Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17

Figure 31: Elevation profile of Mt Sorolevu and invasive plant species recorded 
 

77 
 
 
 
Figure  32:  The  giant  reed,  Arundo  donax
was  common  along  waterways  as  well  as 
the side of the track. 
Figure  33:  Water  hyacinth,  Eichornia 
crassipes,  was  found  in  areas  of  still  or 
slow-moving water. 
 
 
Figure  34:  Low  altitude  track  dominated 
by Merremia peltata 
Figure 35:Higher altitude track, showing no 
encroachment of Merremia peltata 
 
 
Figure 36: An African tulip tree, Spathodea 
campanulata, growing over 100m from the 
road at an elevation of 750m 
Figure  37:  Tooth  marks  made  by  rats 
indicated  by  the  arrow  on  this  pandanus 
fruit,  located  at  900m  elevation  near  the 
summit of Mt Sorolevu 

78 
 
The  checklist  of  invasive  animal  species  is  given  in  Appendix  19,  and  comprises 
birds,  mammals  and  an  amphibian.  The  mammalian  invasives  are  generally 
domesticated animals, such as pigs, cats and dogs which have become feral, as well 
as  several  species  of  invasive  rodents  (mice,  rats  and  mongooses).  Evidence  of  the 
presence  of  rats  was  found  near  the  summit  of  Mt  Sorolevu,  at  almost  900  m 
elevation  in  cloud  forest.  Here,  pandanus  fruits  were  found  with  tooth  markings 
characteristic of rats (Figure 37). 
The invasive bird species, the bulbul and the mynah, were restricted to the low-lying 
areas near human habitation and agricultural land and pastures. 
7.4
 
Discussion 
As expected, the areas surveyed in Vanua Levu were home to a wide variety of the 
invasive  plant  and  animal  species  known  to  be  present  in  Fiji.  Whilst  for  the  most 
part  these  species  were  restricted  to  the  disturbed  areas  associated  with  roads, 
plantations,  tracks  and  settlements,  there  was  evidence  of  incursion  into  primary 
forest  areas  by  some  species,  in  particular  Clidemia  hirta,  a  highly  successful 
understory shrub; and rats, which appear to have penetrated to altitudes of almost 
900 m, 8 km away from the nearest human habitation. 
The impacts of invasive species can be both direct and indirect, and some effects are 
immediate whereas others are more long-term. Rodents such as mongooses and rats, 
for example can have immediate and devastating effects on native birdlife by killing 
adults and juveniles and feeding on eggs. They can also have a long-term effect on 
the regenerative capacity of certain plant species by feeding on their seeds or fruit. 
Invasive plant species can impact on the native flora generally through the process 
of  outcompeting  them,  since  invasive  plants  tend  to  have  very  rapid  growth,  high 
dispersal capabilities and high reproductive success. 
Any proposal for a protected area will have to take into account how to protect the 
biodiversity  in  the  area  from  the  negative  impacts  of  invasive  species.  Invasive 

79 
 
species  are  an  inevitable  threat  to  protected  areas  not  just  from  surrounding  or 
marginal localities, but also from disturbed habitats within the protected area itself. 
Invasive species control and/or monitoring should be a component of any proposal 
for  the  designation  and  long-term  management  of  a  proposed  protected  area  in 
Vanua  Levu.  Without  management  to  prevent  and  address  invasive  alien  species, 
protected area values, including ecosystem services and biodiversity, will inevitably 
be eroded (Poorter et al., 2007). 
 
 

80 
 
8
 
Archaeological Survey 
Elia Nakoro and Sakiusa Kataiwai 
8.1
 
Summary 
The Greater Delaikoro Area is rich in historical and cultural material remains many 
of  which  are  being  documented  here  for  the  first  time.  According  to  elders  in  the 
villages surrounding the Delaikoro mountain range, historical remains are believed 
to be scattered throughout the entire study zone, forming a widespread distribution 
of elaborate hilltop and lowland settlement and fortifications. Regrettably, many of 
these sites were not visited during this survey period due to the poor choice of field 
guides. 
Nevertheless, several sites were encountered and recorded both within and outside 
the  study  boundary.  Some  of  these  were  sites  that  have  been  previously  recorded 
and mapped by the Fiji Museum. 
Generally,  the  archaeological  finds  during  this  survey  have  considerable  cultural 
value  to  the  local  community  as  well  as  at  national  level.  The  significance  of  these 
sites  can  be  determined  and  derived  by  deconstructing  the  value  of  the  individual 
sites into the following components: aesthetic, symbolic, social, historic, authenticity 
and spiritual values.   
8.2
 
Introduction 
Archaeological investigation on Vanua Levu is somewhat limited due to its location 
and size. The centralised  cultural and archaeological activities on  Viti Levu further 
contribute to the poor documentation and survey of cultural sites on Vanua Levu. In 
his paper, the late Aubrey Parke
2
 generally stated that Vanua Levu regrettably lacks 
evidence  of  remains.  The  gap  in  the  information  is  probably  due  to  the  evidence 
                                                 
2
 Parke was a Colonial District Officer in the early 60’s and also an archaeologist by 
profession. 

81 
 
simply not being recorded. He  also stated that cultural sites found on Vanua Levu 
may be different from those found on Viti Levu (Parke, 1961; Parke, 1970). 
Between 1960 and 1980, G. Parker, L. Thompson, K. Moce and A. Parke established 
the  first  records  in  the  documentation  of  archaeological  surveys  for  Vanua  Levu. 
This  provided  the  collection  of  151  sites
3
  which  are  recorded  in  the  Fiji  Museum’s 
national  register  of  cultural  sites.  However,  a  considerable  amount  of  work  which 
was  contributed  by  Parke,  Frost  and  Cabaniuk  is  not  captured  in  the  national 
register,  one  of  the  loopholes  in  the  current  system.  Studies  have  also  been 
undertaken recently by Professor David Burley of Simon Fraser University, Canada 
who  focused  mainly  along  the  coasts  in  identifying  Lapita  sites  or  sites  of  initial 
island  habitation.  It  should  be  noted  that  Burley,  in  collaboration  with  the  Fiji 
Museum, was able to confirm an early Lapita occupation on Vorovoro Island dating 
to as early as 3000 years before present (BP) and no later than 2900 BP (Burley, 2012). 
This  report  aims  to  document  the  collaborative  biodiversity  and  archaeological 
survey  carried  out  by  the  Fiji  Museum  and  the  University  of  the  South  Pacific  in 
2013. The archaeological component of the survey focused on outlining the cultural 
connection  the  land  has  to  the  people,  with  an  emphasis  on  identifying  and 
describing  cultural  sites  of  significance  for  which  there  is  tangible  evidence.  The 
study  focused  on  those  people  living  along  the  foot  of  the  mountain  range  that 
divides  the  windward  province  of  Cakaudrove  from  the  leeward  province  of 
Macuata. Some of the villages visited, e.g. Nasealevu, Sueni and Lomaloma, possess 
a  rich  historical  background  with  ancestral  ties  and  links  connected  to  the  forest 
within  the  study  area  in  which  their  generational  history  and  cultural  livelihood 
have  been  strongly  maintained.  The  forest,  mountains  and  other  natural  features 
along the range plays a primary role in the cultural identity and history of the people 
                                                 
3
 107 sites in Macuata Province, 40 sites in Cakaudrove Province and 40 sites in Bua 
Province. 

82 
 
of  the  two  provinces,  as  their  forefathers  inhabited  the  area,  utilizing  its  resources 
and settling extensively throughout the land. 
8.3
 
Methodology 
With  the  assistance  of  village  guides  and  through  collaboration  of  oral  history  and 
correspondence, areas of interest were identified and located. Location data of each 
site  was  captured  utilizing  a  GPS  unit  (Garmin  GPSmap  76CSx).  Site  notation  was 
carried out and photographs taken with a Fujifilm Finepix AX. 
8.4
 
Results 
During the field survey, a total of eleven sites were documented. Their locations are 
shown in Table 6 and a brief description of each site is given below. 
Table 6: Summary of archaeological sites documented 
Site Name/ID  Site type 
Site evidence 
Vegetation 
zone 
Coordinates 
Date visited 
Lat. 
Long. 
 
Nukubolu 
Q23-00001 
ring ditch 
fortification 
fortification ditches, 
causeways and house mounds 
lowland 
-16.656132  179.3589  Oct 1994
4
 
Muaicivicivi 
Q23-00002 
hill 
fortification 
house mounds  
lowland 
-16.653511  179.3578  Oct 1994 
Vanua ni yadra 
Q23-00004 
look out 
fortification ditch 
lowland 
-16.657613  179.3601  Oct 1994 
Bulubulu i Lele 
Q23-00005 
burial 
burial mounds 
lowland 
-16.655773  179.3593  Oct 1994 
Nabuna 
Q23-00006 
koro makawa  mound stones 
lowland 
-16.596363  179.364 
27/09/2013 
Unknown 
Q23-00007 
house mound   house mound 
lowland 
-16.636638  179.3713  30/09/2013 
Unknown 
Q23-00008 
house mound  house mound 
lowland 
-16.638145  179.37 
30/09/2013 
Unknown 
Q23-00009 
house mound   house mound 
lowland 
-16.624576  179.2088  01/10/2013 
Unknown 
Q23-000010 
house mound  house mound 
lowland 
-16.626521  179.2068  01/10/2013 
Qaraivini 
Q23-000011 
cave 
skeletal remains 
lowland 
-16.562849  179.2273  01/10/2013 
Unknown 
Q23-000010 
koro makawa  House mounds 
lowland 
-16.596424  179.36401  27/09/2013 
                                                 
4
 These sites were surveyed by Christine Burke, Hiroshi Kiguchi and Sepeti Matararaba in 
1994  
 

83 
 
 
Figure 38: Cultural sites location in the Greater Delaikoro Area visited during the survey. 

84 
 
8.4.1
 
Site descriptions 
Nukubolu/Q23-00001 
Defined as a ring ditch fortification, this site (Figure 39) incorporates various cultural 
features of house mounds, burials and causeways that are associated to the cultural 
site. 
 
Figure 39: The overgrown site of Nukubolu 
Altogether,  a  total  of  five  house  mounds  with  stone  alignment  were  identified 
including  two  burials  (Bulubulu  i  Lele/Q23-00005)  situated  on  raised  land  to  the 
northeast. 
 
Figure 40: Signboard placed at the home and also the resting place of the deity god Lele 

85 
 
The  site  is  traditionally  linked  to  the  district  of  Koroalau,  as  their  cultural  fortress 
during  the  era  of  tribal  warfare  and  cannibalism  in  Fiji.  The  site  displays  a  partial 
preserved state as the area is currently being utilized for agricultural purposes with 
crop farming and cattle breeding occurring in the area and contributing severely to 
the  site  disturbance.  The  ring  ditch  fortification  extends  along  a  diameter  of 
approximately  60  m  with  the  ditch  feature  only  occurring  along  the  north  and 
partially  covering  the  west  with  both  identified  causeways  included  along  this 
system. The southern section of the site is unclear due to severe damage by flooding 
and  agricultural  activities.  Thus,  an  accurate  description  of  the  ring  ditch 
environment could not be made. 
Apart  from  the  ring  ditch  site,  the  team  also  inspected  a  hill  situated  195  m  to  the 
south of the site (Figure 41), which according to the local communities was a lookout 
point or vanua ni yadra (Q23-00004). The hill site contains a ditch feature that dissects 
the  west  portion  of  the  hill  site  including  other  features  of  stone  alignments, 
however, much of this alignment was not visible due to overgrown vegetation. 
 
Figure 41: View of Nukubolu fortified site from the lookout vantage point 

86 
 
The  sites  of  Nukubolu  and  Muaicivicivi  have  been  the  subject  of  previous  surveys 
carried  out  by  the  Fiji  Museum.  The  Archaeology  Department  of  the  Fiji  Museum 
had undertaken detailed inspection and mapping of both sites over a period of three 
phases  between  the  11
th
  October,  1994  and  20
th
  October,  1995.  The  basis  of  this 
assessment  was  for  the  development  of  an  eco-tourism  project  proposed  by  the 
Nukubolu Eco-Tourism Board from the village of Biaugunu, however, as a result of 
the recent monitoring inspection of the Nukubolu site, additional disturbances was 
identified  and  this  is  a  major  concern.  The  protection  of  what  remains  not  only  of 
this  site  but  other  identified  sites  within  the  project  area  is  a  key  component 
integrated within the relevant policy that would greatly assist in the awareness and 
importance  conveyed  to  local  communities  on  the  cultural  significance  and 
development contributed through such sites.  
 
Figure  42: A  map  of  the  Nukubolu  Ring-ditch  fortification  as  recorded  in  October,  1994 
(Burke and Matararaba, 1994)

87 
 
Muaicivicivi/Q23-00002 
This  site  displays  a  significant  number  of  cultural  features  that  are  well  preserved, 
distributed extensively. The site area covers approximately 95 m x 75 m, according to 
the layout of cultural features. The area is flanked by two creeks – the Davatu creek 
flowing  along  the  northwest  while  Cabeu  creek  is  situated  along  the  southeast. 
During inspection, the team was not able to sufficiently identify the actual layout of 
the  site  including  additional  cultural  features  as  the  site  area  is  densely  vegetated, 
dominant  of  Urochloa  mutica  (Paragrass)  and  Piper  aduncum,  locally  known  as 
yaqoyaqona. 
 
Figure  43:  Field  guide  clearing  a  highly  raised  and  intact  house  mound  with  stone 
alignment at Muaicivicivi cultural site 
Altogether, a total of six house mounds were identified, displaying stone alignment 
with a particular mound of significance situated along the bank of the Davatu creek, 
to the east of the site area, displaying a stepped structure reaching a height of 2 m 
and  dimensions  of  7  m  x  6.5  m.  According  to  local  guides,  additional  mounds  are 

88 
 
situated  around  the  area,  however,  due  to  the  thick  vegetation,  it  could  not  be 
viewed during inspection. 
 
Figure 44: Detailed mapping of the Muaicivicivi site as recorded in June, 1995 (Burke et 
al., 1995) 
Nabuna/Q23-00006 
Cultural  features  could  not  be  ascertained  as  the  site  area  has  undergone  severe 
disturbances through agricultural activities (Figure 45). The site is primarily utilized 
by  local  communities  for  subsistence  crop  farming,  which  has  greatly  affected  the 
state  of  preservation  of  the  site.  These  agricultural  plots  have  permanently 
demolished  cultural  features  that  may  have  existed  with  only  remains  of  mound 
stones that are scattered among the site surface. The cultural landscape is uncertain, 
however,  with  oral  accounts  associated  to  the  site  area  with  its  significance 
confirmed from local guides, the site has been noted. 

89 
 
 
Figure 45: Agricultural activities that have permanently obliterated Nabuna old village 
Unknown/Q23-00007 
Defined by a single house mound, this site may represent a temporary settlement as 
no other associated features were evident in the area. This mound is rectangular, 6 m 
x 5m and is gradually eroding as the mound is situated along a declining ridgeline 
which is vulnerable to erosion processes, as evident during inspection. 
Unknown/Q23-00008 
The  site  consists  of  two  earthen-raised  mounds,  both  displaying  rectangular 
structure.  This  site  is  a  typical  settlement,  situated  on  flatland  along  the  ridgeline. 
The  site  area  covers  approximately  30  m  with  additional  cultural  features  situated 
within  the  site  zone,  however,  due  to  various  disturbance  factors,  these  possible 
features have been permanently destroyed. 
 

90 
 
Unknown/Q23-00009 
The  site  is  located  along  a  ridgeline  within  the  Waisali  study  area.  The  area  is 
significant  as  rock  boulders  are  strewn  over  the  site  surface,  possibly  belonging  to 
rock formations that were once constructed in the area.  
Through detailed inspection, a raised mound was discovered about 50 meters to the 
east of the initial area of significance, this mound measured at 8 m x 7 m, displaying 
a rectangular-structure and raised at 150 cm. through this finding, it would be logical 
that the rock boulders were an associated feature to the identified mound, possibly 
stonewall  barricades  which  had  been  altered  through  years  of  disturbance  factors, 
primarily  from  natural  processes.  The  vegetation  in  the  area  was  dominated  by 
vukavuka. 
Unknown/Q23-000010 
Defined by three house mounds that have undergone disturbance, this site depicts a 
temporary settlement typical during the migration lifestyle of early Fiji. The mound 
structures are diminutive in size and have all been affected by erosion processes, as 
evident during inspection. Evidence of human occupation was initially derived from 
the anthropogenic plants predominating in the area: Codiaeum variegatum (sacasaca), 
Amomum  cevuga  (cevuga),  Freycinetia  milnei  (vukavuka)  and  Cordyline  terminalis 
(vasili). 
Qaraivini/Q23-000011 
The  three  villages  at  the  foot  of  the  Delaikoro  mountain  ranges  are  Vatuwa, 
Nasealevu and Viriqilai. These remote villages are 30 km from  Labasa town center 
and, according to some of the village men, there are numerous other cultural sites of 
old villages and fortifications that exist and are intact in the mountains.  
Qaraivini  is  a  small  cave  (Figure  46)  located  west-southwest  of  Nasealevu  village 
and was accessed through Viriqilai village. This is a man-made cave, constructed by 
people who sealed off the bottom of a rock outcrop with boulders to bury their dead. 

91 
 
Several meters directly below the cave mouth is a remnant of what appears to be a 
ring  ditch  fortified  settlement.  Due  to  time  constraints,  it  was  impossible  to 
investigate  the  cultural  feature.  However,  the  cave  was  thoroughly  examined.  In 
size, the cave can fit two adults to lying horizontally on the floor.  
The  content  of  the  cave  is  astonishing  as  a  total  of  57  skulls  and  three  incomplete 
craniums  were  tallied,  piled  and  some  were  buried  under  the  rest  of  the  skeletal 
remains. Outside the cave mouth which was raised to about one and a half meters 
from  the  ground,  several  skulls  were  aligned  as  if  to  decorate  the  phase  of  the 
outcrop and the boulders. In close examination, it is possible that 34 were males, 23 
females  while  three  were  unknown.  Amongst  the  60,  less  than  ten  of  these  were 
children judging by the size of the skulls. 
 
Figure 46: Field guides from Nasealevu posing in front of the small cave entrance 

92 
 
Outside the cave, four shaped poles close to 2 m in length stand below the entrance. 
The poles according to Sepeti Matararaba, a senior archaeologist at the Fiji Museum, 
could  have  been  used  to  close  the  cave  entrance  by  levering  the  huge  boulders  to 
seal off and hide the bodies. 
According  to  the  village  men  and  women,  the  dead  are  the  victims  of  the  measles 
epidemic  that  wiped  out  almost  a  third  of  Fiji’s  total  population  in  1875.  It  was 
believed  that  the  ship  that  brought  Ratu  Seru  Cakobau  from  Australia  introduced 
the deadly disease. 
Unknown/Q23-000012 
This  site  is  situated  beside  the  main  access  road  in  the  area.  It  has  been  disturbed 
through various forms of agricultural activities also considering the resulting effect 
of  the  construction  of  the  access  road  in  the  area.  The  site  is  predominantly 
overgrown with paragrass and Ageratum conyzoides, locally known as botebotekoro. 
The site has been utilized by local communities for agricultural purposes with taro 
plots and some banana plants. 
Upon  detailed  inspection,  the  team  managed  to  identify  two  house  mounds  that 
displayed  scattered  stones  that  were  once  embedded  along  the  mound  walls.  The 
cultural  landscape  is  evident  with  the  identified  mound  forms  and  other  possible 
features,  however,  these  could  not  be  determined  due  to  the  deficient  state  of  the 
site. 
8.4.2
 
Monitoring sites 
The  increasingly  intensive  use  and  modification  of  the  landscape  resulting  from 
modern demands for efficient  infrastructure and land use  (agricultural production, 
mining,  energy  sources,  logging,  telecommunications  etc.)  exerts  growing  pressure 
on cultural heritage in the landscape.  
A summary of the threats and disturbances affecting the sites is provided in Table 7. 

93 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə