Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə10/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   17

Table 12: Responses to value statements 
Statement 
Percentage of respondents 
Totally 
agree 
Agree 
Neutral 
Disagree 
Totally 
disagree 
It is not important to protect/conserve forest biodiversity  0% 
5% 
4% 
6% 
85% 
Money is more important during logging than ensuring 
sustainable practices 
5% 
10% 
6% 
12% 
67% 
If a portion of mataqali land is reserved, my household 
livelihood will be badly affected 
0% 
4% 
3% 
6% 
87% 
Social cohesion in the village is strong 
65% 
10% 
5% 
15% 
5% 
Women and youths are part of decision making in the 
village 
68% 
12% 
5% 
5% 
10% 
The  respondents  were  then  asked  what  they  thought  about  the  creation  of  a 
protected  area  of  some  sort  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area.  Most  respondents 
stated that creating a protected area would be a good idea, with 85% supporting it. 
Only 8% thought it was a bad idea while the remaining 7% mentioned it was up to 
the mataqali chiefs to decide, a response that reflects upon the Fijian social structure 
and  system  of  revering  those  in  authority.  When  asked  why  they  favored  the 
creation of a protected area, the following reasons were given: 

118 
 

 
Conserve natural resources

 
Conserve of the environment for future generation, 

 
Develop tourism opportunities such as the Waisali Forest Reserve

 
Protect water-head sources, 

 
Create employment. 
Reasons  not  to  create  the  protected  area  included  the  loss  of  crops  and  restricted 
access to forest resources, as well as the loss of hunting areas, and therefore less bush 
meat 
9.4
 
Recommendations 
The  survey  also  gave  participants  an  opportunity  to  make  recommendations  from 
their own perspective. The survey team used these and their general understanding 
of  the  proposed  project  to  advance  a  number  of  next  steps  in  an  effort  to  advise 
relevant stakeholders. 
Intensify awareness raising programs: to influence a positive shift in attitudes and 
practices educational programs are needed to raise awareness on the ecological roles 
and importance of the Greater Delaikoro Area to community livelihoods. 
Develop  and  implement  community  natural  resource  management  plans:  the 
survey  found  out  that  there  are  some  resource  management  strategies  and 
agreements already in place in some of the study sites. Scaling-up this effort to cover 
all  communities  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  is  important  to  ensure  the 
sustainability of this important region. 
Formulate by-laws: to complement community natural resource management plan, 
by-laws need to be formulated and enacted to give legal power for compliance and 
enforcement. 
Demarcate  boundaries  and  create  buffer  zones:  with  the  support  of  the  relevant 
stakeholders, efforts should be made to demarcate areas of biological importance in 
the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  from  community  and  mataqali  land.  Once  these 

119 
 
boundaries have been demarcated, then buffers zones can be put in place as a way to 
reinforce the ‘respect’ for those boundaries. 
Conduct  a  needs  assessment:  the  current  level  of  reliance  on  agriculture  for 
community livelihoods is too overwhelming and in most areas the footprint can be 
seen.  The  high  demand  for  agricultural  resources  coupled  with  the  increase  in 
population in communities is a risk to the area’s ecosystem carrying capacity which 
could  lead  to  resource  degradation,  reduced  production,  poor  community  health 
and  aggravated  poverty.  Therefore,  an  assessment  of  community  needs  should  be 
undertaken  to  determine  how  such  needs  can  be  addressed  without  further 
degrading natural resources. 
Factor  in  rural  livelihood  and  poverty:  there  is  a  need  to  promote  alternative 
sustainable  resource-based  and  non-resource-based  activities  to  reduce  rural 
poverty, while at the same time easing the pressure on resources. 
Information packaging: the survey revealed that formal education levels of most of 
the people  in the  study sites are generally low. Information needs to be tailored to 
suit  the  audience,  with  an  emphasis  on  direct  communication  methods  such  as 
attending village meetings, radio communication, and posters in the local languages. 
Protected  area  and  access:  It  is  clear  that  most  of  the  people  living  around  the 
Greater  Delaikoro  Area  would  be  willing  to  have  some  form  of  protected  area 
created for the forest and resources in the region. It is also clear that they would also 
want  to  have  some  form  of  access  to  forest products  which  we  have  shown  are  an 
important part of their livelihoods. The types of access that will be allowed will need 
to be discussed and agreed upon. For instance, will wild pig hunting be allowed to 
continue  –  will  it  be  allowed  throughout  the  forest  or  will  hunting  areas  be 
designated?  The  same  discussions  are  needed  for  other  products,  such  as  timber 
harvesting, wild ferns and others. 
 
 

120 
 
10
 
Training Program 
10.1
 
Background 
In all biological surveys a gasp of taxonomy, and the ability to not only recognise but 
identify  organisms  is  of  the  utmost  importance.  Without  this  understanding  and 
knowledge  the  study  or  survey  is  incomplete.  Unsurprisingly,  the  majority  of 
resource/landowners  know  very  little  of  what  they  have  in  their  remote  forests, 
beyond  the  plants  and  animals  that  are  consumed  or  used  in  day-to-day  living. 
Hence  the  opportunity  was  taken  to  include  them  in  the  surveys  so  as  to  provide 
some  basic  training  in  taxonomy  and  survey  methodology,  whilst  this  work  was 
carried out on their land. 
A  capacity  building  training  program  on  developing  and  improving  taxonomical 
expertise  for  resources  and  landowners  and  personnel  from  Fiji’s  departments  of 
Forestry and Fisheries was also implemented during this survey. More precisely the 
para-taxonomic training is for selected members of the landowning units and other 
community  members  (who  were  used  as  local  guides  and  porters)  in  the  area  of 
botany,  vegetation  ecology,  herpetology,  ornithology,  archeology,  freshwater 
ichthyology and entomology (terrestrial and freshwater). 
Each trainee was initially given the opportunity to choose whatever area of training 
they would like to undergo. The detailed description of the survey methodologies is 
outlined in the methodology sections of the relevant chapters of this report. For this 
section of the report a short summary of who the trainer and trainers wer,e and what 
sort of training was carried out is summarized.
 
10.2
 
Training methodology 
A  total  of  sixteen  people  received  training  during  the  survey  work.  The  trainees 
were  selected  based  on  their  active  involvement  in  the  utilization  of  their  natural 
resources  as  a  means  for  economic  development  and/or  for  livelihood.  Six  of  the 

121 
 
trainees  were  personnel  from  Forestry  Department,  one  was  from  the  Fisheries 
Department and the remaining nine were resource owners and landowners from the 
local communities.   
The  table  below  lists  the  persons  who  were trained,  the  village  or institutions  they 
represented and has a brief summary of the type of training or upskilling that they 
received. 
Table 13 List of trainees for the Greater Mt Delaikoro proposed protected area survey 
Trainee
 
Village 
/Institution
 
Tikina/province
 
Designation
 
Notes
 
Vilimoni
 
Bagata 
village
 
Wailevu, 
Cakaudrove
 
Villager
 
Botanical and vegetation surveys. 
Common 
tree 
species 
identification. Habitat types.
 
Panapasa
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Colo-i-Suva 
– 
Forestry
 
Research officer
 
Plots  &  transect  layout,  tree 
identification 
and 
plot 
measurements. 
Specimen 
collection
 
Jale
 
Kenani 
settlement
 
Dogotuki, 
Macuata
 
Villager
 
PSP  survey  methods  –  tree 
measurements, 
tree 
identification, 
carbon 
measurements
 
Netani 
 
Sarafini 
settlement
 
Dogotuki, 
Macuata
 
Villager
 
PSP  survey  methods  –  tree 
measurements, 
tree 
identification, 
carbon 
measurements
 
Ra Jale
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Coloisuva 
 
-
Forestry
 
GIS personnel
 
Forest stratification
 
Ropate
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Labasa
 
Community 
leader
 
Forest  ecology,  status  of  forest 
due to impacts, indicator species, 
invasive alien species presence
 
Senivalati 
Vido
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Colo  I  Suva  -  
Forestry
 
Forest 
Park 
Ranger
 
Ornithology-  bird  identification 
and  survey  techniques,  catching 
and  handling  birds  using  Mist 
nets  and  botany  (plots  and  tree 
identification)
 
Waisea
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Colo-i-Suva 
– 
Forestry
 
Forest 
Park 
Ranger
 
Ornithology  –  bird  identification 
and  survey  techniques,  catching 
and  handling  birds  using  Mist 
nets
 
Veresa
 
Biaugunu 
village
 
 Koroalau, 
Cakaudrove
 
Villager
 
Bird  survey  techniques  and 
botanical survey. Identification of 
common tree species
 
Jone
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Sueni, 
Cakaudrove
 
Villager
 
Herpetofauna  surveys  –  survey 
techniques 
of 
reptiles 
and 
amphibians. 
Identification 
of 
common reptiles and amphibians
 

122 
 
Sala
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Colo-i-Suva 
 

Forestry
 
Research officer
 
Entomology survey – light traps, 
 
Iowane
 
Dogoru 
village
 
Wailevu, Macuata
 
Villager
 
Entomology  survey  techniques. 
General  groups  (taxonomy)  of 
insects. Collection methods.
 
Vilisoni
 
Fiji  Fisheries 
Dept
 
Nausori
 
Fisheries officer
 
Freshwater 
fish 
survey 
techniques 
and 
methods. 
Identification 
of 
common 
freshwater fish
 
Joeli
 
Navakuru 
village
 
Cakaudrove
 
Villager
 
Archaeological  survey  methods. 
Identification  features  of  sites  in 
the field
 
Sikeli
 
Naikawaga 
village
 
Koroalau, 
Cakaudrove
 
Villager
 
Archaeological  survey  methods. 
Identification  features  of  sites  in 
the field 
 
Vili 
Tupua
 
Fiji  Forestry 
Dept
 
Colo-i-Suva
 
Forest Guard
 
Socio-economic 
survey 
techniques in local communities.
 
10.2.1
 
Para taxonomy in Botany and Ecology 
Trainers: Marika Tuiwawa -botanist and ecologist; Sarah Pene – Invasive species. 
The group did opportunistic collections of higher vascular plants that were fruiting 
and or had flowers. Botanical naming systems were explained and discussions held 
to  document  and  record  the  common  names  generally  used  in  Fiji,  as  well  as  the 
local Macuata dialect.. For the ecological component the group and the trainees used 
plots  (10 m  x  10  m)  to  quantitatively  assess  tree  biomass  in  selected  forest  types. 
Some trainees also assisted in processing specimens as herbarium voucher materials. 
During  this  activity  finer  taxonomic  details  were  discussed,  which  included  leaf, 
fruit  and  flower  morphology  characterisations,  as  well  as  discussion  on  growth, 
habit form and distribution. When other landowners were present discussions on the 
uses (including traditional uses) of certain plant species were also held. 
10.2.2
 
Entomology Training 
Trainers: Hilda Waqa, Bindya Raksha and Apaitia Liga - entomologists 
The group and the trainees targeted a diversity of habitats (slopes, flats, ridges and 
riparian areas) and vegetation types (lowland and upland  systems within primary, 
secondary  and  native  forests)  to  carry  out  the  survey.  The  trainees  learned  how  to 
use  a  variety  of  collection  techniques  that  included  active  surveys  (UV  light  traps, 

123 
 
leaf  litter  sampling,  winkler  bags  sticky  tapes)  as  well  as  opportunistic  surveys 
(using  hand  held  nets  and  a  Surber  sampler).  For  the  opportunistic  surveys  the 
trainees learned how to capture wild butterflies, damsel flies, mayflies, stick insects, 
cicadas,  beetles  and  freshwater  invertebrates  and  for  some  of  the  larger  insects 
caught they were taught the local and common names. Later at the base camp some 
basic preservation techniques were carried out with the trainees. Discussions on the 
conservation significance of some of these species were also carried out between the 
trainee and trainer.  
10.2.3
 
Avifauna and Mammal Parataxonomy Training 
Trainer: Alivereti Naikatini – Bird and mammal specialist 
The  trainee  joined  the  avifauna  group  to  survey  birds  and  bats  encountered  along 
tracks,  areas  accessible  by  dirt  roads  and  locally  known  bat  roosts.  The  survey 
methods  used  included  the  point  count  method  (for  both  bats  and  birds),  mist 
netting  in  open  high  areas  for  bats  at  night  and  birds  in  the  early  mornings,  bat 
detector surveys in the evenings, opportunistic surveys through observations using 
binoculars  and  recognizing  bird  calls  and  from  interviews  with  local  community 
members. 
More than 45 bird and three bat species were documented during the survey. Both 
the local and generic common names were given for the birds and for the later the 
trainees played a key role in providing these names (usually  after consulting other 
guides).  For  this  group  the  trainee  presented  a  brief  summary  of  their  findings 
during a debriefing workshop at the end of the survey. 
10.2.4
 
Herpetofauna Training 
Trainer: Nunia Thomas - herpetologist  
The  trainee  joined  the  herpetofauna  group  to  assist  with  diurnal  and  nocturnal 
herpetofauna  surveys,  opportunistic  visual  encounter  surveys,  standardized  sticky 
trap  transects  and  standardized  (time  constrained)  nocturnal  visual  encounter 

124 
 
surveys.  For  all  herpetofauna  collected  from  these  surveys  the  trainee  was 
familiarized  with  the  most  distinguishable  feature  typical  of  each  species  to  enable 
him  to  correctly  distinguish  different  species  fror  each  other.  The  trainee  co-
presented  a  brief  summary  of  the  findings  of  the  herpetofauna  survey  during  a 
debriefing workshop at the end of the survey. 
10.2.5
 
Freshwater Fish Training 
Trainers: Lekima Copeland and Kinikoto Mailautoka – Freshwater fish specialists 
The trainees were taught the use of equipment to collect physiochemical data from 
the  field.  They  were  also  involved  in  using  field  methods  that  were  designed  to 
enable  the  most  comprehensive  documentation  of  fishes  present  in  the  tributaries, 
including beach seine and snorkeling. Overall a total of eighteen species of fish from 
six families were directly observed or collected and local names were also discussed 
with trainees and documented. 
10.2.6
 
Archaeological Survey Training 
Trainers: Elia Nakoro and Sakiusa Kataiwai – Archeology specialist 
The trainees were elderly village guides and through dsicussions with them on oral 
histories  and  their  knowledge  of  the  area,  areas  of  interest  were  identified  and 
located.  Information  regarding  these  areas  was  also  discussed  and  verified  with 
other  elders  in  the  village  before  it  was  documented.  A  total  of  11  new  sites  were 
documented. 
10.2.7
 
Conclusion 
It is envisaged that the inclusion and exposure of trainees in the survey will not only 
broaden  their  recognition  and  knowledge  about  these  natural  resource,  but  would 
also  assist  in  the  dissemination  of  this  information  to  members  of  the  greater 
community that they come from.  
 
 

125 
 
Recommendations 
Recommendations  specific  to  the  individual  components  of  the  study  have  been 
included at the end of each section of this report. Below is an overview of the general 
recommendations that have been elicited as a result of this study. 
The  survey  has  shown  that  the  area  is  of  high  biodiversity  value  and  it  is 
recommended  that  it  be  accorded  a  protected  status,  however,  further  work  is 
required  to  fully  clarify  certain  species  identifications  and  to  more  thoroughly 
document species range extensions throughout the entire proposed protected area. 

 
the  surveys  of  all  the  major  taxonomic  groups  showed  that  the  areas  surveyed 
contained  high  species  diversity,  including  both  national  and  island  endemics, 
many of which either already have protection status, or would be deserving of 
such. 

 
some new finds and range extensions highlight the high possibility that the full 
scope of the biodiversity has not been fully described, and that further work will 
reveal an ever greater scope of biodiversity. 
Community awareness:  

 
It  is  recommended  that  a  community  awareness  program  ensure  that 
communities  are  appraised  of  the  significant  findings  of  the  surveys,  and 
highlights the ecological roles and importance of the Greater Delaikoro Area to 
community livelihoods. 

 
The  types  of  access  to  the  protected  area  that  will  be  allowed  to  communities 
will need to be discussed and agreed upon. 

 
The  medium  of  community  awareness-raising  needs  to  be  tailored  to  suit  the 
audience, with an emphasis on direct communication methods such as attending 
village meetings, radio communication, and posters in the local languages. 
Some  factors  to  take  into  consideration  when  considering  the  protection  of  the 
area: 

126 
 

 
Ecological  connectivity:  catchment  headwaters  must  be  a  protection  priority 
to ensure the health of habitats in downstream areas of the catchments. 

 
Agricultural  encroachment  poses  a  significant  threat  to  high-biodiversity 
areas,  in  particular  in  forested  areas  subjected  to  slash-and-burn  clearing,  or 
in  riparian  areas  that  lack  a  buffer  zone  between  the  waterway  and 
agricultural or pastoral land. 

 
Invasive  species  control  and/or  monitoring  should  be  a  component  of  any 
proposal  for  the  designation  and  long-term  management  of  a  proposed 
protected area. 

 
An evaluation of existing resource management strategies and agreements in 
place  in  some  parts  of  the  study  area  should  be  undertaken,  including  the 
potential  to  upscale  these  to  cover  all  communities  within  the  proposed 
protected area. 

 
Once the protected area boundary has been demarcated, buffer zones can be 
put in place as a way to reinforce ‘respect’ for that boundary. 
Further survey work required for a more comprehensive biodiversity assessment: 

 
Additional  survey  work  would  cover  a  greater  proportion  of  the  proposed 
protected  area,  and  thus  ensure  that  recommendations  for  the  boundary 
delimitations are based on a wider sampling range. 

 
More work is needed to confirm identifications of sampled species, and to ensure 
as comprehensive a species checklist as possible. Some species known to occur in 
the  area  were  not  sampled  due  to  their  seasonality,  weather  conditions  at  the 
time  of  the  survey,  or  the  highly  restricted  nature  of  their  range,  therefore 
additional  survey  time  is  necessary  to  get  a  current  confirmation  of  their 
presence.  Additional  survey  time  would  also  yield  more  confirmed 
identifications  with  additional  collections  of  flowering  and  fruiting  material  or 
different life stages of the organism. 

127 
 

 
The  current  survey  provided  a  snapshot  of  biodiversity  at  the  sampling  sites. 
However,  surveys  over  longer  time  periods  would  be  necessary  to  get  more 
comprehensive  data  on  species  population  size  and  density,  their  complete 
geographical  ranges  and  ecological  requirements.  It  is  this  information  that  is 
required  for  long-term  monitoring  of  the  ecological  health  of  a  protected  area, 
and the evaluation of the effectiveness of protection. 
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə