Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

Figure  3:  UV  light  traps  for  nocturnal 
insects (Photo: Apaitia Liga) 

22 
 
 
Figure 4: Terrestrial insect survey sites within the project area 

23 
 
To  effectively  sample  moths,  manual  collections  were  conducted  for  the  first  two 
hours after dusk. A bucket trap was set up and operated in the center of a 2 m x 2 m 
white sheet which was spread on the ground at the collection site. Moths that flew 
towards the light and onto the white sheet were collected in killing jars charged with 
ethyl acetate.  
Beetles  and  other  nocturnal  insects  were  passively  sampled  overnight  on  each 
sampling occasion. Insect specimens were sorted to Order and then to Family level. 
Specimens  are  currently  being  curated,  catalogued  and  stored  at  the  South  Pacific 
Regional Herbarium, USP. 
2.2.3
 
Leaf litter surveys 
Leaf  litter  surveys  were  conducted  targeting  different  habitat  types  (i.e.  river  flats, 
slopes  and  ridges)  in  the  lowland  and  upland  vegetation  types.  Quadrats  of  1m
2
 
were laid at 10 m intervals along a 50 m transect. Leaf litter from each quadrat was 
sieved through 12 mm mesh sieves and transferred into Winkler bags (Figure 5). The 
Winkler  bags  were  hung  out  for  at  least  48 hours  to  allow  drying  of  the  leaf  litter. 
Insect specimens were stored in ethanol for further sorting and identification. 
 
Figure 5: Winkler bags filled with leaf litter (Photo: Apaitia Liga) 

24 
 
2.2.4
 
Opportunistic encounters- Lepidoptera (butterflies) and Odonates (damselflies) 
Butterflies  and  damselflies  were  opportunistically  collected  within  open  grassland 
and  riparian  areas  along  creeks  and  streams  using  handheld  nets.  Voucher 
specimens were taken for identification. 
2.2.5
 
Identification and curation 
Identification  of  specimens  was  carried  out  with  the  aid  of  available  taxonomic 
references  for  each  of  the  main  groups;  butterflies  and  moths  (Waterhouse,  1920; 
Robinson,  1975;  Prasad  and  Waqa-Sakiti,  2007),  dragonflies  and  damselflies 
(Donnelly, 1990; Van Gossum et al., 2006) and beetles (Lawrence and Britton, 1994). 
2.3
 
Results and discussion 
 
2.3.1
 
Insect Diversity 
The results of the  insect survey  at each site  are provided  in Appendix 4. A total of 
eighteen  Coleopteran  (beetle)  families  were  sampled  from  within  the  entire  study 
area.  The  most  abundant  taxa  sampled  included  the  beetle  families  Curculionidae 
(weevils) and Staphylinidae (rove beetles) and from the Order Hymenoptera, Family 
Formicidae  (ants).  Rare  beetle  families  Lampyridae  (lightning  bug)  and  Passalidae 
(bess beetles) were also encountered in the surveys. The diversity of the target taxa 
Coleoptera and the family Formicidae are a good indication that ecosystem services 
such  as  soil  processing,  decomposition,  herbivory,  pollination  and  seed  dispersal 
within the study areas are still intact. 
A total of 522 moth individuals belonging to seven families, 36 genera and 40 species 
were collected. Of the collected macromoth species, 50% are endemic to Fiji. The rate 
of  endemism  of  macromoth  species  collected  at  each  of  the  four  sites  ranged  from 
25% to 67%.  
The site with the highest diversity in terms of macromoth species  was the lowland 
rainforest of Delaikoro (<600 m), having a total of 24 macromoth species belonging to 

25 
 
six  families.  Mt.  Sorolevu  was  the  least  diverse  site  with  a  total  of  twelve  species 
from three families (Table 1)  
Table 1: Summary of the moth data collected from the four nocturnal survey sites. 
Site
 
Abundance of 
moths caught/site
 
Number of macro-
moth families/site
 
Number of 
macromoth 
species/site
 
Rate of 
endemism
 
Upland Forest
 
(Delaikoro)
 
103
 
4
 
12
 
25%
 
Lowland 
forest 
(Delaikoro)
 
167
 
6
 
24
 
45.8%
 
Waisali 
Forest 
Reserve
 
183
 
5
 
18
 
66.67%
 
Sorolevu - Savusa
 
69
 
3
 
12
 
58.33%
 
A  detailed  checklist  of  the  moths  collected  during  this  survey  is  provided  in 
Appendix  4.  There  are  two  new  records  of  macromoths  for  Vanua  Levu  and  these 
include  Luxiaria  sesquilinea  and  Hypena  rubrescens,  both  from  the  Noctuidae  family. 
The  latter,  Hypena  rubrescens  is  a  new  species,  recently  described  by  Clayton  (2010) 
who only has records of its collection from Viti Levu. 
Other endemic, uncommon or rare forest macromoths species include Gnathothlibus 
fijiensis  (Sphingidae),  Calliteara  nandarivatu  (Lymantriidae),  Sasunaga  tomaniiviensis 
(Noctuidae), and Tholocoleus astrifer (Noctuidae). 
2.3.2
 
Focal Species  
Order Lepidoptera 
Hypolimnas inopinata (Figure 6) is a rare butterfly, endemic to the Fiji islands. It is a 
montane  species  and  lives  in  rainforests.  It  is  often  found  in  or  near  pristine 
mountain  areas,  usually  in  semi-open  areas  along  streams  leading  up  to  the 

26 
 
mountains. Its presence and abundance has also proven to be a very good indicator 
of the pristine nature of the rainforest system.  
Hypolimnas  inopinata  has  so  far  been  only  recorded  on  Viti  Levu,  its  extant 
populations  are  in  the  forests  of  Navai  and  Nasoqo  (Ra  Province),  Waisoi, 
Wainavadu  and  Saliadrau  (Namosi  Province),  Naikorokoro  (Rewa  Province)  and 
Emalu  (Navosa  Province).  The  sighting  of  H.  inopinata  on  two  occasions  along  the 
Waicacuru stream, Sorolevu (Figure 4, survey points 48 and 49) is the first record for 
Vanua Levu. This habitat consists of primary lowland forest and is an ideal habitat 
for H. inopinata
 
Figure 6: Hypolimnas inopinata (Photo: Apaitia Liga) 

27 
 
Hypena  rubrescens  (Figure  7)  is  an  endemic  species,  described  in  2010.  It  has  been 
previously  recorded  only  from  Viti  Levu  (Savura  and  Namosi).  This  is  the  first 
record for Vanua Levu, found within the lowland forests of Delaikoro (Figure 4, site 
34) 
 
Figure 7: Hypena rubrescens, Noctuidae (Photo: SPRH) 
Luxiaria  sesquilinea  (Figure  8)  is  a  rare  and  endemic  moth,  usually  restricted  to 
primary forests. It has been previously recorded on Viti Levu (Serua, Suva, Naqali, 
Nausori highlands, Nadarivatu, Vunidawa, and Namosi) and Levuka (Ovalau). This 
is  the  first  record  for  Vanua  Levu  found  within  the  Waisali  native  forest  reserve 
(Figure 4site 26). 
 
Figure 8: Luxiaria sesquilinea Noctuidae (Photo: SPRH) 

28 
 
Order Phasmida 
Cotylosoma  dipneusticum  (Fig  6)  is  a  rare  endemic  stick  insect,  previously  recorded 
only  from  Taveuni  and  Viti  Levu  (Nakorotubu  range,  Emalu  forests  and  Savura 
Forest  Reserve).  Two  specimens  of  this  species  were  sampled  each  from  intact 
upland  forests  within  Sorolevu  perched  on  Balaka  seemannii  and  another  within 
Waisali  Forest  Reserve  on  the  bark  of  Timonious  affinis  (dogo  ni  vanua)  (Figure  4, 
sites 8 and 29).  
 
Figure 9: 
Cotylosoma dipneusticum, a rare endemic stick insect
 
Phasmatonea  inermis  is  another  rare  and  endemic  stick  insect,  previously  recorded 
only  on  Viti  Levu  (Nakorotubu  Range).  It  was  first  recorded  in  1908,  the  type 
specimens are currently housed in the Vienna Museum and the locality data on the 
specimens only mention SW Pacific, Fiji with no specific locality data. This will be a 
first record for Vanua Levu from within the primary upland Sorolevu forests (Figure 
4, site 11). From previous observations, these two species of stick insects have been 
known to be closely associated with intact forest systems. 

29 
 
2.4
 
Discussion and recommendations
 
The  survey  collections  yielded  a  good  diversity  of  insects,  suggesting  that  the 
ecosystem  services  provided  by  the  abundant  and  diverse  Coleoptera  (beetles,  18 
families),  Formicidae  (ants)  and  macromoths  (7  families,  40  species)  are  well 
represented, and that the forests systems remain intact.  
The  primary  lowland  forest  of  Sorolevu  harbours  three  of  the  five  focal  species 
recorded from this survey i.e. H. inopinataC. dipneusticum and P. inermis. These three 
focal species have proven to be excellent indicators of the good status and health of 
the forest system which suggests the same for Sorolevu. Waisali Forest Reserve was 
also interesting in that it recorded the greatest diversity of macromoths of the three 
sites (i.e. 18 species) with a high endemism rate of 66.67% followed by Sorolevu with 
twelve species and an endemism rate of 58. 33%. 
2.5
 
Recommendations 

 
Increased sampling efforts is required for the Delaikoro lowland and upland 
sites to ascertain the true status of the forest health and more comparable to 
the Sorolevu and Waisali sites. 

 
Further surveys  need to  focus on  H. inopinata to locate other populations on 
Vanua Levu. It will also be interesting to conduct a study on the population 
genetics  of  this  species  to  ascertain  the  status  of  the  Vanua  Levu 
population(s). 
 
 

30 
 
3
 
Avifauna  
Alivereti Naikatini and Senivalati Vido 
3.1
 
Introduction  
Fiji’s  bats  play  an  essential  role  as  seed  dispersing  agents,  major  pollinators,  and 
insect control agents in the rainforest and other terrestrial ecosystems (Palmeirim et 
al., 2007). Bats are the only native terrestrial mammals of Fiji and six species occur in 
Fiji,  four  of  which  are  native  and  two  endemic  (Flannery,  1995;  Palmeirim  et  al.
2007).  Four  bat  species  are  listed  as  threatened  (Palmeirim  et  al.,  2007).  Bats  are 
poorly  studied  in  Fiji  in  terms  of  ecological  research  and  there  is  little  public 
awareness of their role and importance. 
Like bats, birds are also very important indicators of the forest health. They are also 
seed  dispersers,  pollinators  and  insect  control  agents.  There  are  68  species  of  land 
birds  found  in  Fiji,  eleven  of  which  are  introduced  species.  Native  and  endemic 
species are expected to be found in greatest numbers in a pristine forest system.  
The Greater Delaikoro Area has been a focus area for bird and bat surveys in Vanua 
Levu  in  the  past.  A  notable  survey  was  carried  out  in  1974  in  the  Delainacau 
Mountains  (South  West  of  Mt  Delaikoro)  where  the  only  known  record  of 
Trichocichla  rufa  clunei  was  taken.  This  sub-species  of  the  Endangered  Long-legged 
Warbler  is  endemic  to  Vanua  Levu,  and  the  area  is  now  designated  an  Important 
Bird Area for Fiji.  No further sighting has been recorded since 1974. 
Other recent bird surveys carried out in the Greater Delaikoro Area were by Birdlife 
Fiji while carrying out the IBA (Important Bird Area) project for Fiji in from 2000 to 
2005,  and  by  PhD  student  Michael  Andersen  who  collected  bird  samples  in  the 
Waisali  Reserve  in  2008.  Previous  bat  surveys  in  the  area  have  been  conducted  by 
Ruth  Utzurrum’s  team  from  American  Samoa,  studying  the  status  of  Pteropus 
samoensis in 2001 and also by Jorge Palmeirin in 2003-2004 while reviewing the status 

31 
 
of  the  bats  of  Fiji.  A  recent  detailed  bat  study  was  conducted  in  the  Waisali  Forest 
Area from 2009 to 2011 by PhD student Annette Scanlon. 
 The main objectives of this survey were to:  

 
provide  a  checklist  of  all  avifauna  species  (birds  and  bats)  present  in  the 
Greater Delaikoro Area, 

 
highlight species that are of conservation importance (focal species), 

 
provide preliminary abundances of species present. 
3.2
 
Methodology  
The survey methods used in the survey were: 

 
Point count method (for both bats and birds) 

 
Mist  netting  in  open  high  areas  for  bats  at  night  and  birds  in  the  early 
mornings 

 
Bat detector surveys in the evenings 

 
Opportunistic surveys 

 
Interviews with local communities 
The point count method was the most commonly used method to survey for the bats 
and  birds.  It  was  only  carried  out  in  the  morning  and  afternoons  when  birds  are 
more active. Counts in a point were restricted within a 50 m radius for a period of 
five minutes according to an established methodology for a rapid survey (Naikatini, 
2009). Stations were not randomly located, due to the rugged terrain of the area, but 
were  placed  along  tracks  and  accessible  areas.  To  maximise  the  size  of  the  area 
covered, points were placed at least 200-400 m apart. This was also done to minimise 
the likelihood of double counts. Each morning or afternoon session would last two 
to four hours depending on the weather. 
 

32 
 
 
Figure 10: The location of the focal bat speciesPteropus samoensis and P. tonganus, in the study area 

33 
 
 
Figure 11: Location of bird survey points within the study area 

34 
 
All  birds  detected  within  the  50  m  radius  area  were  recorded  and  GPS  locations 
noted.  The  total  number  of  points,  birds  and  species  recorded  were  tabulated  and 
analysed to give the relative abundance or density of each species. Surveys of fruit 
bats  were  done  opportunistically  during  the  project.  A  TrakaBat  was  used  in 
evenings depending on places where we camped to track for presence of micro-bats 
overnight. The TrakaBat was prepared and set up in the early evening around 7pm 
and  then  retrieved  in  the  morning  and  the  data  downloaded  onto  a  computer  to 
determine if any passing bats were detected overnight. 
Opportunistic surveys were also conducted whilst travelling from one point station 
to  another,  or  whilst  travelling  within  the  area  from  one  base  camp  to  another. 
Interviews  with  the  local  guides  were  carried  out  on  some  evenings.  Local  guides 
knew the area well, including where the main bat roosts are located, and the species 
of birds they may have encountered in the area previously. 
3.3
 
Results and discussion 
In  total  approximately  230  minutes  were  spent  actively  conducting  bat  and  bird 
surveys, and over 36 hectares were covered using the point count method. A total of 
46 point stations were surveyed during the ten days of survey. These point stations 
(Figure  11)  were  located  in  different  sub-habitat  types  found  with  the  main 
vegetation  systems;  lowland  rainforest  (<600  m),  and  upland-cloud  rainforest  (600-
800 m).  
A  total  of  27  species  of  land  birds  and  three  species  of  bats  were  recorded  in  the 
study  site, and these are listed in  Appendix  6. Identifications were verified using a 
published  field  guide  (Watling,  2001).  A  table  of  the  location  and  habitat  of  each 
station  and  a  summary  of  the  species  diversity  and  bird  abundance  is  provided  in 
Appendix 7. 
Of the 27 species of land birds recorded, all were native species and no exotic species 
was recorded; 24 of these species are endemic to Fiji with nine of the 24 species being 

35 
 
restricted only to Vanua Levu and nearby islands (Appendix 1). The area surveyed is 
part of the Wailevu/Dreketi Highlands Important Bird Area (IBA X) covering an area 
of 720 km² (Masibalavu and Dutson, 2006)  
Eight  avifauna  species  have  been  recorded  from  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area 
previously,  which  are  considered  focal  species,  based  on  their  rarity  (Appendix  8). 
Five  of  these  were  recorded  during  the  current  survey  also,  the  three  exceptions 
being  the  Long  Legged  Warbler,  the  Friendly  Ground  Dove  and  the  Black-faced 
Shrikebill. 
The Long Legged Warbler, classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List (Birdlife 
International,  2012)  was  not  recorded  in  this  survey  as  we  did  not  survey  the 
Delainacau area, which is the only place it has been documented. However, we did 
survey areas in Waisali and Mt Sorolevu that have a similar  habitat and climate to 
the  Delainacau  area  but  were  unsuccessful,  perhaps  because  these  areas  have  been 
subjected to some form of disturbance from logging in the past. Other bird species 
like the Friendly Ground Dove and the Black-faced Shrikebill were not recorded in 
this  survey,  which  like  the  Long-legged  Warbler  are  sensitive  species  that  tend  to 
disappear  with  the  encroachment  of  disturbances  like  logging  and  other  forest 
clearing activities. 
Generally bird diversity and abundance during the survey was low. The only IUCN 
Red List species documented was  Pteropus samoensis. The only CITES-listed species 
recorded were the Tongan flying fox, the Pacific Harrier, the Collared Lory and the 
Fiji Goshawk. This would probably be due to the fact that the survey time was fairly 
short and the actual area surveyed was quite small. It also has to be noted that most 
of the places surveyed during the trip were areas that were easily accessible, which 
have  been  subjected  to  some  form  of  disturbance  in  the  past  like  logging,  thus 
affecting the results and not giving a true picture of the intact forest system. 

36 
 
Three  species  of  bats  were  recorded  throughout  the  survey;  Pteropus  samoensis,  the 
Samoan  flying-fox,  P.  tonganus  the  Pacific  flying-fox  and  Notopteris  macdonaldi,  the 
Fijian Blossom Bat (Figure 10). 
Pteropus  samoensis  is  listed  on  the  IUCN  Red  List  as  near  threatened  (Brooke  and 
Wiles, 2008) and N. macdonaldi as vulnerable (Palmeirim, 2008). P. tonganus was rare, 
not commonly encountered and no roost was recorded in the  study area. Likewise 
P. samoensis was also rare and only recorded in the forested areas near Mt Sorolevu. 
The local guides also said that there were no big roosts of P. tonganus in the survey 
area. There was no Notopteris macdonaldi roost found either, despite the fact that this 
species was commonly caught whilst mist-netting in the Mt Delaikoro Area. Like the 
bird  surveys,  the  bat  survey  was  not  extensive  due  to  time  constraints.  A  more 
comprehensive bat survey is needed for the future in this area, to mark out roosting 
areas  for  these  three  species  of  bats.  This  would  be  very  important  information  to 
obtain if this site is proposed as a protected area in the future. 
3.4
 
Recommendations 
To  better  understand  the  ecology  and  abundance  of  the  avifauna  of  the  Delaikoro 
Area  there  is  a  need  to  carry  out  more  quantitative  surveys  in  the  more  intact 
forested areas. This will enable us to get better population estimates, which will be 
useful  for  long-term  monitoring.  The  area  of  the  survey  is  quite  large  and  there 
needs  to  more  detailed  surveys  covering  as  much  of  the  area  as  possible.  A  more 
rapid  survey  approach  is  needed  for  the  bat  survey  in  the  near  future  to  record 
locations  of  bat  roosts  in  the  study  area  or  nearby  before  carrying  out  quantitative 
studies. 
Conservation should be a priority and logging should not be permitted in this area if 
you  take  into  account  the  true  value  of  the  site  in  terms  of  its  ecosystem  function, 
biodiversity,  cultural  and  spiritual  importance,  all  of  which  are  invaluable 
monetarily.
 
 

37 
 
4
 
Herpetofauna 
Nunia Thomas and Jone Lului 
4.1
 
Introduction 
Previous  herpetofauna  surveys  conducted  in  Vanua  Levu  have  documented  the 
presence  of  twenty  one  species,  of  which  eight  are  endemic,  ten  native  and  three 
introduced (Morrison, 2003; Morrison et al., 2004). Significant finds in Vanua Levu in 
the  past  are  the  rediscovery  of  the  endemic  and  endangered  Fiji  ground  frog, 
Platymantis vitianus (Morrison et al., 2004) and the discovery of an endemic species of 
skink,  Emoia  mokosariniveikau  (Zug  and  Einech,  1995).  To  date,  herpetofauna 
distribution on Vanua Levu is data deficient and this survey contributes to updating 
the herpetofauna list and mapping their distribution on Vanua Levu. The objectives 
of this baseline herpetofauna survey were to: 

 
identify ideal herpetofauna habitats within the Greater Delaikoro Area

 
employ different herpetofauna survey methods to generate a species checklist 
for the Greater Delaikoro Area. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə