Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

Figure 26: Status and distribution of macroinvertebrate taxa across all sites 
Figure 27 shows the total number of taxa recorded at each sampling station and their 
status/distribution  shown  as  a  proportion  of  total  taxa  richness  within  each 
community. The number of endemic and endemic/native taxa recorded at sampling 
stations  ranged  between  seven  taxa  at  Upper  Doguru  stream  (VL3)  to  22  at 
Nasealevu village stream (VL1). This amounted to 78% and 85% of the total taxa per 
sites respectively, highlighting that endemic or native species are the dominant taxa 
at  all  sites.  The  majority  of  endemic/native  taxa  recorded  were  insects;  inclusive  of 
both qualitative and quantitative collections (35 taxa in total).  
Other endemic taxa recorded were the small (<4 mm) spring snails (Fluviopupa spp.). 
All the crustaceans (shrimps and prawns) are native but also found throughout  the 
Indo-Pacific; the exception was the first record of two atyid shrimps (Caridina sp. A 
and Caridina sp. B) which have a very high chance of being new to science as these 
were compared to shrimp keys from Fiji, PNG, the Philippines and New Caledonia. 
There were also two new prawn records (Macrobrachium sp. A and Macrobrachium sp. 
10% 
51% 
7% 
3% 
18% 
1% 
3% 
7% 
Per
ce
n
tage 
o
f To
tal Taxa
 
Status & distribution 
Endemic
Endemic/Native
Native
Native,Pacific
Native, Indo-Pacific
Native, S.E.Asia-Pacific
Introduced,tropics
Unknown

66 
 
B)  which  did  not  match  the  taxonomic  keys  stated  previously.    These  specimens 
were placed under unknown origin. Two commonly introduced taxa found were the 
mosquitoe  larvae  (Culicidae)  and  the  Thiarid  snail  Melanoides  tuberculata.  The 
common  introduced  mosquitoe  larvae  (Culicidae)  was  found  at  Nasealevu  village 
(VL1)  while  M.  tuberculata  was  found  at  several  sites.  These  species  are  common 
throughout  streams  in  Fiji  and  the  Melanoides  snail  is  known  to  be  a  hardy  species 
that can successfully make its way to highland streams. 
 
Figure 27: Status and distribution of taxa across individual sites 
 A  lower  number  of  endemic-endemic/native  taxa  were  observed  as  part  of  the 
quantitative survey at upper Doguru (VL3) (7 taxa) and Vunidogoloa village stream 
(VL13)  (8  taxa).  This  is  probably  due  to  the  absence  of  a  stable  aquatic  habitat 
(natural  riffle-run-pool  sequence  coupled  with  stream  sides  trees  providing  mass 
fibrous  roots  extended  into  the  channel)  for  aquatic  insect  fauna  such  as  mayflies 
damselflies,  shrimps,  whirligig  beetles  and  caddisfly  species  which  generally 
contributes to the highest proportion of endemic-endemic/native fauna in Fiji inland 
streams.  Another  possibility  could  be  the  removal  of  stream  site  trees  that  would 
have  contributed  to  food  availability  of  the  macroinvertebrate  community.  The 
streamside trees provide leaf matter and indirectly maintain algal biofilms (prevent 
washing  away  of  sediments  that  would  otherwise  smother  the  algal  film  on 
submerged rocks), both of which are food sources for aquatic invertebrates. 
10
11
17
12
6
12
13
10
16
10
11
7
11
6
9
6
2
2
5
3
5
5
1
2
3
2
1
1
3
3
2
3
2
1
1
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
V
L1
V
L9
V
L1
V
L2
V
L3
V
L4
V
L5
V
L6
V
L7
V
L8
V
L9
V
l1
0
V
L1
1
V
L1
3
V
L1
2
V
L1
4
V
L1
5
V
L1
6
N
um
be
r o
f  
Ta
xa
Sites
Endemic
Endemic/Native
Native
Native, Pacific
Native,Indo-Pacific
Native, S.E.Asia-
Pacific
Introduced, tropics
Unknown
Surber
Kick-net
Hand-picked

67 
 
Functional Feeding Groups (FFG) 
Functional  feeding  groups  include  collector-filterers,  filter/gatherers,  scrapers, 
grazers, shredders and predators. An overview of macroinvertebrates and their FFG 
categories is presented in Table 5 with the relative proportions of each group at each 
site shown in Figure 28. 
Table 5: Functional feeding groups for freshwater macroinvertebrate taxa 
Collector-
filterers 
Scrapers 
Predators 
Shredders 
Filter/ 
gatherers 
Grazers 
Culicidae 
(mosquitoe) 
Anisocentropus 
(caddisfly)       
Hydrobiosis 
(caddisfly) 
Trianodes  
(caddisfly) 
Abacaria 
(caddisfly) 
Neritina  
(snail) 
Stratiomyidae 
(soldier flies) 
Goera  
(caddisfly)                           
Apsilochorema 
(caddisfly) 
Limonia  
(crane fly) 
Muscidae 
(stable fly) 
Physastra 
(snail) 
Scirtidae  
(marsh beetles) 
Odontoceridae  
(caddisfly) 
Corduliidae 
(dragonfly) 
Tipula  
(crane fly) 
 
Fluviopupa 
(snail) 
Chironomidae 
(midge) 
Cloeon  
(mayfly)            
Nesobasis  
(damselfly) 
Dineutus  
(whirligig beetle) 
 
Melanoides 
(snail) 
Simulium  
(black fly) 
Pseudocloeon  
(mayfly) 
Limnogonus  
(water bug) 
 Paralimnophila 
(crane fly) 
 
Ferrissia  
(snail) 
Stratiomyidae 
(solider fly) 
Nymphula  
(moth) 
Microvelia  
(water bug) 
  
 
 
Atyopsis  
(shrimp)                        
Oligochaeta  
(worm) 
Empididae  
(dance flies) 
  
 
 
Caridina  
(shrimp)                         
Caenis  
(mayfly) 
Athericidae 
(watersnipe flies) 
  
 
 
Psychoda 
(moth flies) 
Hydraenidae  
(minute moss beetle) 
Macrobrachium 
(prawn) 
  
 
 
Collector-filterers  were  diverse  and  ubiquitous  across  the  waterways  sampled  but 
low  in  relative  abundance  compared  to  the  scrapers.    The  collector-filterer  feeding 
group was represented by nineteen taxa while the scraper functional feeding group 
was represented by ten taxa. The scrapers were the most abundant group and made 
up  between  16%  (Nasealevu  village  site  -VL1)  to  93%  (Waisali  village  site-VL9)  of 
total  community  abundance  at  stony  streambed  sites.    Scrapers  recorded  included 
mayflies,  caddisflies,  oligochaetes,  moths,  beetles  and  snails.    The  most  abundant 
scraper  taxon  recorded  across  sites  surveyed  was  the  mayfly  Pseudocloeon  spp., 
which grazes on thin biofilms growing on stable in-stream substrates (e.g., cobbles, 
boulders,  leaf  litter).    Other  widely  distributed  scrapers  included  Cloeon  sp.  and 

68 
 
Caenis  sp.  (mayflies),  Odontoceridae  (caddisfly),  Anisocentropus  fijianus  (leaf-case 
caddisfly) and Nymphula spp. (moth).    
 
Figure 28: Proportion of total abundance that each functional feeding group made up at 
sampling sites 
 Filterer/gatherers  included  caddisfly  larvae  and  dipterans  and  also  represented  a 
major  component  of  the  macroinvertebrate  communities  recorded.  Only  three 
filterer/gatherers were recorded within this functional feeding group, but they made 
up  between  2%  (Vunidogoloa)  to  56%  (Doguru  village)  of  total  abundance.    The 
most  abundant  filterer/gatherer  taxon  was  Abacaria  fijiana  (caddisfly),  whilst  other 
widely  distributed  collector/filterer  taxa  included  A.  ruficeps  and  Muscidae  (stable 
fly).    Collector-filterers  were  represented  by  shrimps,  true-flies  and  beetles  and 
highly  diverse  (19  taxa)  but  of  low  relative  abundance  making  up  between  1% 
(Waisali village-VL9) to 25 % (Sorolevu-VL6) of community abundance at the sites. 
Predators were represented by caddisflies, damselflies, dragonflies, water bugs, true- 
flies and prawns.  The predator functional feeding group was diverse (13 taxa) but of 
low  relative  abundance  and  made  up  between  0%  (Vunidogoloa-VL13)  and  15% 
(Waicacuru-VL7)  of  community  abundance  at  the  sites.    The  shredders  were 
represented  by  only  five  taxa  making  up  between  0  and  4%  of  total  community 
abundance  across  stony  streambed  sites.    Shredders  recorded  included  Trianodes 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
VL1
VL2
VL3
VL4
VL5
VL6
VL7
VL8
VL9
VL1
1
VL1
0
VL1
3
C
o
mm
u
n
ity
 C
o
mpo
si
ti
o
n
 (
%)
 
Sampling sites 
Unknown
Grazer
Collector-filterer
Predator
Shredder
Scraper
Filter/gatherer
Macuata   
Cakaudrove 

69 
 
fijiana  (caddisfly  larvae),  beetles  and  cranefly  larvae  (Tipula  sp.).    The  highest 
proportion of shredders occurred at upland forested sites (Sorolevu mountain forests 
(VL6  and  Waisali  Forest  reserve-VL9),  where  leaf  litter  was  abundant  and  retained 
within  the  waterways  long  enough  to  be  assimilated.  The  shredders  are  known  to 
contribute only a minor component of macroinvertebrate community biomass in Fiji 
and  tropical  Pacific  Island  riverine  systems  (Bright,  1982;  Resh  et  al.,  1990;  Haynes, 
1999).  The  low  proportions  of  shredder  community  is  due  to  absence  of  stoneflies 
from  Fiji  ecosystems  and  the  nature  of  leaves  (food)  entering  streams  from 
surrounding  native  forests,  which  tend  to  be  tough  with  thick  cuticles  that  are 
broken down slowly (Haynes, 1999). 
Taxa of interest  
Certain  macroinvertebrate  taxa  that  were  recorded  during  the  freshwater 
macroinvertebrate  surveys  may  be  of  potential  ecological  interest  (pictured  in 
Appendix 17). Some of these taxa, such as Fluviopupa spp. and Nesobasis spp. have a 
very high chance of being new to science and either catchment endemic or endemic 
to Vanua Levu.  
These  taxa  are  very  good  bioindicators  for  state  of  streams  and  the  catchment  it 
drains;  ranging  from  highly  sensitive  to  resilient  species.  The  densities 
(individuals/m
2
)  of  these  species  reflect  the  state  of  streams.  These  species  have 
previously  being  surveyed  and  found  to  be  varying  in  abundance  in  slightly 
degraded to intact streams in Viti Levu. 
A major finding of this survey was a prawn species, Macrobrachium spinosum (Figure 
29)  which  is  a  new  record  for  Fiji.  This  species  was  first  discovered  in  Halmahera, 
Indonesia  in  2001  (Cai  and  Ng,  2001)  and  also  recently  collected  and  identified  in 
Vanuatu  (Keith  et  al.,  2011).  The  official  documentation  of  this  species  is  still  in 
process. 

70 
 
 
Figure 29: Macrobrachium spinosum 
6.4
 
Discussion 
The  freshwater  macroinvertebrate  community  (in  total  70  taxa)  of  Vanua  Levu 
survey  areas  showed  that  the  endemic/native  taxa  were  the  most  dominant  with 
insects making up the majority of the taxa. This is typical of inland tropical riverine 
system  headwaters.  In  comparison  with  other  studies  in    Fiji,  Viti  Levu  catchment 
headwaters    (by  the  author),  76  taxa  were  identified  from  waterways  in  the  Emalu 
area (Navosa highlands), 27  from Wainavadu creek, the headwaters of the Waidina 
river  and  32  taxa  were  identified  from  the  Wainibuka  river  headwaters  in  the 
Nakauvadra  range.  Waterways  in  the  Emalu  area  supported  much  higher  taxa 
richness  than  other  stream/river  headwaters  that  have  been  surveyed  in  Fiji  as  the 
headwaters  drained  intact  catchments.  The  Vanua  Levu  survey  areas  mostly 
supported secondary forest except some part of Waisali reserve and Savusa reserve. 
A  total  of  12  macroinvertebrate  taxa  collected  as  part  of  the  survey  may  be  of 
potential  ecological  interest  (Appendix  17).  These  include  four  species  of  mayfly 
nymphs  (Ephemeroptera:  one  Pseudocloeon  sp.  and  two  Cloeon  spp.  and  one  Caenis 
sp.),  four  species  of  damselfly  nymphs  (Odonata:  Nesobasis  spp.),  two  species  of 

71 
 
caddisfly  larvae  (Trichoptera:  Apsilochorema  sp.,  Hydrobiosis  sp.,  one  cranefly  larvae 
(Tipulidae:  Tipula  sp.)  and  one  snail  (Fluviopupa  spp.  (<4 mm).  These  taxa  are  very 
good bioindicators, ranging from highly sensitive to resilient species. Some of them, 
for example the Pseudocloeon sp. and the Cloeon sp A, are typical of pristine streams 
draining  intact  watersheds.  In  addition  special  taxa  such  as  the  spring  snails 
(Fluviopupa  spp.)  are  very  likely  to  be  catchment  endemic  or  area  endemic  species. 
Ten species of spring snails are already known to be endemic to Fiji, have restricted 
distribution and are usually catchment endemic, inhabiting springs and small creeks 
or  riffles  (Haase  et  al.,  2006). 
They  almost  exclusively  live  in  springs  and  in  the 
headwater of streams. The presence of these spring snails is indicative of very clean 
water. These snails are specialists with very low ecological amplitude; reacting to the 
slightest  difference  in  environmental  conditions.  They  are  mostly  threatened  by 
human  activities  that  lead  to  sedimentation  and  eutrophication  such  as  logging, 
mining,  intensive  agriculture,  forest  burning  and  removal  of  riparian  vegetation 
which results in the springs snail density decreasing or the population disappearing 
altogether (Great Basin EF, 2012)  
The  damselfly  nymphs  collected  (Nesobasis  spp.  W,  X,  Y,  Z)  were  morphologically 
different from those commonly found in Viti Levu streams and have a high chance 
of  being  endemic  to  Vanua  Levu.  Further  scientific  research  is  needed  to  confirm 
this. Additionally these larval stages will need to be matched to an adult stage before 
it  can  be  confirmed  if  they  are  a  new  species  or  not.  In  addition  this  survey 
documented for the first time two atyid shrimps (Caridina sp. A and Caridina sp. B), 
which have a very high chance of being new to science as these  were compared to 
shrimp keys from Fiji, PNG, Philippines, New Caledonia, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore 
and  Indo-West  Pacific.  There  were  also  two  new  records  of  prawn  specimens 
(Macrobrachium  sp.  A  and  Macrobrachium  sp.  B).  These  specimens  seem  to  have 
partial resemblance to Macrobrachium placidulum (Holthuis, 1952; Chace, 1997; Short, 
2004; Cai and Shokita, 2006; Cai et al., 2006; Cai et al., 2007). 

72 
 
Another interesting observation during the survey was the absence of the fingernet 
caddisflies  of  the  genus  Chimarra.  These  caddisfly  larvae  (Figure  30)  have  been 
observed  in  slightly  disturbed  to  intact  streams  in  Viti  Levu  and  has  been  highly 
abundant (average= 66 individual/m²) in intact (primary forested) catchment such as 
Emalu in Navosa highlands. Their absence in the areas surveyed could be due to the 
species  not  being  able  to  reach  the  areas  as  the  water  quality  recorded  supported 
their usual habitat water physicochemistry. 
 
Figure 30: Fingernet caddisfly Chimarra sp. (Philopotamodae) 
 

73 
 
7
 
Invasive Species 
Sarah Pene 
7.1
 
Introduction 
Invasive  alien  species  are  described  in  the  context  of  the  Convention  on  Biological 
Diversity  as  "alien  species  whose  introduction  and/or  spread  threaten  biological 
diversity"  (CBD,  2002).  The  Millennium  Ecosystem  Assessment  (UNEP,  2005) 
confirms that invasive alien species have been a significant driver of biodiversity loss 
over  the  last  century,  and  forecasts  that  this  trend  will  continue  or  increase  in  all 
biomes  across  the  globe.  Island  ecosystems  like  those  in  the  Pacific  are  particular 
vulnerable to the impact of invasive alien species (CBD, 2003). 
The list of plant invasives in Fiji  (Meyer, 2000) is currently composed of 52 species, 
classified under three groups according to their degree of invasiveness, namely: 13 
dominant invaders, 17 medium invaders and 22 potential invaders). 
Pernetta  and  Watling  (1978)  compiled  a  list  of  introduced  vertebrates  in  Fiji  which 
includes most of the globally common invasive species such as rats, mongooses and 
the  Indian  mynah.  Fiji  has,  however,   successfully  prevented the  entry of  the  giant 
African  snail  and  the  brown  tree  snake,  which  have  had  devastating  impacts  on 
other islands in the Pacific (Sherley, 2000). 
Invasive  species  management  in  Fiji  has  focused  for  the  most  part  on  control 
methods;  physical,  biological  and  chemical.  A  few  eradication  programmes  have 
been  implemented  on  small  islands,  for  example  Vatu-i-Ra,  where  the  Pacific  rat 
(Rattus exulans) was successfully eradicated to protect seabirds  (Seniloli et al., 2011). 
Whilst  eradication  programmes  are  feasible  for  small  isolated  islands,  it  is  not  a 
realistic approach for widespread plant and animal invasives in larger areas on the 
bigger islands. 

74 
 
This  invasive  species  survey  was  conducted  as  part  of  a  rapid  biodiversity 
assessment of sites in inland Vanua Levu that are being considered for designation 
as protected areas.  
7.2
 
Methodology 
A checklist of invasive plant species was compiled based on observations at all areas 
surveyed,  which  included  the  Mt  Delaikoro  summit  road,  the  Navakuro  to  Mt 
Sorolevu  road,  and  part  of  the  Waisali  reserve.  A  more  detailed  assessment  of 
invasive plant species was made on the Navakuro to Mt Sorolevu road. This logging 
road  has  been  made  within  the  last  10  years  and  ascends  close  to  the  peak  of  Mt 
Sorolevu,  Vanua  Levu’s  highest  mountain.  The  survey  team  followed  this  road  as 
close  as  possible  to  the  summit  of  Mt  Sorolevu,  making  records  of  invasive  plant 
species  encountered  along  the  way  that  were  visible  from  the  road.  These  points 
were georeferenced and aligned to the corresponding elevation profile of the track. 
A checklist of the invasive animal species was compiled based on reports from the 
vertebrate  fauna  specialists.  Both  direct  sightings  as  well  as  indirect  observations 
(scat,  chewing  marks  etc.)  were  recorded.  Where  reports  were  based  on  indirect 
observations  identification  to  species  level  could  not  be  reliably  made,  the  list 
indicates  the  possible  species  (“cf.”).  Invertebrate  invasive  species  (such  as 
agricultural insect pests) were not recorded. 
7.3
 
Results 
Invasive  plant  species  were  readily  observed  in  all  areas  surveyed,  and  as 
anticipated  were  most  abundant  in  disturbed  habitats  such  as  roads,  tracks, 
waterways,  agricultural  areas  and  near  human  habitation.  The  checklist  comprised 
21  species  (Appendix  18),  including  most  of  the  dominant  and  moderate  invaders 
listed by Meyer (2000). 

75 
 
The distribution of some of the most common invasive species along the altitudinal 
gradient on Mt Sorolevu is shown in Figure 31. A greater variety of invasive species 
were  observed  in  the  lowland  areas  nearer  to  human  habitation  and  agricultural 
land. 
The  giant  reed,  Arundo  donax,  was  very  common  sight,  not  only  along  the  many 
streams  and  rivulets  on  the  Mt  Sorolevu  track  (Figure  32),  but  also  along  the track 
itself.  In  areas  where  there  was  still  or  slow-moving  water,  such  as  ponds  and 
ditches, the presence of water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) was noted (Figure 33). 
Some species, such as Mimosa invisa, and Stachytarpheta urticifolia were very common 
along  most  of  the  track,  forming  thickets  or  large  stands  of  groundcover  along  the 
roadside. 
Merremia peltata was one of the most highly visible invasive species and dominated, 
not just as a blanketing climber over large shrubs and trees, but also spreading out 
over the road itself (Figure 34). Clidemia hirta, a very common shrub species, was less 
noticeable  at  the  lower  altitudes  but  became  more  visible  as  Merremia  became  less 
dominant at higher altitudes (Figure 35). 
Dissotis rotundifolia, classified as potentially invasive (Meyer, 2000), was recorded in 
great  abundance  along  most  of  the  track,  even  at  higher  altitudes.  Since  it  was 
flowering, the African tulip was visible at long distances, and was observed not just 
near  the  roadside  but  also  penetrating  into  forest.  The  individual  recorded  at  the 
highest altitude was at 500 m, over 5 km away from the village of Navakuro (Figure 
36). 
In  areas  of  intact  forest  (such  as  at  the  Waisali  reserve),  the  only  invasive  species 
generally observed were Clidemia hirta and the climber Mikania micrantha
 

76 
 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə