Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

4.2
 
Methodology 
The  herpetofauna  surveys  were  conducted  over  seven  days  (26
th
  September  to  2
nd
 
October  2013)  in  various  sites  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area,  in  particular  the 
upland and lowland forests of Mt. Delaikoro, Mt. Sorolevu and the Waisali Reserve 
(Figure 12). The survey targeted ideal herpetofauna habitat and methods employed 
depended on the weather and logistics (Appendix 9). 

38 
 
 
Figure 12: Location of herpetofauna survey sites in the project area 

39 
 
Field Assessment 
Weather conditions dictated the number of days, type of traps and survey methods 
conducted, and these are summarized in Appendix 9. 
Habitat Assessment 
The  objective  of  the  expedition  was  to  record  all  herpetofauna  species  captured 
and/or  observed  within  the  study  site.  For this  reason,  all  potential  habitats  within 
good forest cover and outside of the forest were surveyed. The study area generally 
had ideal herpetofauna habitats: riparian vegetation, ridge forest, forest floor cover 
of leaf litter and rotting wood, and trees with dense epiphyte cover. Systematically, 
the survey targeted a ridge habitat, riparian forest habitat and lowland forest habitat, 
closely following the vegetation and entomology sampling areas. A total of 44 sites 
were surveyed employing the methods described below. 
Diurnal and nocturnal herpetofauna surveys 
There  are  several  accepted  methods  for  herpetofauna  surveys  that  generally  fall 
under  two  categories:  opportunistic  diurnal  and  nocturnal  searches  and  trapping, 
and  standardized  nocturnal  and  diurnal  searches  and  trapping.  A  summary  of  the 
methods used in this survey is given in Appendix 9. 
Herpetofauna  surveys  in  Fiji  have  generally  been  opportunistic,  but  their  methods 
standardized  to  allow  for  comparison  between  sites.  Long  term,  standardized 
herpetofauna monitoring plots exist on Viti Levu: the Sovi Basin Conservation Area 
and the Wabu Forest Reserve are limited to nocturnal frog searches. Because of the 
cryptic  and  heliophilic  nature  of  Fiji’s  reptiles;  and  Fiji’s  climate,  the  visual  survey 
and trap methods are used, albeit limited by weather conditions.  
The  herpetofauna  surveys  in  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  consisted  of  three 
techniques but were constrained by rain. These are described below. 

40 
 
Standardized sticky trap transects whereby sticky mouse traps (Masterline®) were 
laid out at intervals along a transect. Each station was designated a station number 
(1-10) with a cluster of three traps per station for three placements to represent local 
habitat  structure  at  each  location  (tree,  log  and  ground).  Transects  were  laid  out 
along  identified  ideal  habitats  e.g.  ridge  tops  and  along  river  banks/riparian 
vegetation. Leaf litter cover, canopy cover and undergrowth were all recorded. Left 
overnight (if possible), traps were checked regularly for captured specimens. These 
traps target both terrestrial and arboreal species. 
Standardized  (time  constrained)  nocturnal  visual  encounter  surveys  (2  hours)  in 
ideal  habitats  were  used,  since  frogs  and  geckoes  are  active  and  more  visible  at 
night.  This  method  gives  an  encounter  rate  for  comparison  with  other  surveys 
within Fiji. Search efforts with a minimum of two observers at any one time targeted 
streams, adjacent banks/ flood plains and ridge tops. 
Opportunistic  Visual  Encounter  Surveys  outside  of  the  standardized  searches 
allowed for a record of presence/absence of herpetofauna. Skinks are more likely to 
be seen during the day, particularly during hot and sunny conditions. Opportunistic 
diurnal  surveys  were  conducted  along  trails  en  route  to  the  camp  site,  vegetation 
plots, along stream edges, and in forest habitats surveyed by other survey teams in 
the expedition. Search efforts targeted potential skink habitat and sunbathing spots, 
and frog and snake diurnal retreat sites. Diurnal surveys began at 9am and ended at 
3pm on each of the survey days. The team had a minimum of two searchers at any 
one time. 
Environmental  variables  such  as  air  temperature,  water  temperature,  weather 
conditions  (rain/fine)  and  cloud  cover  (%)  were  taken  at  the  beginning  and  end  of 
each  nocturnal  survey.  Habitat  characteristics  and  other  basic  ecological  and 
biological  information  of  herpetofauna  found  were  recorded.  Observations  on 
possible threats to herpetofauna species and populations were also noted. 

41 
 
Geographic  coordinates  of  survey  sites  were  captured  using  the  Thales  Mobile 
Mapper Pro Navigator and Garmin GPSmap 60CSx
4.3
 
Results 
Average  air  temperatures  recorded  for  the  surveys  were  23.5
o
C  (day  time)  and 
20.8
o
C (night time); average water temperature was 17.3
o
C at night. Out of the eight 
days,  there  were  four  days  of  good  sunshine,  and  six  in  which  cloud  cover  was 
100%.  
Based on the current knowledge of herpetofauna on Vanua Levu there are a total of 
21 species recorded from the island, of which thirteen have been documented from 
within the Delaikoro Area (Morrison, 2003; Morrison et al., 2004).  
In total eight species were encountered over the course of the survey, in 34 of the 44 
sites  surveyed.  Four  of  the  species  encountered  are  endemic:  Emoia  concolor, 
Lepidodactylus  manni  (Figure  13),  Platymantis  vitianus  (Figure  14)  and  P.  vitiensis 
(Figure 15 and Figure 16). 
 
Figure 13: Lepidodactylus manni (Photo: Noa Moko) 

42 
 
 
Figure 14: Platymantis vitianus (Photo: Noa Moko) 
 
Figure  15:  Platymantis  vitiensis  (Noa 
Moko)  
Figure  16:  Platymantis  vitiensis  eggs 
(Photo: Apaitia Liga) 
Three  others  are  native:  Emoia  cyanura  (Figure  17),  Gehyra  oceanica  (Figure  18),  and 
Nactus  pelagicus,  and  there  was  one  invasive  species  also  recorded  (Bufo  marinus). 
These  findings  were  the  result  of  over  fourteen  man-hours  of  diurnal  survey,  436 
hours of sticky trapping and six man-hours of nocturnal surveys. 

43 
 
One species was reported to occur by local villagers: the native Pacific boa (Candoia 
bibroni), but was not encountered during the expedition.  
 
Figure 17: Emoia cyanura (Photo: Noa Moko) 
 
Figure 18: Gehyra oceanica (Photo: Nunia Thomas) 
Herpetofauna were observed on all the survey days through the methods employed. 
The  majority  of  the  species  were  encountered  during  opportunistic  surveys  (4 
species);  with  lower  encounter  rates  for  the  sticky  traps  (2  species),  and  standard 
diurnal (1 species) and nocturnal surveys (2 species).  

44 
 
Threats to herpetofauna were also documented. The presence of rats was evident on 
one  sticky  trap  (Mt  Delaikoro).  Additionally  the  mongoose  was  observed,  and  cat 
scat recorded at high elevations in the Mt. Sorolevu area. 
4.4
 
Discussion 
This  report  contributes  to  the  little  known  terrestrial  herpetofauna  of  Vanua  Levu, 
and more specifically the Greater Delaikoro Area. Despite the impact of introduced 
mammals  on  Fiji’s  terrestrial  herpetofauna  the  widely  documented  presence  of  the 
Fiji  ground  frog  on  Vanua  Levu  is  interesting.  Two  species  whose  extirpation  has 
been attributed to introduced mammalian predators such as feral cats, feral pigs and 
the  mongoose,  and  were  not  encountered  on  this  survey  area  are  the  two  large 
terrestrial skinks Emoia trossular and E. nigra
The low encounter rates and low diversity of herpetofauna in the study sites do not 
necessarily  mean  an  absence  of  the  species.  Low  encounter  rates  of  heliophilic 
species are not uncommon in Fiji’s rainforests and are typical globally in rainforest 
habitats (Ribeiro-Junior et al., 2006; Ribeiro-Junior et al., 2008). There are efforts being 
made  to  develop  better  quantitative  survey  methods  for  forest  dwelling 
herpetofauna. 
Sites to target for the establishment of long-term monitoring plots should ideally be 
adjacent  to  the  vegetation  sample  plots,  because  of  the  dependence  of  native 
herpetofauna on the health of the forest. 
4.5
 
Recommendations 
Considering  that  baseline  survey  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  has  now  been 
conducted,  the  best  option  available  will  be  to  build  on  this  by  conducting 
subsequent  surveys  and  standardizing  the  survey  techniques  especially  for  the 
sticky traps and frog surveys, carrying them out over different seasons and assessing 
species  densities.  Any  future  changes  in  terms  of  species  presence/absence  and 

45 
 
density  will  be  an  indication  of  the  status  of  the  habitat  and  forest.  It  is 
recommended that these intensive and dedicated surveys focus on a particular area 
or along standard transects. It is also recommended that tree climbing techniques be 
used to enable better capture rates of cryptic arboreal skinks and gecko species.
 
 

46 
 
5
 
Freshwater Fishes  
Lekima Copeland and Kinikoto Mailautoka 
5.1
 
Introduction 
The  effective  conservation  of  Fiji’s  freshwater  fish  requires  accurate  understanding 
of the distribution, taxonomic composition, endemicity, and local richness of species 
assemblages  across  the  Fiji  archipelago.  This  is  particularly  true  when  on  a  global 
scale the freshwater fishes of Fiji have been recently recognised in terms of endemic 
species per unit land area (Abell et al., 2008). The freshwater fishes of Fiji have only 
been  extensively  studied  in  the  last  decade  by  various  researchers  that  have 
discovered  species  new  to  science  and  elucidated  some  of  the  various  factors 
affecting  these  insular  fish  assemblages  (Jenkins  and  Boseto,  2005;  Boseto,  2006; 
Boseto and Jenkins, 2006; Jenkins, 2009; Jenkins and Mailautoka, 2010; Larson, 2010; 
Jenkins  and  Jupiter,  2011;  Copeland,  2013).  The  oceanic  islands  of  the  Pacific  are 
distinct from continental land masses in that they have developed unique freshwater 
fish  assemblages  that  have  important  ecological  linkages  between  marine  and 
freshwater  environments  (McDowall,  2008).  The  prospection  of  this  area  is 
important to improve our knowledge of freshwater fish distribution in Fiji. 
5.2
 
Methodology 
Due  to  the  remoteness  of  the  study  areas,  several  methods  of  gathering  data  were 
used. Unfortunately, the breakdown of the electrofisher meant that abundance data 
could not be gathered. The field methods described here were designed to enable the 
most  comprehensive  documentation  of  fishes  present  in  the  tributaries  originating 
from the Delaikoro mountain range. A portable Global Positioning System (Garmin 
eTrex 20) was used to take the position and altitude of the sampling sites. A map of 
the study area and several pictures of the locations sampled are provided. 

47 
 
Physiochemical parameters 
Before  fishing  commenced,  water  quality  parameters  were  recorded  to  minimise 
disturbances to in-situ water quality characteristics. Temperature, pH, conductivity, 
salinity  and  dissolved  oxygen  were  measured  using  a  commercial  handheld  GPS 
Aquameter and AP-1000 Aquaprobe. 
In-stream fish sampling 
The beach seine (3  m  x 2 m, 1 mm mesh)  was set and held by two people.  Several 
metres upstream one person kicked and dislodged rubble to enable the collection of 
bottom-dwelling fish. This was done for about an hour, over approximately a 100 m 
stretch  of  stream.  Snorkeling  was  also  undertaken  in  streams  sampled  and  visual 
observations were made from stream bank, as some species of the gobies are easily 
distinguishable due to their bright colours. 
Preservation 
Voucher specimens were collected, fixed in a 10% formalin solution and transferred 
to  70%  ethanol  solution  after  five  days  of  fixation.  Voucher  specimens  were 
deposited at the University of the South Pacific marine collection. 
5.3
 
Results and discussion 
Species richness 
Overall a total of eighteen species of fish from six families were directly observed or 
collected  (Table  2).  The  inability  to  use  the  electrofisher  contributed  to  the  low 
species number but even taking that into account Fiji’s fish fauna is impoverished in 
comparison  to  Melanesian  countries  to  the  west,  such  as  Papua  New  Guinea.  The 
community  structure  of  fishes  is  of  the  general  composition  expected  within  Indo-
West  Pacific  high  islands,  in  that  species  numbers  are  relatively  low  and  are 
characterized  by  amphidromous  species  (pelagic  lifecycle).  The  amphidromous  life 
history results in most of these species being found throughout Oceania.  

48 
 
 
 
Figure 19: Location of freshwater fish sampling sites 

49 
 
Table 2: Species checklist for the thirteen sites
1
 surveyed (*=endemic species) 
Family
 
Species
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
Anguillidae
 
Anguilla marmorata
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
X
 
x
 
Anguilla obscura
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eleotridae
 
Eleotris fusca
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hypseleotris guentheri
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gobiidae
 
Awaous guamensis
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
x
 
X
 
x
 
Lentipes kaaea
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
Redigobius lekutu*
 
 
 
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Redigobius leveri*
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
Sicyopterus lagocephalus
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
X
 
x
 
Sicypus zosterphorum
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
 
Stiphodon n. sp1*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
Stiphodon n. sp2*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
Glossogobius illimis
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kuhliidae
 
Kuhlia marginata
 
 
x
 
 
x
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
x
 
 
x
 
X
 
x
 
Kuhlia rupestris
 
 
x
 
 
 
x
 
x
 
 
x
 
x
 
 
x
 
X
 
x
 
Poecillidae
 
Poecilia reticulata
 
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cichilidae
 
Oreochromis mossambicus
   
 
 
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oreochromis niloticus
 
 
 
 
x
 
x
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total number of species
 
2
 
6
 
4
 
5
 
5
 
4
 
3
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
4
 
4
 
5
 
Four of the species collected are endemic to Fiji; the two described gobies Redigobius 
lekutu and R. leveri and the undescribed gobies Stiphodon n. sp. 1 and Stiphodon n. sp. 
2. Three invasive species were collected and observed during the survey. These were 
the guppy, Poecilia reticulata  and two species of tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus  and  O. 
mossambicus
The  dominant  element  of  the  fauna  is  the  gobioid  fishes,  mainly  members  of 
Gobiidae  and  Eleotridae.  This  assemblage  accounts  for  61%  of  the  overall  fauna. 
Members  of  the  gobiid  subfamily  Sicydiinae  (containing  Sicyopterus,  Sicyopus  and 
Stiphodon)  are  especially  prominent  in  clear,  rocky  streams,  which  constitute  the 
                                                 
1
 
1. Nasealevu Village 2. Upper Dreketi 3. Upper Doguru (1) 4. Upper Doguru (2) 5. Doguru village 
6. Qaraloaloa stream 7. Waicacuru stream 8. Suweni stream 9. Waisali stream 10. Camp site upper 11. 
Camp site 12. Camp site lower 13. Wai Koroalau.
 

50 
 
dominant  aquatic  habitat  in  the  interior  of  the  islands.  The  depauperate  species 
richness is a feature of insular systems of Oceania where this attenuation in species 
richness with increase in altitude has been documented by Jenkins & Jupiter (2011). 
The  highlight  of  the  survey  was  the  discovery  of  a  native  goby  Lentipes  kaaea  on 
Vanua  Levu.  This  specimen  had  only  been  found  previously  on  the  island  of 
Taveuni.  A  species  from  the  same  genus,  Lentipes  concolor  (endemic  to  Hawaii),  is 
renowned for its ability to surmount waterfalls over 100  m high.  The discovery of 
this  species  and  also  two  undescribed  gobies  in  the  genus  Stiphodon  showcases  the 
pristine water quality in this catchment. Amphidromous stream-cling-gobies of the 
genus  Stiphodon  comprise  an  important  component  of  the  fish  communities  in 
insular streams of tropical Indo-Pacific high islands.  
 
Figure 20: Amphidromous goby Lentipes kaaea, previously only recorded from Taveuni 
 
Most of the non-gobioid fishes are basically itinerant marine forms restricted to the 
lower  reaches  of  freshwater  streams.  The  first  significant  waterfall  usually  forms  a 
barrier to their upstream dispersal (Figure 21).  

51 
 
 
Figure  21:  A  waterfall  in  Cakaudrove  province  marks  the  upstream  limit  for  itinerant 
fishes such as Kuhlia rupestris and K. marginata
Water Quality 
Results  of  the  on-site  measurements  are  tabulated  in  Appendix  11.  Temperature  at 
the sites was between 19.7°C and 20.4°C. Dissolved oxygen levels were fairly  high, 
above  8  mg/l,  making  it  readily  available  for  fish  at  the  six  stations  sampled. 
Conductivity at all sites ranged from 0.047–0.084 

S which is well within the suitable 
habitat range for stream fish. Turbidity was very low at all sites (<10 NTU), and the 
bottom was visible at all the stations. 
5.4
 
Conclusion and recommendations 
The  proper  management  and  use  of  aquatic  resources  in  streams  originating  from 
the  Delaikoro  range  entails  a  holistic  approach  due  to  the  life-history  strategies 
employed by aquatic fauna that traverse different habitats throughout their life. It is 
true that management must begin at the catchment level; however, it goes hand  in 

52 
 
hand  with  the  protection  of  marine  and  coastal  habitats  such  as  reefs,  seagrass 
meadows, mangrove habitats, including the terminal reaches of rivers and streams. 
This  survey  found  two  endemic  gobies  (Redigobius  lekutu  and  R.  leveri)  and  two 
undescribed  gobies  from  the  genus  Stiphodon.  The  discovery  of  the  sicydiine  goby 
Lentipes kaaea highlights the importance of carrying out further work on the island of 
Vanua Levu. This goby has only been collected on the island of Taveuni and this is 
the first record for Vanua Levu.  
The  following  are  suggestions  for  the  proper  management  and  conservation  of 
aquatic fauna in the Delaikoro mountain range: 
1.
 
The  first  priority  is  protection  of  the  catchment  areas  originating  from  the 
Delaikoro  mountain  range.  The  headwaters  should  be  set  up  as  a  protected 
area  with  a  complete  ban  on  slash-and-burn  techniques  around  the 
catchments. 
2.
 
Secondly, the other major issue identified is the importance of restoring buffer 
zones around mid-reach sites. This will also require the proper education of 
farmers (landowners) on establishing farms near rivers, and the importance of 
a buffer width and restricting livestock access across streams. 
3.
 
Further  aquatic  biodiversity  research  is  needed  in  the  headwaters  of  the 
Delaikoro range especially for streams draining into Cakaudrove province. 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə