Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə8/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   17

Table 7: Site disturbance factors and threats within Delaikoro study area 
Type of 
disturbance/threat
 
Disturbance/threat 
description
 
Sites affected
 
Nature
 
These threats occur 
naturally and cause 
irreversible damage - 
tropical cyclones, 
earthquakes, heavy rain 
and erosion processes 
contribute to changing 
and shaping the natural 
and cultural landscape.
 
All the sites documented the effects of natural 
events on the remains of cultural heritage site 
features. The dominant natural element affecting 
the structures is heavy rain which leads to the 
erosion of the edges of the house mounds, 
infilling of fortification ditches and causeways. 
Heavy rain also results in fluvial formation of rills 
and gullies thus displacing stone alignment and 
washing away the material remains. 
 
Human
 
These are threats that are 
caused or related to 
human inhabitance & 
activities in and around 
the area of study.
 
About 95% of the sites identified contained 
human trails, for travelling between provinces or 
for hunting and gathering.
 
Animal
 
These are threats that are 
caused or related to 
animals-grazing, breeding 
and inhabitation activities 
specifically wild pigs
 
Pig hooves and snout trails covered about 60-
70% of the sites surveyed. Dog trails were also 
encountered but pose little threat to the sites. 
 
The  eleven  culturally  significant  sites  encountered  and  documented  during  this 
survey  are  widely  distributed  across  the  study  area,  five  of  which  are  within  the 
study  area  while  four  are  located  outside  the  study  boundary.  Since  the  Delaikoro 
study  boundary  is  vast  and  accessibility  is  hindered  by  rugged  terrain,  the 
Archaeology  team  recommends  that  a  thorough  investigation  be  carried  out  by 
utilising field guides. These guides, who frequent the study area as pig hunters and 
food  gatherers,  could  identify  sites  that  are  outstanding  and  noteworthy  for 
preservation  and  monitoring.  A  summary  of  the  framework  within  which  this 
monitoring could occur is presented in Table 8. 

94 
 
Sites  identified  can  be  used  for  comparison  of  threats  that  affect  cultural  heritage 
sites.  The  degradation  of  the  sites  will  be  examined  every  two  years  by  using 
traditional  methods  of  site  visitation  and  capturing  still  images  of  the  area  during 
the period of the FAO program. Data from other teams such as aerial/satellite images 
of  the  forest  cover  can  also  be  a  tool  used  for  the  process  depending  on  data 
availability. 
Table 8: Indicators and monitoring plan for cultural sites 
Theme
 
Indicators 
 
Monitoring Tool
 
Reporting 
 
Cultural 
heritage sites
 
State of the sites
 
Assessing the current state of the sites 
and monitor the changes through time
 
Assessment 
report every 2 
years
 
Threats to the sites
 
Identifying the threats that affect the 
state of the sites
 
Access to the sites
 
Choosing two sites for the assessment 
of the above variables with access to 
the site as comparison 
 
Cultural  valuation  of 
the sites
 
The two sites differ in cultural value
 
Remote  sensing  even  though  costly,  could  also  be  a  useful  tool  to  map  out  the 
changes in the monitoring site by using laser-based sensors and radar in particular 
Synthetic  Aperture  Radar  to  see  the  ground  or  surface  changes  or  identify 
subsurface remains. 
8.5
 
Conclusion 
According to several elders from the villages of Sueni, Nasealevu and Vunidogoloa, 
the land belonging to the different mataqalis included in the Delaikoro study area is 
rich  in  historical  cultural  material  remains  that  have  never  been  documented.  The 
historical  remains  are  scattered  all  throughout  the  study  area,  most  of  which  are 
symbolic and associated with the old religious and superstitious beliefs of early hill 
tribes of Vanua Levu. 

95 
 
The  study  of  the  cultural  footprints  within  the  Delaikoro  study  area  is  vital  in 
understanding  the  patterns  and  motivational  factors  related  to  inland  migration: 
why  the  early  iTaukei  people  chose  to  live  in  such  remoteness  and  rugged  terrain, 
socio-cultural  relations  and  their  responses  to  altering  natural  and  climatic 
conditions. 
Generally,  the  archaeological  finds  during  this  survey  have  considerable  cultural 
value to the local community and at national level. The significance of these sites can 
be determined and derived by deconstructing the value of the individual sites  into 
the  following  components;  aesthetic,  symbolic,  social,  historic,  authenticity  and 
spiritual values. All the sites identified include one of these values while some may 
incorporate all, however an absent values does not lessen the significance of a site as 
it holds the ancestral history of the hill tribes of Fiji. 
8.6
 
Conservation recommendations 
Fiji  has  an  ancient,  complex  and  unique  cultural  heritage  preserved  in  its 
archaeological sites. Unfortunately much of this record has been carelessly destroyed 
through  human  activity.  The  large  scale  of  current  and  planned  land  development 
activity  in  Fiji  poses  a  great  threat  to  remaining  sites.  Preservation  activities  are 
therefore  crucial  to  saving  Fiji’s  archaeological  heritage.  Fiji’s  archaeological 
environment represents a valuable and  irreplaceable record of the nation’s  cultural 
and social development. For this reason alone it is important that these sites be well 
maintained.  In  addition  to  its  historical,  cultural  and  archaeological  merits  the 
historic  heritage  also  forms  a  readily  available  resource  of  considerable  amenity, 
education, scientific, recreational and tourism value to the people of Fiji and visitors 
alike. 
The  archaeological  assessment  revealed  valuable  information  pertaining  to  the 
different  mataqali  landowners  within  the  Delaikoro  mountain  range  and 
neighbouring  communities  historically  linked  to  the  land.  Various  findings  of 

96 
 
cultural  assets  were  able  to  ascertain  that  these  ancestral  sites  conveyed 
immeasurable knowledge and understanding of the history pertaining to traditional 
and cultural developments, linked closely to the identity of its people. It depicts the 
movement  and  settlement  patterns  of  their  ancestors  and  the  forms  of  survival 
which defined their everyday lives. 
Such  history  must  be  preserved  whether  tangible  or  intangible,  however,  various 
threats and disturbances of these cultural sites have, to an extent, altered important 
aspects  of  material  history  of  the  vanua  of  Cakaudrove  and  Macuata.  All  the  sites 
identified  are  protected  in  Fiji  under  the  Preservation  of  Objects  of  Archaeological 
and Palaeontological Interest Act (1940). 
Our recommendations are: 

 
that proper documentation of the assessment and oral history be undertaken 
to avoid the loss of traditional knowledge and history of the study area. 

 
the Fiji Museum Archaeology department is included in any future surveys to 
allow for completion of assessments of areas that have been overlooked. 

 
that pig hunters and food gatherers from the villages at the periphery of the 
study  area  (Nasealevu,  Dogoru,  Navisei,  Nabuna,  Lomaloma,  Vunidogoloa, 
Korosi,  etc.)  be  used  as  field  guides  in  identifying  features  and  places  of 
cultural heritage significance in their respective hunting grounds. 

 
That  a  presentation  of  significant  findings  be  done  to raise  awareness  in  the 
region, an activity for which the Fiji Museum is available. 
 
 

97 
 
9
 
Socioeconomic Baseline Study 
Patrick Fong 
9.1
 
Introduction 
The  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  has  been  identified  as  an  important  terrestrial 
biodiversity area due to its pristine nature and for its roles in supporting ecosystem 
services. Located in the interior of Vanua Levu, the Greater Delaikoro Area consists 
of  three  high  densely  forested  peaks:  Nasorolevu,  Waisali  and  Delaikoro.  Mt 
Delaikoro  is  a  key  area  in  terms  of  development,  as  it  is  the  location  of  the 
communication  towers  that  receive  telecommunication  signals  from  mainland  Viti 
Levu and transmit to other parts of Vanua Levu. 
The  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  supports  local  communities  in  terms  of  food  security 
and  economic  development,  and  also  is  an  important  water  source  for  the  major 
rivers  in  Vanua  Levu.  Understanding  the  social,  cultural,  economic  and  livelihood 
importance  of  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  is  important  in  the  quest  to  sustainably 
develop  and  protect  it.  Unless  policy  makers  align  resource  management  policies 
with  community  livelihood  needs,  resource  management  programs  are  most  likely 
to  fail  or  be  unsustainable  in  the  long  term. Community  resource use  patterns  and 
seasonal trends of important activities are just some of the few examples of typical 
information  that  needs  to  be  considered  if  conservation  programs  are  going  to  be 
planned and implemented in this region. 
To  conserve  Fiji’s  terrestrial  biodiversity,  protected  areas  should  be  managed  as  a 
coordinated  system  and  scientific  perspectives  on  ecological  sustainability  need  to 
incorporate  social  science,  in  particular  human  behaviours  and  aspirations.  This  is 
important given that human behaviour and aspirations are generally the drivers of 
resource degradation and overexploitation. 

98 
 
In this study, information on the livelihood relevancy of the Greater Delaikoro Area 
is the main focus. The area has been identified as a potential protected area in Fiji’s 
State  of  the  Environment  Report  (1995)  and  the  Fiji  National  Biodiversity  Strategic 
and  Action  Plan  draft  report  (1998),  due  mainly  to  its  ecological  and  watershed 
significances. 
The  overall  goal  of  this  survey  was  to  better  understand  the  economic  and  social 
settings of people living around the potential protected area of the Greater Delaikoro 
Area  and  to  better  understand  people’s  view  and  attitudes  towards  the  proposed 
protection of the forest. Specific objectives were to understand: 

 
the economic situation of people living in the Greater Delaikoro Area, 

 
people’s use of the forest and how much this contributes to their livelihoods, 

 
their  attitudes  towards  the  conservation  of  the  forest  and  their  ideas  about 
what they would like to see created to protect the forest. 
This information, together with that provided by the biodiversity assessment team, 
will provide a package for the relevant authorities in Fiji to develop a management 
program of the area that takes into account the  linkages between  natural resources 
and community livelihood needs. 
9.2
 
Methods 
The study used both primary and secondary data sources. It blended qualitative and 
quantitative  methods  of  inquiry  buttressed  by  participatory  research  techniques.  A 
mixture of key informant, focus group and household interviews were conducted at 
all  the  study  sites.  All  interviews  were  conducted  in  the  common  Fijian  language 
(Bau dialect) by the interviewers; and the information was recorded in English. 
To  maintain  a  collaborative  effort,  all  stakeholders  in  the  study  sites  were  first 
informed prior to any field visits. The Macuata and Cakaudrove Provincial Council 
Offices were informed of the research during a reconnaissance visit, and later on, the 
eight  villages  were  contacted  and  informed.  During  this  consultation  activity, 

99 
 
relevant stakeholders were also consulted and some background information related 
to the study sites was collected. Through this exercise, the team was able to identify 
possible key informants and focus groups to be interviewed. 
9.2.1
 
The study sites 
The  survey  was  carried  out  in  six  villages  in  Cakaudrove  Province  (Nakawaga, 
Biaugunu,  Nabalebale,  Levuka,  Suweni  and  Navakuru),  and  two  in  Macuata 
Province  (Dogoru  and  Nasealevu).  These  sites  are  all  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro 
Area  and  were  sampled  to  provide  the  general  socioeconomic  setting  of 
communities within this region. 
9.2.2
 
Focus groups and key informants 
A team consisting of seven members visited the eight study sites during the period 
of  25  September  -  2  October,  2013.  In  each  village,  interviews  were  held  with  the 
village chief and other key personnel to explain the study and to elicit background 
information on the village. The key informant interviews and focus group discussion 
gathered  qualitative  data  using  open-ended  questions  which  were  then  used  to 
support  the  explanations  for  some  findings  from  the  statistical  analysis.  The 
intention of the focus group discussions and key informant interviews were to gain 
insights into: 

 
general perceptions of the Greater Delaikoro Area 

 
general perceptions on the livelihood importance of the forest 

 
cultural importance of the forest area 

 
perceptions on waste management, hygiene and sanitation 

 
resource governance and village social systems 

 
access to and use of resources and rights  

 
vulnerability (including maintenance of cultural and spiritual values) 

 
resource threats and resource management opportunities 

100 
 
The  focus  group  discussions  were  conducted  in  small  groups  of  4-10  individuals 
who work together or have similar social responsibilities within the study site. Three 
focus group discussions from each village were undertaken: with the village elders, 
the women’s group and the youth group. The key informants interviewed in all the 
study  sites  consisted  of  a  range  of  people  including  local  chiefs,  village  headmen, 
youth leaders, women’s group leaders and village elders. 
The  focus  group  discussions  and  key  informant  interviews  were  followed  up  by 
interviews with 20 different households in the village.  In villages  with less than 20 
household all households were interviewed. A household was defined as all people 
sharing  the  same  kitchen  and  who  work  together  to  “put  food  on  the  same  table” 
through  economic  activities.  The  village  headman  helped  the  researchers  select  the 
20 households in each village. As a general guide the survey aimed to interview five 
relatively  wealthy  households,  ten  of  medium  wealth  and  five  relatively  poor 
households. Interviews took on average two hours to complete.  
9.2.3
 
Questionnaire survey 
Quantitative  data  were  collected  in  this  interview  using  a  structured  questionnaire 
(see  Appendix  20).  The  questionnaire  administered  included  questions  about  the 
household,  its  members,  ages,  sex,  education  levels  and  occupation,  followed  by 
questions  about  house  structure,  possessions,  livestock  and  land  under  farming. 
These were followed by questions about their use of the forest, fuel wood collection, 
and  water  collection.  Questions  were  then  asked  about  what  the  household 
consumed  each  month  and  also  how  much  they  produced  in  their  fields  and  the 
value  of  these  products  in  the  market.  Use  of  forest  products  was  similarly 
quantified  to  estimate  the  value  of  the  resources  collected  from  the  forest  to  the 
annual income of the household. This was followed by questions about fishing and 
the  income  derived  from  that.  Finally  the  questionnaire  asked  for  responses  to  the 
idea of creating a protected area, and the benefits and problems that could arise. 

101 
 
9.2.4
 
Data processing and analysis 
A data code sheet was developed by the team, and used to code the data uniformly 
for  data  entry  purposes.  The  data  was  then  entered  and  analyzed  using  MS  Excel. 
The research team specified the most crucial questions to be analyzed and the kind 
of  analysis  needed.  Some  of  the  survey  questions  allowed  the  respondent  to  give 
more than one response. The advantage of this method of inquiry is that it allows the 
respondent  to give  all  possible  responses  to  the  issue  in  question,  with  the  various 
responses aggregated according to their frequencies. 
9.2.5
 
Quality control 
Interviewers  were  instructed  to  check  questionnaire  completeness  and  accuracy  at 
the  interview  site.  At  the  end  of  each  day,  questionnaire  debriefing  sessions  were 
held between the supervisor and all interviewers, to identify any complications, and 
to  agree  on  common  definitions.  Interviewers  were  asked  to  write  down  all 
additional  qualitative  information,  which  was  analyzed  by  the  team.  This  was 
important  in  capturing  important  data  that  would  have  otherwise  been  left  out  by 
the restrictive design of the research instruments. 
The following section summarizes the results of the surveys: Section 9.3.1 focuses on 
the household structure and village infrastructure, section 9.3.2 gives results for the 
use of the forest by people and section 9.3.3 summarizes people’s attitudes towards 
the  creation  of  a  protected  area.  The  last  section  pools  all  the  information  together 
and  proposes  how  a  protected  area  might  be  created  that  is  acceptable  to  most 
people living around this region. 

102 
 
 
 
Figure 47: Map of the study sites of the socioeconomic survey 

103 
 
9.3
 
Results 
9.3.1
 
Population, education and infrastructure 
Table 9 summarizes the demographic information of the eight study sites. The total 
population  within  the  eight  study  sites  is  1164  with  Nabalebale  village  being  the 
most  populated  at  431.  Located  along  the  Savusavu-Seaqaqa  highway,  Nabalebale 
village is part of Wailevu district in Cakaudrove and has easy access to the two main 
urban centers in the Northern Division, Labasa and Savusavu. Nasealevu village has 
the  lowest  population  of  84.  The  average  number  of  people  per  village  is  146.  The 
total  number  of  households  within  the  eight  study  sites  is  239,  with  the  highest  in 
Nabalebale  village  (55)  and  lowest  in  Nasealevu  (17).  The  average  number  of 
households per village is 30. 
Table 9: Summary of demographic information of the study sites 
Village name 
Number  of 
households 
Total 
population 
Age  of  oldest 
inhabitant 
Average  size  of 
a household 
Dogoru 
27 
165 
85 

Navakuru 
29 
120 
78 

Suweni 
37 
158 
74 

Nasealevu 
17 
84 
54 

Biaugunu 
27 
131 
75 

Nakawaga 
25 
127 
78 

Levuka 
22 
95 
67 

Nabalebale 
55 
284 
89 

Total (all study sites) 
239 
1164 
89 

The overall average number of people in a household in the study area is five, with 
all  villages  having  an  average  of  between  four  and  six  people  per  household.  This 
shows  that  the  majority  of  the  households  are  large,  implying  a  high  demand  for 
food and other household needs, which in turn implies increasing pressure on forest 
resources  to  satisfy  basic  needs.  For  households  already  involved  in  forest 

104 
 
utilization,  this  may  translate  into  further  forest  exploitation.  The  fact  that 
cultivation  is  the  major  economic  and  social  activity  for  the  majority  of  the 
communities adjacent to forested areas is confirmation that pressure on the natural 
resource base is high. 
The  age-sex  population  structure  of  the  study  area  (Figure  48),  shows  a 
predominantly  young  population,  with  the  largest  age  groups  being  5-9  and  10-14 
years old. The lowest age category (0-4 years old) is smaller than those immediately 
above  it,  which  implies  a  decline  in  birth  rate  in  the  eight  villages  in  recent  years. 
The  pyramid  also  clearly  shows  that  women  in  the  eight  villages  live  longer  than 
men.  Women  are  however  fewer  in  number,  comprising  only  46%  of  the  sampled 
population.  The  median  age  of  the  sampled  population  is  25,  closely  matching  the 
national average of 24.6 years. 
 
Figure 48: Population breakdown by gender and age group 
Almost  half  (48%)  of  household  heads  were  educated  up  to  primary  school  level. 
About  41%  were  educated  above  secondary  level  while  only  9%  had  no  formal 
education  at  all.  Around  4%  had  attained  some  tertiary  education.  Similarly,  the 
respondents were mainly primary level-educated people (50%), 42% had secondary 
education and above while only around 8% had no formal education at all. Formal 
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
20
40
60
80
100
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
45-39
40-44
35-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80-84
85+
Female
Male

105 
 
education in Fiji usually begins at the age of five (kindergarten or pre-school). 10% of 
the population fall below this age group. The remaining 90% of the population are 
either still undertaking or have obtained primary education (38%), still undertaking 
or  have  obtained  secondary  education  (23%),  still  undertaking  or  have  obtained 
tertiary education (10%), or have never had any education (9%). 
Across the eight study  sites, the average year of education  is 8.3 years. The overall 
educational attainment of household members in the sites is high in comparison to 
the national average and this can be largely attributed to the easy accessibility of the 
schools,  as  well  as  being  close  to  the  Northern  Division  education  offices  so  that 
school  management  bodies  more  easily  access  infrastructural  development 
assistance for the improvement of school facilities. 
In  terms  of  educational  infrastructure,  each  village  has  access  to  a  nearby  primary 
school  (Table  10)  which  is  either  owned  by  the  village  or  by  the  district  that  the 
village  is  a  part  of.  Suweni,  Navakuru  and  Dogoru villages  have  access  to  a  wider 
range of primary schools within the greater Labasa area and also have regular public 
transport services to transport students to and from these schools. The schools in the 
other five villages are all accessible by foot. The average distance from the village to 
the primary school for these villages is 2.8 km, with Nasealevu village to Vudibasoga 
Catholic  School  being  the  furthest  distance  that  children  travel  to  attend  primary 
school (3.6 km). 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə