Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

1.3
 
Results and discussion 
1.3.1
 
Overall floral diversity 
A total of 758 taxa were recorded for the four sites surveyed, of which there were 641 
taxa  of  vascular  plants  (Appendix  1)  and  117  taxa
 
of  non-vascular  plants  or 
bryophytes  (Appendix  2).  The  vascular  plants  comprised  139  families,  390  genera 

12 
 
and  594  species.  101  taxa  could  not  be  determined  to  species  level.  The  dominant 
families  were  Rubiaceae  (58  species),  Orchidaceae  (43  species)  and  Euphorbiaceae 
(28  species)  whilst  the  most  species-rich  genera  were  Psychotria  (16  species)  in  the 
Rubiaceae  family,  Ficus  (12  species)  in  the  Moraceae  family  and  Syzygium  (11 
species)  in  the  Myrtaceae  family.  In  total,  there  were  539  angiosperms  (435  dicots 
and  104  monocots),  92  ferns  and  fern  allies  and  ten  gymnosperm  taxa.  Altogether 
539 native species were recorded during the survey, of which 224 are endemic to Fiji. 
A  total  of  94  introduced  species  or  exotics  were  recorded,  of  which  eight  were 
recognized invasive species. 
The preliminary checklist of the bryophytes comprised 68 mosses and 49 liverworts 
identified  to  the  family  and  genus  level.  The  largest  families  of  mosses  were 
Calymperaceae (14 species), Dicranaceae (12 species) and Hypnaceae (7 species). The 
largest  liverwort  families  were  Lejeuneaceae  (24  species)  and  Lepidoziaceae  (6 
species). A notable find was the rare moss, Bescherelli cryphaeiodes, in the cloud forest 
of Mt Delaikoro, previously known only from Mt Voma in Namosi, Viti Levu. 
1.3.2
 
New flora records 
There were 207 taxa listed as new records of the areas surveyed. These comprised 90 
species of vascular plants whose documented distributions did not include the four 
sites  surveyed,  as  well  as  the  68  species  of  moss  and  49  species  of  liverworts 
collected.  Bryophyte  work  is  in  its  infancy  in  Fiji,  hence  the  high  number  of  new 
records yielded by this initial collection (Konrat pers. comm.). 
1.3.3
 
Focal species 
There  were  a  total  of  ten  taxa  considered  important  due  to  their  rarity,  botanical 
significance  and  current  distribution.  Many  of  these  appear  on  the  IUCN  Red  List 
and  are  protected  under  the  Convention  on  International  Trade  in  Endangered 
Species  of  Wild  Flora  and  Fauna  (CITES)  and  Fiji’s  Endangered  and  Protected 
Species (EPS) Act. 

13 
 
1.
 
Agathis  macrophylla  (Lindl.)  Mast.—was  recorded  in  most  of  the  study  area  at 
400–500 m.  This  indigenous  tree  podocarp  found  in  the  lowland  and  upland 
areas  surveyed  is  currently  listed  as  endangered  on  the  IUCN  Red  list  (Farjon, 
2013). It is locally known as dakua makadre and is under threat from logging. 
2.
 
Balaka  macrocarpa  Burret—an  endemic  palm  in  the  family  Arecaceae,  sighted  in 
the vicinity of Mt. Sorolevu and Savusa area between 200–500 m. It is classified 
on  the  IUCN  Red  List  as  critically  endangered  (Fuller,  1998)  and  is  protected 
under  the  EPS.  It  is  locally  referred to  as  niuniu  and  is  a  relatively  uncommon 
species. 
3.
 
Astronidium  inflatum  (A.C.Sm.)  A.  C.  Sm—an  endemic  trees  species  in  the 
Melastomaceae family. It is classified as critically endangered on the IUCN Red 
List (World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 1998a) and is protected under the 
Fiji Endangered and Protected Species (EPS) Act. .  
4.
 
Cynometra  falcata  A.  Gray—an  endemic  species  in  the  Leguminosae  family. 
Saplings  were  observed  mostly  in  the  understory  of  the  lowland  rainforest  on 
Mt. Sorolevu. It is classified as being critically endangered on the IUCN Red List 
(World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 1998b). Logging activities pose a major 
threat to its occurrence. 
5.
 
Spiraeanthemum  graeffei  Seem.—an  endemic  tree  species  in  the  Cunnoniaceae 
family.  It  is  listed  as  an  endangered  species  on  the  IUCN  Red  List  (World 
Conservation  Monitoring  Centre,  1998c)  and  is  protected  under  the  EPS.  Its 
biggest threat is from logging. 
6.
 
Storckiella  vitiensis  Seem.—an  endemic  species  in  the  Leguminosae  family.  It  is 
categorised  as  a  vulnerable  species  on  the  IUCN  Red  list  (World  Conservation 
Monitoring Centre, 1998d) and is protected under the Fiji  EPS Act. Major threats 
are unsustainable logging activities.  
7.
 
Weinmannia  exigua  A.C.Sm.—an  endemic  tree  species  in  the  Cunnoniaceae 
family.  It  is  listed  as  critically  endangered  on  the  IUCN  Red  List  (World 

14 
 
Conservation  Monitoring  Centre,  1998e)  and  has  protection  under  the  EPS. 
Logging activities pose a major threat to its occurrence. 
8.
 
Weinmannia vitiensis Seem.—an endemic tree species in the Cunnoniaceae family. 
It  is  listed  as  a  vulnerable  species  on  the  IUCN  Red  list  (World  Conservation 
Monitoring  Centre,  1998f)  and  is  protected  under  the  Fiji    EPS  Act.  Logging 
activities pose a major threat to its occurrence.  
9.
 
Metroxylon  vitiense  (H.Wendl.)  H.Wendl.ex  Hook.f.—very  few  trees  were 
observed along the river embankments in the lower Waivuvu  River catchment. 
The palm is endemic to Fiji and is locally common on south east Viti Levu and 
Vanua Levu. The palm is locally referred to as  soga.  Unfortunately the palm is 
highly  threatened  both  for  the  use  of  the  palm  heart  for  food  and  leaves  for 
thatching  in  the  tourism  industry.  Its  habitat  (swamp)  is  targeted  for  land 
reclamation both for agricultural development and human habitation. 
10.
 
Bescherelli cryphaeiodes (Mull.Hal.) M. Fleisch.—an uncommon moss collected on 
tree branches near the road in the cloud forest of Mt. Delaikoro at about 1110 m. 
The  only  other  known  collection  has  been  from  Mt.  Voma  (Namosi  Province, 
Viti Levu) at 700 m in 2007-2008. 
1.3.4
 
Vegetation ecology 
Of the nine principal vegetation types recorded for Fiji, five were encountered in the 
study  area:  lowland  rainforest,  upland  rainforest,  cloud  forest,  dry  forest  and 
talasiga  grassland.  The  dry  forest  referred  to  here  is  a  mesic  forest.  Representative 
areas  of  lowland  and  cloud  forest  vegetation  types  were  quantitatively  assessed, 
whilst the other vegetation types were qualitatively described. 
The  detailed  results  of  the  quantitative  assessment  of  plots  in  these  different 
vegetation  types  are  given  in  Appendix  3.  In  total,  50  plots  along  seven  transects 
were  analysed,  36  in  lowland  forest  and  fourteen  in  cloud  forest.  Within  each  of 
these  vegetation  types  the  plots  were  distributed  over  a  variety  of  forest  habitats 
based on the most prominent physical features i.e. ridge flat, slope or riparian flat. 

15 
 
1.3.5
 
Lowland rainforest  
Lowland  rainforest  in  Fiji  is  typically  found  on  the  windward  side  of  the  large 
islands,  from  sea  level  to  650  m,  with  an  annual  rainfall  of  over  2000  mm.  In  the 
proposed Greater Delaikoro Area the lowland rainforest is found at elevations of 300 
m and above, including the upper catchments of the Labasa, Tabia, Qawa, Dreketi, 
Koroalau,  Nasekau  and  Qaloyago  rivers.  Overall,  the  forest  in  this  principal 
vegetation type is best described as primary forest. The majority of the tree species 
recorded  from  the  lowland  forest  plots  were  either  endemic  or  indigenous.  A  few 
were  species  associated  with  human  habitation,  and  some  of  these  were  also 
observed  outside  the  plots.  Stocking  of  good  quality  timber  tree  species  was  high 
and so was the size of merchantable tree species. 
Two  different  lowland  forest  types  were  observed  and  quantified  using  seventeen 
plots in three transects: 
Ridge-top forest type 
The nine plots used to assess this forest type contained an average of nineteen trees 
(range:  14–24)  and  an  average  of  thirteen  species  (range:  10–16)  per  plot.  The  most 
common  species  was  Myristica  spp.  (kaudamu),  which  was  present  in  50%  of  the 
plots  assessed.  The  largest  trees  measured  were  Degeneria  vitiensis (vavaloa)  with  a 
dbh  of  82  cm,  followed  by  Myristica  spp.  with  a  dbh  of  81  cm  and  Endospermum 
macrophyllum (kauvula) with a dbh of 80 cm. The average tree dbh was 19 cm (range 
5–82 cm). Overall, the dominant species for this forest type was Syzygium spp. with 
38%  relative  dominance  which  together  with  Myristica  spp.  makes  up  two  thirds 
(66%) of the total tree biomass in the plots. 
Slope forest type 
A  total  of  26  plots  along  four  transects  were  assessed  in  lowland  slope  forest  at 
Navakuro,  Nukubolu  and  Savusa.  At  Navakuro  the  most  common  tree  species 
recorded  were  Macaranga  spp.  (gadoa),  Cyathea  spp.  (balabala)  and  Gironniera 

16 
 
celtidifolia  (sisisi).  The  largest  trees  were  Alphitonia  spp.  (doi),  Dysoxylum  richii 
(tarawau  kei  rakaka)  and  Endospermum  macrophyllum  with  average  dbh  of  11  cm 
(range:  5–55  cm).  These  more  common  trees  are  usually  associated  with  secondary 
forest and the larger trees are fast growing trees. 
At  Nukubolu  and  Savusa,  the  21  plots  assessed  had  an  average  of  nineteen  trees 
(range: 7–29) per plot, and an average of eleven species (range: 5–17). Syzygium spp. 
(yasiyasi) and Gironniera celtidifolia occurred in more than 30% of the plots assessed, 
and were the most common species. The average dbh was 15 cm  (range: 5–73 cm). 
The largest trees documented in the plots were Calophyllum vitiense (damanu) with a 
dbh of 73 cm, followed by Retrophyllum vitiense (dakua salusalu) with a dbh of 68 cm 
and Heritiera ornithocephala (rogi or rosarosa) with a dbh of 65cm and Myristica spp. 
with  62  cm.  There  was  no  single  dominant  species  as  the  tree  sizes  were  evenly 
distributed amongst all species, but the combined biomass (as reflected in the dbh) 
of Syzygium sppand Myristica spp. gave a relative dominance of 54%. 
1.3.6
 
Cloud forest  
In the Greater Delaikoro Area, cloud forest is restricted to mountain tops and ridges 
above  850  m  and  is  almost  always  shrouded  in  clouds.  Precipitation  is  high  and 
temperatures are lower than the lowland areas. Trees in the cloud forest tend to be 
stunted and heavily covered with bryophytes. Cloud forest vegetation was assessed 
in eleven plots at Mt. Delaikoro and four plots at Mt Sorolevu. 
An average of 22 trees per plot (range: 13–39) with an average number of thirteeen 
species per plot (range: 10–17) was recorded for the area. The most common species 
were  Syzygium  spp.  and  Cyathea  spp.  occurring  in  thirteen  of  the  fifteen  plots 
assessed.  The  average  dbh  was  7  cm  (range  5–22  cm)  and  the  average  bole  height 
was 3 m (range: 1–6 m). The largest tree, with a dbh of 22 cm, was Elaeocarpus spp. 
(kabi).  Other  large  trees  included  Syzygium  spp.,  Agathis  macrophylla  (dakua 
makadre), Neuburgia spp. (bo), Litsea spp(lidi) and Saurauia rubicunda (mimila). The 
overall dominant species was Syzygium spp. with a relative dominance of 49%. 

17 
 
Other  species  observed  outside  the  plots  that  are  typical  of  cloud  forest  vegetation 
included  Metrosideros  spp.  (vuga),  Polyscias  corticata  (danidani),  P.  joskei,  Trimmenia 
weinmanniifolia,  Physokentia  thurstonii  (niuniu),  Clinostigma  exorrhizum  (niuniu)  and 
Pandanus vitiensis (vadra). 
Three  other  principal  vegetation  types,  the  upland  forest,  the  dry  forest  and  the 
talasiga vegetation types were not quantitatively assessed due to time and logistical 
constraints.  A  summary  of  observations  made  of  these  vegetation  types  is  given 
below. 
1.3.7
 
Upland forest 
Segments  of  upland  forest  were  observed  along  the  dirt  road  to  the  top  of  Mt. 
Delaikoro and along the track (unused logging road) to Mt. Sorolevu from Navakuro 
village  at  elevations  around  700m.  At  Delaikoro  some  of  this  forest  type  has  been 
planted  with  mahogany.  Some  of the  more common  tree  species  observed  in  these 
upland forests included Physokentia thurstoniiPlerandra spp. (sole), Elaeocarpus spp., 
Calophyllum spp., Agathis macrophylla, Dacrydium nidulum (yaka), Retrophyllum vitiense  
and Dacrycarpus imbricatus (amunu). 
1.3.8
 
Dry forest 
Most  of  the  native  dry  forest  vegetation  type  on  the  leeward  side  of  the  Greater 
Delaikoro Area has been almost completely destroyed by a combination of grazing, 
agriculture activities and fire. Remnants of this forest type may be observed north-
east of Mt. Delaikoro on the upper tributaries of the Labasa and Wailevu rivers. 
1.3.9
 
Talasiga grassland 
The  grassland  is  restricted  to  the  slopes  and  ridge  tops  and  is  mostly  made  up  of 
Pennisetum  polystachyon  (mission  grass),  Sporobolus  spp.  (wire  grass),  Dicranopteris 
spp.,  (qato  or  bracken  ferns),  Pteridium  esculentum,  Miscanthus  floridulus  (gasau  or 
reed),  Dodonaea  viscosa  (usi),  Casuarina  equisetifolia  (nokonoko)  and  many  other 
smaller  weedy  plants.  The  general  lack  of  tree  cover  is  characteristic  of  such  a 

18 
 
landscape.  The  grassland  is  regularly  set  on  fire  to  allow  for
 
regrowth  of  grass  for 
use  as  fodder  for  cattle  and  horses.  Most  of  the  lower  elevation  vegetation 
encountered  en  route  to  Mt.  Delaikoro  is  made  up  of  this  vegetation  type  and  a 
typical plant associated with this on Vanua Levu is Cycas seemannii (logologo). 
1.3.10
 
Woody shrubland habitat type 
This  vegetation  was  observed  growing  between  the  grassland  and  the  forest  edge 
and is also referred to as savannah grassland. The area was dominated by secondary 
pioneer plant species like Commersonia bartramia (sama), Parasponia andersonii (drou), 
Tarenna  sambucina  (vakaceredavui),  Trema  orientalis,  Dillenia  biflora  (kuluva), 
Decaspermum  vitiense  (nuqanuqa)  and  larger  patches  of  Schizostachyyum  glaucifolium 
(bitu wai) and Miscanthus floridulus. Also present here are exotic species like  Albizia 
saman  (raintree,  vaivai),  Spathodea  campanulata  (African  tulip),  Aleurites  moluccana 
(lauci),  Merremia  peltata  and  Piper  aduncum  (onalulu).  This  habitat  is  where  active 
agricultural  activities  are  occurring  both  at  the  subsistence  level  and  on  a  semi-
commercial  scale.  Gardens  or  plantations  of  Piper  methysticum  (yaqona),  Musa  nana 
(banana) and Colocasia esculenta (taro) are common and so are patches of abandoned 
(fallow)  gardens.  Such  activity  expands  the  grassland  habitat  types  into  forested 
areas  and  as  noticed  from  the  survey  will  continue  to  do  so  especially  with 
increasing pressure from subsistence farming and a growing population. 
1.3.11
 
River bank/riparian habitat type 
The  vegetation  along  the  creeks  and  river  systems  adjacent  to  the  grassland  was 
dominated  by  introduced  and  native  fruit  trees.  Also  found  here  were  important 
trees species that have cultural uses, such as Inocarpus fagifer (ivi, chestnut), Pometia 
pinnata (dawa), several species of Citrus spp., Artocarpus altilis (uto, breadfruit), Cocos 
nucifera  (niu),  Codiaeum  variegatum  (sacasaca),  Syzygium  malaccense  (kavika)  and 
Terminalia  catappa  (tavola).  Other  culturally  important  trees  include  Aleurites 
moluccana,  Bischofia  javanica  (koka),  Cananga  odorata  (makosoi),  Cordyline  fruticosa 
(qai) and Euodia hortensis (uci). 

19 
 
Intact  riparian  systems  were  observed  further  upstream  along  creeks  and  streams. 
Here  large  indigenous  tree  species  such  as  Sterculia  vitiensis  (waciwaci),  Neonauclea 
fosteri  (vacea),  Citronella  vitiensis  (nuqa)  and  Calophyllum  cf.  neo-ebudicum  (damanu 
dilo) were observed to be the dominant trees forming, in most cases, a closed canopy 
over the streams. Bryophytes on rock surfaces and over lower branches of trees were 
plentiful,  and  ground  cover  species  of  terrestrial  ferns,  Selaginella  spp.  and 
herbaceous urticales were common. 
1.4
 
Conclusion 
The key findings obtained demonstrate that the surveyed areas on Vanua Levu have 
high  botanical  prospects  for  both  future  work  and  research.  With  the  unexpected 
high  number  of  floristic  datasets,  new  range  extensions,  scientifically  important 
plants but more importantly the high list of indeterminants attained, a follow up or 
continued work with longer period in the centres and surrounding vicinities of the 
areas must be considered and adopted before making any conclusive statements. 
The new range extension of 207 species shows the lack of detailed floristic work on 
Vanua Levu especially in botanical hot spots such as the Greater Delaikoro Area. 
High altitude (> 600 m) forest systems to the south-east of Mt. Sorolevu and Waisali 
should  be  revisited  and  more  time  spent  botanizing  because  some  species  known 
only  from  their  type  localities  were  not  assessed  during  this  trip  due  to  time 
constraints and adverse weather conditions. 
Seasonality was also indicated as an important factor to consider for future surveys, 
to ensure that  flowering and fruiting collections can aid  in the full identification of 
specimens to the lowest possible taxonomic level. 
 
 

20 
 
2
 
Terrestrial Insects 
Hilda Waqa-Sakiti 
2.1
 
Introduction  
The first recorded entomological surveys conducted on Vanua Levu were in 1938 by 
E. C. Zimmerman from the Bishop Museum, Hawaii. In 2005 and 2006, the National 
Science  Foundation  (NSF)  funded  the  Fiji  Arthropod  Survey  which  included  the 
island  of  Vanua  Levu  (Evenhuis  and  Bickel,  2005).  In  2006  and  2008,  Van  Gossum 
and  colleagues  also  visited  the  island  of  Vanua  Levu  focusing  on  the  species 
diversity of the Fijian Zygoptera (Van Gossum et al., 2006; Van Gossum et al., 2008) 
In 2009, the Darwin Initiative funded a project titled Insect Inventories in Fiji, focusing 
on entomological surveys and included selected sites within Vanua Levu. 
In  September  2013,  a  baseline  survey  was  carried  out  with  the  primary  aim  of 
determining the general diversity of insects  within the areas of Delaikoro, Sorolevu 
and  Waisali  forest.  The  survey  targeted  a  diversity  of  habitats  (slopes,  flats,  ridges 
and  riparian  areas)  and  vegetation  types  (lowland  and  upland  systems  within 
primary,  secondary  and  native  forests).  A  variety  of  collection  techniques  (light 
traps,  leaf  litter  sampling,  active  and  opportunistic  surveys)  were  employed.  The 
general diversity of insects and those species of higher conservation value (i.e. focal 
species) were sampled as an indicator of the status or health of the forest within the 
Greater Delaikoro Area. 
2.2
 
Methodology 
 
2.2.1
 
Site selection and habitat considerations 
A number of key habitat types were surveyed (Figure 4) to maximise the chance of 
encountering  individuals  of  focal  species  as  well  as  to  adequately  sample  the 
diversity of insects. The location of each survey site is provided in Appendix 5. 

21 
 

 
Lowland  forest  areas:  targeted  specifically  to  find  Fiji’s  rare  endemic 
butterflies Papilio schmeltzi and Hypolimnas inopinata

 
Upland  forest  areas:  leaf  litter  sampling  and  light  traps  on  slopes  mainly 
targeted  the  general  diversity  of  insects  within  this  specific  habitat.  Active 
and  opportunistic  searches  for  the  endemic  phasmids  (stick  insects  or 
mimimata) were also conducted. 

 
Ridges:  leaf  litter  sampling  and  light  traps  on  ridges  targeted  the  general 
diversity  of  insects  found  within  this  specific  habitat.  A  high  diversity  of 
insects  (and  in  particular  the  focal  order  Coleoptera  and  the  macromoths)  is 
indicative of intact forest systems. 

 
Riparian  surveys  in  all  vegetation  types:  These  surveys  specifically  targeted 
butterflies (namely Fiji’s rare endemic butterfly, H. inopinata) and damselflies 
(namely  those  of  the  endemic  genus  Nesobasis).  These  often  fly  out  to  open 
areas  on  a  fine  day  in  search  for  sunlight  and  food,  and  usually  aggregate 
along  the  streams  in  forested  areas.  Their  presence,  abundance  and  richness 
are excellent indicators of forest and stream systems in good health. 
2.2.2
 
Nocturnal surveys 
 
Nocturnal  surveys  were  conducted 
using ultra violet (UV) light traps at the 
four sites (Figure 3). These were set up 
and left to run for 12 hour periods from 
6pm-6am (roughly dusk till dawn). 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə