abundance (Surber sampling) ....................... 192
 
Appendix 16
 
Freshwater macroinvertebrate abundance (kick-net and hand-picking) ......... 194
 
Appendix 17
 
Freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa of interest ................................................ 197
 
Appendix 18
 
List of invasive plant species documented ...................................................... 198
 
Appendix 19
 
List of invasive animal species documented ................................................... 199
 
Appendix 20
 
Household survey questionnaire ..................................................................... 200
 
Appendix 21
 
Focus group discussion and key informant interview questions .................... 208
 
 

 
 
 


 
Executive Summary 
This report is a  compilation of the findings of a biodiversity, socio-economic 
and archaeological survey carried out in a proposed protected area in Vanua 
Levu,  Fiji.  The  area  under  consideration  for  protection  is  the  Greater 
Delaikoro  Area,  an  upland  region  spanning  the  main  mountain  range  of 
Vanua  Levu,  encompassing  Mt  Delaikoro,  Mt  Sorolevu  and  the  Waisali 
Reserve.  This  work  was  carried  out  under  the  Forestry  and  Protected  Area 
Management Project, a component of the GEF-PAS program. 
Flora and vegetation ecology 
A  total  of  641  vascular  plant  taxa  and  117  bryophyte  taxa  were  recorded. 
Range  extensions  were  documented  for  all  the  bryophytes  and  90 species  of 
the  vascular  plants.  Ten  taxa  were  recorded  that  have  botanical  significant 
due  to  their  rarity  or  protection  status.  A  notable  find  was  a  rare  moss, 
Bescherelli  cryphaeiodes,  in  the  cloud  forest  of  Mt  Delaikoro,  hitherto  known 
only  from  a  single  location  in  Viti  Levu.  Lowland  and  dry  forest  areas  and 
associated riparian vegetation were the most heavily impacted by agricultural 
activity  and  invasive  species.  In  the  upland  and  cloud  forest  areas,  despite 
some  evidence  of  recent  and  historical  logging,  tree  species  diversity  and 
density were higher than in the lowland forests. 
Terrestrial Insects 
A total of eighteen families of beetles (Coleoptera) were recorded within the 
study  area,  as  well  as  a  high  abundance  of  ants  (Formicidae),  and  a  diverse 
macro-moth  fauna.  These  taxa  provide  critical  ecosystem  services  in  forest 
systems  such  as  soil  processing,  decomposition,  herbivory,  pollination  and 
seed dispersal. Insects of conservation value recorded during the survey were 
Hypolimnas  inopinata,  Cotylosoma  dipneusticum,  Phasmatonea  inermis,  Hypena 
rubrescens and Luxiaria sesquilinea. 
 
 


 
Avifauna 
A  total  of  27  species  of  land  birds  and  three  species  of  bats  were  recorded 
from 46 point count stations located in different sub-habitat types within both 
lowland,  upland  and  cloud  forest.  All  of  the  27  bird  species  recorded  were 
native, 24 of them endemic to Fiji. 
Herpetofauna 
Eight species of herpetofauna were recorded during the survey, of which four 
were endemic to Fiji, three others native and one was an invasive introduced 
species.  The  Vanua  Levu  endemic  skink,  Emoia  mokosariniveikau,  was  not 
encountered.  Further  surveys  will  very  likely  reveal  the  existence  of 
additional herpetofaunal species. 
Freshwater Fishes 
A  total  of  eighteen  species  of  fish  from  six  families  were  recorded  in  the 
tributaries of the Delaikoro range. A notable find was the goby Lentipes kaaea, 
this  being  the  first  record  of  it  on  the  island  of  Vanua  Levu.  Two  gobies 
endemic to Vanua Levu, Redigobius leveri and Redigobius lekutu, and two as yet 
undescribed  gobies  from  the  genus  Stiphodon  were  also  documented.  Water 
quality  was  well  within  habitable  range  in  terms  of  dissolved  oxygen, 
conductivity,  temperature  and  turbidity  across  all  sampling  stations.  The 
introduced  tilapia  (Oreochromis  spp.)  was  recorded  in  mid  and  lower  reach 
sites and may account for the low abundance and diversity of native stream 
fishes. 
Freshwater macroinvertebrates 
A  total  of  70  freshwater  macroinvertebrate  taxa  were  identified  from  the 
11,395  specimens  collected.  Of  these  70  taxa,  a  total  of  37  were  endemic  or 
native  to  Fiji.  A  total  of  twelve  macroinvertebrate  taxa  were  selected  as 
potential  bioindicators.  The  high  number  of  endemic  and  native  taxa 
recorded,  as  well  as  the  high  abundance  of  a  large  number  of  species  is 


 
indicative of a healthy stream system. A major finding during the survey was 
a new record of prawn species for FijiMacrobrachium spinosum. 
Invasives 
There  were  21  invasive  plant  species  and  thirteen  invasive  animal  species 
recorded throughout  the  survey  area.  Invasive  plants  were  readily  observed 
in  all  areas  surveyed,  most  abundantly  in  disturbed  habitats  such  as  roads, 
tracks,  waterways,  agricultural  areas  and  near  human  habitation.  The 
invasive  animals  recorded  included  birds,  mammals  and  amphibians.  The 
mammalian invasives were generally domesticated animals, such as pigs, cats 
and  dogs  which  have  become  feral,  as  well  as  several  species  of  invasive 
rodents. 
Archaeology 
The Greater Delaikoro Area is rich in historical and cultural material remains 
many  of  which  were  documented  for  the  first  time  as  part  of  this  survey. 
Eleven  sites  were  documented  including  house  mounds,  burial  grounds 
(including skeletal remains), and fortification ditches.   
Socioeconomic Survey 
A  socioeconomic  assessment  of  eight  villages  was  carried  out  using 
household surveys, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. It 
was  evident  from  this  survey  that  the  forests  of  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area 
play  a  major  role  in  the  attainment  of  sustainable  livelihoods  in  these 
communities. The average household monthly income is $719, with the main 
income sources being reported as the sale of yaqona. Subsistence agriculture 
was also important to these communities, with 91% of households stated that 
they eat food grown by household members every day. The forested areas are 
also  a  major  food  source  for  communities,  in  terms  of  hunting,  fishing  and 
gathering  of  wild  foods.  The  survey  also  reported  community  views  on 


 
resource utilisation and management, with 85% of respondents in support of 
creating a protected area. 
Recommendations 
Overall the  survey  findings  support  a  recommendation  for  protection  of  the 
area. Ongoing community awareness programs are recommended to discuss 
the  value  of  and  the  mechanisms  for  protecting  the  area.  Demarcating  and 
managing the protected area should take into account ecological connectivity 
of habitats and the threats posed by agriculture and invasive species. Further 
flora and fauna survey work is required for a more comprehensive report on 
the  biodiversity  of  the  area,  and  a  community  needs  assessment  and  oral 
history documentation are also recommended. 
 
 


 
Introduction 
The  Pacific  Alliance  for  Sustainability  (PAS)  is  a  program  of  the  Global 
Environment  Facility  (GEF).  The  overall  objective  of  the  GEF-PAS  is  to 
increase  the  efficiency  and  effectiveness  of  GEF  support  to  Pacific  Island 
countries,  thereby  enhancing  achievement  of  both  global  environmental  and 
national sustainable development goals. 
One  of  the  projects  funded  by  GEF-PAS  is  the  Forestry  and  Protected  Area 
Management Project, which is being implemented in Fiji, Niue, Vanuatu and 
Samoa.  This  project  aims  to  enhance  the  sustainable  livelihoods  of  local 
communities  living  in  and  around  protected  areas,  as  well  as  strengthen 
biodiversity conservation and reduce forest and land degradation. 
 In Fiji, one of the forest areas being considered for protection is the Greater 
Delaikoro  Area,  an  upland  region  spanning  the  main  mountain  range  of 
Vanua  Levu,  encompassing  Mt  Delaikoro,  Mt  Sorolevu  and  the  Waisali  
Forest Reserve. 
In September-October 2013 a team from the South Pacific Regional Herbarium 
at  the  Institute  of  Applied  Sciences  (IAS)  and  from  the  Forestry  Department 
carried  out  surveys  in  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  to  produce  a  baseline 
assessment  of  the  biodiversity.  This  biodiversity  survey  comprised  the 
following  taxonomic  groups:  plants,  insects,  avifauna,  freshwater  fishes  and 
macroinvertebrates  and  herpetofauna.  Invasive  flora  and  fauna  were  also 
documented.  
As part of this baseline survey, parataxonomic training was also carried out to 
build  capacity  amongst  community  members  who  were  recruited  as  field 
guides and assistants. Technical personnel from the Forestry Department and 
research  students  from  USP  were  also  given  training  to  upscale  their 
taxonomic skills.  


 
Additionally, a team from the Environment Unit of IAS carried out a study of 
the  socioeconomic  status  of  communities  living  in  and  around  the proposed 
protected  area.  Cultural  landmarks  located  within  the  forest  were 
documented by an archaeological team from the Fiji Museum. This report is a 
compilation  of  the  findings  of  the  biodiversity,  socio-economic  and 
archaeology surveys. 


 
 
Figure 1: Location of the proposed protected Greater Delaikoro Area in Vanua Levu 


 
1
 
Flora and Vegetation Ecology 
Marika  Tuiwawa,  Art  Whistler,  Senilolia  H.  Tuiwawa,  Mereia  Katafono  and 
Hans Wendt 
1.1
 
Introduction 
This  report  documents  the  results  of  a  survey  of  vascular  and  non-vascular 
plants of the Greater Delaikoro Area. The objectives of this survey were: 

 
to document the range of vegetation types and botanical communities 
within the study area

 
to identify the presence (or potential presence) of species or ecosystems 
of national or international significance, 

 
to  assess  the  susceptibility  of  plant  communities  to  the  potential 
impacts  associated  with  human  activities,  such  as  agriculture,  hydro-
electricity and habitation development. 
1.2
 
Methods 
1.2.1
 
Reconnaissance 
Prior to the fieldwork an initial assessment of the study area was made using 
satellite  imagery  and  1:50,000  topographic  maps.  It  was  noted  that  forested 
areas near villages closest to the area of interest (Mt. Sorolevu, Mt. Delaikoro 
and  the  ridge  running  from  Waisali  to  Mt.  Delaikoro)  were  degraded 
secondary  forest.  Areas  closer  to  the  mountain  tops  appeared  to  have  more 
intact forest vegetation types, such as montane or cloud forest. 
A five-day reconnaissance trip was carried out in August 2013 to finalise key 
biodiversity  areas  in  central  Vanua  Levu  that  would  form  the  basis  for  the 
proposed  protected  area.  Local  stakeholders  were  formally  approached  to 
solicit their support for the survey and eventual  protection of the area. Some 
of  the  villages  included  during  the  consultation  were  Doguru,  Suweni, 
Navakuru, Waisali and Biaugunu. 


 
 
Figure 2: The distribution of principal vegetation types within the project area, and the four main sites for the flora survey: Waisali (W),  Mt Delaikoro 
(D), Mt Sorolevu (SR) and Savusa (S). 

10 
 
1.2.2
 
Floral diversity 
The biodiversity assessment was carried out in September 2013. The survey involved 
the  documentation  of  vascular  and  non-vascular  plants,  with  an  emphasis  on  the 
presence of rare and threatened endemic species.  All the plant species encountered 
within  the  belt  transects  set  up  to  quantitatively  assess  plant  density,  distribution 
and  diversity  within  the  forest  types  were  documented,  as  well  as  those  observed 
whilst trekking through the study area.The four main sites for the flora survey were 
Mt Delaikoro, Mt Sorolevu, Waisali and Savusa. 
Specimens  were  deposited  at  the  South  Pacific  Regional  Herbarium  (SPRH). 
Verification of specimen identification was  carried out with reference to  herbarium 
vouchers and published floras and checklists, notably Smith (1979; 1981; 1985; 1988; 
1991) for the spermatophytes, and Brownlie  (1977) and Brownsey and Perrie  (2011) 
for the pteridophytes. 
1.2.3
 
Vegetation ecology 
Habitat characterisation 
Habitat  characterisation  for  forested  areas  relied  on  a  number  of  sources  of 
information: 

 
plot data to determine vegetation community structure 

 
principal vegetation types (Mueller-Dombois and Fosberg, 1998) 

 
1:50,000 topographic map indicating terrain features 
The  non-forested  areas  included  open  country  (rivers,  open  riparian  areas,  roads, 
villages and settlements) and agricultural land (subsistence plantations, commercial 
farms,  pastures  and  fallow  land).  These  non-forested  areas  were  not  assessed  in 
detail but were briefly described and highlighted in the vegetation map (Figure  2). 
The  assessment  of  the  vegetation  was  focused  more  on  forested  area  then  on  non-
forested areas. 

11 
 
For  the  habitat-typing  process  the  most  prominent  topographical  feature  of  the 
forested area was used: 

 
Slope  -  forested  area  found  on  slopes  with  a  gradient  ranging  from  10  to  85 
degrees. 

 
Ridge top - forested area found on top of or along a ridge or mountain range. 
The width of such ridges could range from a few centimetres up to 20 m. 

 
Flat - forested areas with a gradient ranging from 0 to 10 degrees. These areas 
also included raised river flats and flood plains. 
Vegetation community structure  
Quantitative assessment of the communities in different forest types was  carried out 
using 10 m x 10 m plots along a 100 m transect, a methodology used previously in 
other sites in Fiji (Mueller-Dombois and Fosberg, 1998; Tuiwawa, 1999). 
Plots were used to: 

 
assess the presence and absence of focal species, 

 
characterise  associated  vegetation  communities  with  each  principal 
vegetation type, 

 
confirm boundaries between biological communities encountered. 
Within each plot, every tree with a diameter at breast height (dbh) greater or equal to 
5 cm  was  measured,  identified  and  recorded.  The  bole  height,  crown  height  and 
crown width were estimated for each tree enumerated. Ground cover vegetation was 
described, canopy cover estimated and the epiphytic flora recorded. 
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə