Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə5/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

 

53 
 
6
 
Freshwater Macroinvertebrates 
Bindiya Rashni 
6.1
 
Introduction 
The Fijian freshwater macroinvertebrate fauna is represented by 45 families, namely; 
25  families  of  insects,  eight  families  of  molluscs,  four  families  of  crustaceans,  three 
families  of  segmented  worms,  two  families  of  nematodes,  two  families  of  sponges, 
and one family of flatworms (Haynes, 1988; Haynes, 1999; Haynes, 2001; Jeng et al.
2003; Haynes, 2009). Many of these are yet to be fully described to genus and species 
level  and  many  aquatic  insect  larvae  need  to  be  matched  to  their  described  flying 
adults. 
Prior  to  this  study,  there  have  been  no  surveys  conducted  on  the  composition  of 
freshwater macroinvertebrate communities within the waterways of the study  sites 
detailed in this report or their tributaries. There is, however, some documentation of 
previous macroinvertebrate surveys in other waterways of Vanua Levu focusing on 
the  freshwater  gastropods  (Haynes,  1988;  Haase  et  al.,  2006)  and  Atyid  shrimps 
(Choy,  1991)  only.  These  studies  were  conducted  to  document  the  aquatic 
gastropods  and  shrimps  present  in  easily  accessible  streams  in  Vanua  Levu. 
Therefore the present study represents the first detailed and comprehensive study of 
freshwater  macroinvertebrates  and  the  aquatic  habitats  within  the  Mt.  Delaikoro, 
Sorolevu and Savusa catchments. 
The  key  objectives  of  the  study  were  to  provide  a  comprehensive  list  of  taxa, 
describe  community  structure  and  identify  taxa  that  are  unique,  rare  and 
endangered  in  Fiji.  This  report  also  provides  information  relating  to  water 
physicochemistry  that  supports  macroinvertebrate  communities  at  waterways 
surveyed  in  the  two  main  provinces  (Macuata  and  Cakaudrove)  of  Vanua  Levu.

54 
 
 
Figure 22: Location of macroinvertebrate sampling stations 

55 
 
6.2
 
Methodology 
Survey Stations 
During  the  Vanua  Levu  freshwater  survey  (September-October  2013),  eight  main 
stations  (VL1-VL8)  were  sampled  within  the  Macuata  province  and  four  major 
stations (VL9-VL11 and VL13) in Cakaudrove province. The catchments targeted in 
both provinces include waterways that supply water to the residents of Vanua Levu. 
The  descriptions  of  the  sampling  stations  are  summarized  in  Table  3  and  their 
locations  shown  in  Figure  22.  Photographs  of  the  habitats  of  the  sampling  stations 
are given in Appendix 12. 
Table 3: Macroinvertebrate sampling localities and methods used at each 
River/Stream 
Site 
Code 
Description 
Survey type 
Nasealevu village 
VL1 
Upstream 
Surber & Kick-netting 
Dreketi 
VL2 
Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Doguru 1 
VL3 
Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Doguru 2 
VL4 
Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Doguru village 
VL5 
Next to village 
Kick-netting 
Sorolevu/Qaraloaloa 
VL6 
Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Waicacuru 
VL7 
Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Doguru/Suweni river 
VL8 
Next to bridge-confluence  Kick-netting 
Waisali village 
VL9 
Next to village 
Surber & Kick-netting 
Waisali river upper 
VL11  Upstream 
Kick-netting 
Savusa-Savutagitagigagone  VL10  Upstream-above waterfall  Kick-netting 
Savusa-tributary 
VL12  Upstream-above waterfall  Hand-picking 
Spring-Savusa 
VL14  Upstream-above waterfall  Hand-picking 
Vunidogoloa 
VL13  Next to village 
Kick-netting 
Mt. Delaikoro 
VL15  Roadside spring 
Hand-picking 
Tabia-Savusavu 
VL16  Next to current logging site  Hand-picking 

56 
 
Water physicochemistry 
Water physicochemical parameters were measured at each sampling station using a 
calibrated  multi-parameter  water  quality  meter  (Aquaread  AP  1000).  Parameters 
measured included temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity (milisiemens 
per centimeter (mS/cm), pH, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), turbidity (Nephelometric 
Turbidity  Units
 
(NTU))  and  salinity.  Water  Quality  was  taken  only  at  major 
sampling stations where Surber sampling or kick-netting was carried out. 
Macroinvertebrate sampling 
Macroinvertebrate  samples  were  collected  using  both  quantitative  and  qualitative 
survey  methods  to  allow  an  assessment  of  macroinvertebrate  density  at  selected 
stations  and  to  compile  a  list  of  taxa  present  at  each  site.  The  quantitative  and 
qualitative sampling methods were adapted from Stark et al. (2001) and modified to 
suit the time period and objectives of this particular survey. 
Quantitative assessment – This is a quantitative method that provides a measure of 
macroinvertebrate  density,  adapted  and  modified  from  Protocol  C3  (Stark  et  al.
2001).  Three  replicate  Surber  samples  (area  0.1  m²,  0.5  mm  mesh)  were  collected 
from riffle habitats at stony streambed sites. A riffle is a shallow area (water depth 
≤ 0.5 m) where water flows swiftly over stones, creating surface turbulence. Samples 
were  collected  by  placing  the  Surber  sampler  over  a  defined  area  of  streambed  in 
riffle  habitat  and  disturbing  the  habitat  by  washing  the  particles  with  the  water 
flowing  through  the  net  to  collect  dislodged  macroinvertebrates.  Surber  sampling 
was only carried out for two sites; Nasealevu village [VL1] and Waisali village [VL9] 
due to time constraints. 
Qualitative assessment – a single sample was collected from each sampling station 
via  3-minute  kick-netting  over  five  metre  riffle  and  run  habitats,  or  hand-picking 
using  thumb  forceps  (opportunistic  collection)  where  necessary.  Typical  habitats 
sampled  included  runs,  riffles,  chutes,  pool edges,  woody  debris,  leaf  litter,  stream 

57 
 
edges, and tree roots along banks, stream bank vegetation and sand/silt substrates. 
The  purpose  of  multi-habitat  sampling  is  to  provide  a  list  of  taxa  at  the  selected 
station.  Kick-netting  was  carried  out  at  all  main  stations  (VL1-VL11  and  VL13), 
therefore it will be used for the majority of the data analysis. For the remaining sites 
(VL12 and VL14-VL16), opportunistic collection was conducted for taxa of interest. 
Macroinvertebrate samples collected were placed into 250ml specimen jars with 70% 
ethanol  for  sorting  and  identification  by  the  author  (Bindiya  Rashni).  Crustacean 
(prawn  and  shrimp)  specimen  identification  was  confirmed  by  Laura  Williams, 
crustacean specialist at the School of Marine Studies, USP. The guides referenced in 
the  identification  process  included;  Haynes  (2009),  Haynes  (in  prep.),  Haase  et  al. 
(2006),  Williams  (1980)  Winterbourn  et  al.  (2006),  and 
Marquet  et  al.  (2003),
  Choy 
(1983; 1991). Identified macroinvertebrates were preserved in 100% ethanol for long 
term storage. 
Data analysis 
Community composition and structure:  the combined Surber and kick-net data set was 
used to calculate the relative abundance of the main taxonomic groups. 
Macroinvertebrate  density:  an  assessment  was  made  of  macroinvertebrate  density  in 
riffle habitats at selected stony streambed sites based on quantitative Surber sample 
data by multiplying the mean Surber sample abundance data (per 0.1 m
2
) by a factor 
of ten to give abundance/m
2

Status & distribution of taxa: taxa were classified as endemic and native to Fiji, native 
to    other  regions  (e.g.  Pacific,  South  Pacific,  Indo-Pacific,  and  South  East  Asia), 
introduced tropical species or other (i.e. unknown for new records). 
Functional  feeding  group  (FFG)  assessment  –  FFGs  represent  the  mode  by  which 
macroinvertebrate  taxa  feed  (i.e.,  collector-filterer,  scraper,  grazer,  predator  or 
shredder).  The FFG assessment involved calculating the number of taxa within each 
FFG and the relative abundance each group made up across sampling sites. 

58 
 
Taxa  of  interest:  macroinvertebrate  taxa  of  potential  interest  suspected  to  be  a  new 
record for Vanua Levu or Fiji or to Science. 
6.3
 
Results 
Water physicochemistry 
The  water  physicochemistry  parametres  measured  at  the  different  stations  are 
summarised  in  Appendix  13.  Waterways  sampled  ranged  from  almost  neutral  to 
slightly  acidic.  The  freshwater  macroinvertebrate  communities  described  in  this 
survey  are  unlikely  to  be  significantly  affected  by  pH  values  within  this  range. 
Conductivity  is  a  measure  of  the  total  ions  in  water  and  ranged  between  1.110 
mS/cm  in  the  Nasealevu  village  waterway  (VL1)  and  0.054  mS/cm  in  the  Savusa-
Savutagitagigagone (VL10).  
Turbidity (NTU) is a measurement of particles in the water column and provides an 
indication of water clarity. Turbidity values ranged between 0 NTU in the majority 
of  sites  (VL2-VL5,  VL7,  VL8,  VL9,  VL10,  and  VL13)  to  2.4  NTU  in  the  Nasealevu 
village (VL1). Turbidity in Nasealevu village stream was higher due to heavy rainfall 
a  few  nights  ago  prior  to  surveying.  Turbidity  above  5  NTU  signifies  poor  water 
quality;  all  the  sampling  stations  had  turbidity  values  less  than  5  NTU.  In  the 
majority  of  waterways  surveyed  turbidity  values  were  0  NTU,  which  signifies 
excellent  water  quality  for  macroinvertebrate  survival  as  well  as  the  absence  of 
sediment-raising  activities  in  the  catchment,  or  at  least  not  within  the  range  of  the 
areas surveyed. 
Dissolved  oxygen  concentrations  ranged  from  8.97  g/m
3
  in  Waisali  village  stream 
(VL9)  to  8.24  g/m
3
  in  Vunidogoloa-Wai  Koroalau  stream  (VL13).  All  dissolved 
oxygen  concentrations  were  above  the  level  considered  sufficient  for 
macroinvertebrate  survival  (i.e.  >5  g/m
3
).    Waterway  hydrology  at  sites  surveyed 
was unaltered except for the upper Dreketi (VL2) which had a culvert and Doguru-
Suweni river (VL8) which had a bridge, but these do not seem to have affected the 

59 
 
DO levels required for survival of macroinvertebrates, although alteration of flow is 
highly  possible.  Salinity  measurements  at  the  survey  stations  demonstrated  levels 
that are expected in the waterways of any tropical inland river or stream. 
Taxa richness and abundance 
A total of 70 distinct macroinvertebrate taxa were collected across all sampling sites 
during  the  surveys  (Appendix  15  and  Appendix  16).  Macroinvertebrates  were 
distributed  among  the  taxonomic  groups  as  shown  in  Table  4.    The  most  diverse 
group  was  Insecta  with  48  taxa  and  representing  69%  of  the  total  number  of  taxa 
recorded.    Of  the  48  insect  taxa,  fourteen  were  dipterans  (true  flies),  eleven  were 
caddisflies  and  seven  were  mayflies.  The  next  most  diverse  taxonomic  group  was 
Crustacea (14 taxa) followed by Mollusca (6 taxa) and Annelida (2 taxa). 
Table  4:  Number  of  macroinvertebrate  taxa  recorded  in  each  of  the  taxonomic  groups 
across all sampling sites. 
Higher 
group 
 Order / Class 
Common name 
Number of 
taxa 
Insecta 
Trichoptera 
caddisfly 
11 
Ephemeroptera 
mayfly 

Lepidoptera 
moth 

Diptera 
true-fly 
14 
Zygoptera 
damselfly 

Anisoptera 
dragonfly 

Hemiptera 
water bug 

Coleoptera 
water beetle 

Crustacea 
Atyidae 
shrimp 
10 
Palaemonidae 
prawn 

Mollusca 
Gastropoda 
snails 

Annelida 
Oligochaeta 
worms 

The number of macroinvertebrate taxa recorded from sites ranged between nine taxa 
from  the  upper  Doguru  (VL3)  and  Vunidogoloa-Wai  Koroalau  (VL13)  and  26  taxa 

60 
 
from  the  Nasealevu  village  (VL1)  and  Waicacuru  (VL7).    The  Nasealevu  village 
waterway  (VL1)  supported  a  diverse  insect  fauna  (22  insect  taxa)  while  Waicacuru 
supported seventeen insect fauna and six distinct crustacean fauna.  
The  Upper  Doguru  (VL3)  and  Vunidogoloa-Wai  Koroalau  (VL13)  had  riparian 
vegetation  removed  (burning  &  cutting  down  of  trees)  and  easy  access  to  farming 
areas. The Upper Doguru (VL3) site supported low taxa richness, most likely due to 
changes  in  habitat  characteristics  as  this  site  was  dominated  by  chute  habitats 
supported  by  huge  rocks  and  deep  pools  unlikely  to  support  aquatic  insects.  The 
Vunidogoloa- Wai Koroalau (VL13) site was next to a village   with sluggish gravel 
dominated  uniform  run  habitat    reflecting    poor  aquatic  habitat  conditions  and 
general  absence  of  stable  aquatic  habitats  such  as  run-riffle-pool  sequence,  woody 
debris and overhanging stream bank vegetation.   
The Surber samples were just taken from the riffle habitats and it was only carried 
out  for  two  sites  while  kick-net  samples  were  consistent  throughout  the  sites 
covering multiple-habitats and hence kick-net data has been used for the majority of 
the analysis,  including taxa richness.  The difference  in taxa richness recorded from 
the different sampling methods is shown in Figure 23.  
 
Figure  23:  Comparison of  the  number  of macroinvertebrate  taxa  recorded  from Kick-net 
and Surber Samples 

61 
 
 Surber  samples  for  Nasealevu  village  (VL1)  site  showed  lower  taxa  richness  (16 
taxa) than kick-net samples (26 taxa) of the same site. However, Surber samples from 
Waisali  village  (VL9)  had  slightly  higher  taxa  richness  (16  taxa)  than  the 
corresponding kick-net samples (14 taxa). The Surber samples of the Waisali village 
site (VL9) had an additional two insect fauna than were sampled by kick-netting. 
Macroinvertebrate density 
A  summary  of  the  freshwater  macroinvertebrates  collected  and  their  abundance  is 
presented in Appendix 14. The abundance is given as numbers of individuals, and is 
also grouped into abundance categories as follows: very abundant (>100); abundant 
(20-99); common (5-19); few (2-4) and very few (1).  The overall (all taxa) abundance 
ranged from 2730 individuals/m
2
 at Waisali village site (VL9) to 4550 individuals/m
2
 
in Nasealevu village site (VL1). It is worth noting that only Surber samples (two sites 
only) were used to calculate density (Appendix 15). 
Insect  larvae/nymphs  were  the  most  dominant  taxa  at  all  sites.  This  was  strongly 
represented  by  caddisfly,  mayfly  and  dipteran  larvae.  This  result  is  typical  of  the 
headwaters of tropical inland streams. Insect larvae are well adapted to fast flowing 
waters of stream/river headwaters, compared to crustaceans and molluscs which are 
found in higher numbers in lower reaches of streams/rivers with swifter flows.  
The small Fluviopupa (<4 mm) snails (spring snails) were also recorded as abundant 
at  two  sites:  Doguru  village  (VL5)  and  Upper  Doguru  (VL3).  During  an 
opportunistic  collection  hand-picking),  these  snails  were  highly  abundant  in  an 
intact  spring  (VL14)  within  Savusa  catchment;  within  the  forest  reserve.  These 
particular gastropods are usually catchment  endemic and found in higher densities 
in  headwaters  with  narrow  channels,  swift  flows  and  very  clean  water.  They  have 
been found to be only present in streams undisturbed from cattle/horse grazing.  
The  damselfly  nymph  (Nesobasis  spp.)  was  also  abundant  at  two  stations:  Doguru 
village  site  (VL5)  and  Waicacuru  (VL7).  They  are  known  to  be  found  in  higher 

62 
 
densities in streams with overhanging vegetation, streamside root mass, open-partial 
canopy shading and good water quality; hence there abundance in these streams. 
The  macroinvertebrate  communities  documented  were  typical  of  inland  tropical 
stream  headwaters.  The  streams/rivers  sampled  provided  suitable  habitats  for 
diverse taxa composition. The sites surveyed had coarse stony streambed substrates 
and a high proportion of turbulent riffle/chute habitats, which resulted in caddisflies 
(Trichoptera)  and  mayflies  (Ephemeroptera)being  the  most  dominant  group  at  the 
majority  of  stations.  These  groups  combined  to  give  95%  (VL9),  87%  (VL2),  84% 
(VL5),  81%  (VL11),  75%  (VL4),  69%  (VL10)  and  62%  (VL8)  of  the  total  species 
recorded (Figure 24).  
 
Figure 24: Community composition by major taxonomic group 
An  exception  to  this  pattern  was  at  sites  VL1,  VL6,  &  VL13.  At  VL1,  the  Diptera 
group  was  more  abundant  than  the  Ephemeroptera,  and  together  with  the 
Trichoptera  comprised  80%  of  species  composition.  At  station  VL6,  the  Crustacea 
group  was  the  second  most  abundant  and  together  with  the  Ephemeroptera 
comprised 75% of species composition. At VL13, the Diptera group was the second 
most  abundant,  and  together  with  the  Ephemeroptera  comprised  96%  of  species 
composition. 
The most abundant caddisfly taxon (Figure 25) recorded was the net-spinning filter-
feeder  Abacaria  fijiana.  This  species  was  most  abundant  in  riffle  habitats  at  Doguru 
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
VL1
VL2
VL3
VL4
VL5
VL6
VL7
VL8
VL9
VL1
1
Vl1
0
VL1
3
Co
m
m
u
n
ity  
co
m
p
o
si
tion
 
(%)
 
Sites 
Trichoptera
Ephemeropter
a
Lepidoptera
Odonata
Coleoptera
Diptera
Crustacea

63 
 
village  and  Nasealevu  village  site  (VL1)  where  they  represented  between  55%  and 
31%  of  total  abundance  respectively.  Other  caddisfly  larvae  such  as  A.  ruficeps, 
Hydrobiosis  spp.,  Oxyethira  spp.  and  Odontoceridae  (case)  were  also  common  or 
abundant but generally represented less than 9% of total abundance, except at sites 
VL1  whereby  Odontoceridae  represented  21%  and  at  VL9  and  VL3,  Oxyethira  spp. 
represented 15% and 10% of the total abundance respectively.  
 
Figure 25: Macroinvertebrate community composition by taxa 
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
VL1
VL2
VL3
VL4
VL5
VL6
VL7
VL8
VL9
VL1
0
VL1
1
VL1
3
C
o
mm
u
n
ity
  c
o
mpo
si
ti
o
n
 (
%)
 
Sites 
Abacaria fijiana
Abacaria ruficeps
Anisocentropus fijianus
Odontoceridae (case)
Hydrobiosis spp.
Apsilochorema sp.
Oxyethira spp.
Trianodes fijiana
Goera fijiana
Pseudocloen spp.
Cloeon spp.
Caenis sp.
Nymphula spp.
Chironomus sp.
Corduliidae
Chironomidae spp.
Empididae
Caridina spp.
Muscidae
Macrobrachium spp.
Ferrissia sp.
Melanoides spp.
Fluviopupa spp.
Nesobasis spp.
Physastra nasuta
Unidentifiable species
Culicidae
Others

64 
 
Another  common  caddisfly  recorded,  the  leaf-case  Anisocentropus  fijianus,  was 
present in highest proportions in the Waicacuru (VL7) and Upper Doguru 2 (VL4), 
representing 27% and 22% of the total abundance respectively. Mayflies were also a 
dominant  taxonomic  group  recorded  at  survey  sites  and  represented  86%  of  the 
community in the Vunidogoloa stream (VL13) and 76% in the Waisali village stream 
(VL9).  
The most abundant mayfly taxon was Pseudocloeon spp. This is because Pseudocloeon 
spp. has a dorso-ventrally flattened body that allows it to graze on thin algal films 
covering  the  surfaces  of  large  boulder/cobble  substrates  in  turbulent  riffle/chute 
habitats.    In  contrast,  Cloeon  spp.  mayflies  which  are  mostly  associated  with  gentle 
flowing  habitats  and  are  more  common  along  stream  margins  and  runs  were 
recorded  in  much  lower  proportions  across  the  sites.  Therefore  many  Cloeon  spp. 
were part of the opportunistic collection. Another commonly recorded mayfly taxon 
was Caenis sp. but represented just under 10% of the total abundance except at sites 
Savusa- Savutagitagigagone (VL10) and Upper Dreketi (VL2),  where it represented 
16% and 11% of the total abundance, respectively. 
Conservation status and distribution of taxa 
A total of six macroinvertebrate taxa recorded as part of the survey were endemic to 
Fiji  and  represented  10%  of  the  total  number  of  taxa  recorded.    A  total  of  31 
macroinvertebrate taxa were Endemic/native (taxa that are known to be endemic to 
Fiji  but  the  species  are  yet  to  be  scientifically  named)  and  represented  51%  of  the 
total number of taxa recorded (Figure 26). Apart from a few unique specimens (~10), 
many of the endemic taxa recorded are common throughout the  headwaters of Fiji 
Island streams. The remaining 39% of taxa were either native to Fiji, the Pacific or the 
Indo-Pacific region, or introduced tropical species or unknown species. 
 

65 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə