Fiji Islands 2014 Rapid Biodiversity Assessment, Socioeconomic Study and Archaeological Survey of the Greater Delaikoro Area



Yüklə 6.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü6.96 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17

Table 10: Community primary school information 
Village 
name 
Primary School 
Level 
Distance from village (km) 
Dogoru 
Various  schools  within  wider 
Labasa area 
Class 8 
varies depending on school 
Suweni 
Wairiki District School 
Class 8 
1.1 
Navakuru 
Wairiki District School 
Class 8 
1.6 
Nasealevu 
Vudibasoga Catholic School 
Class 8 
3.6 
Levuka 
Nabalebale Primary School 
Class 8 
1.8 

106 
 
Nabalebale 
Nabalebale Primary School 
Class 8 
next to village boundary 
Biaugunu 
Nukubolu Primary School 
Class 8 
next to village boundary 
Nakawaga 
Nukubolu Primary School 
Class 8 
1.3 
Most  (44%)  of  the  houses  in  the  eight  study  sites  have  houses  with  wooden  walls, 
while 38% and 18% have corrugated iron walls or brick/cement walls, respectively (). 
All the houses in the eight study sites have corrugated iron roofs. 
 
Figure 49: House wall materials of households surveyed 
Half of all households have a flush toilet, while 38% have a water seal toilet. A small 
proportion of the households have pit toilet (5%), while the remaining 7% stated that 
they do not have a proper toilet facility (Figure 50). 
 
Figure 50: Toilet type in households surveyed 
Series1, 
Corrugated, 
38, 38% 
Series1, 
Wood, 44, 
44% 
Series1, 
Brick/cemen
t, 18, 18% 
Corrugated
Wood
Brick/cement
7% 
5% 
38% 
50% 
No toilet
Pit toilet
Water seal
Flush

107 
 
Table  11  summarizes  communally  owned  infrastructure  present  in  the  villages 
surveyed, as well as the importance of these key village buildings as mentioned by 
the respondents. 
Table 11: Village infrastructure  
Infrastructure 
Purpose according to respondents 
Village  
Village hall 

 
Place  for  hosting  village  events  such  as  wedding,, 
traditional ceremonies and other key occasions 

 
Village Council meeting place 

 
Traditional  Council  meetings  such  as  Bose  Vanua  are 
also conducted in village halls 

 
For village social gathering such as kava session in the 
evening  after  completion  of  a  communal  task  or  at 
times for casual social gatherings. 

 
A  key  physical  asset  in  promoting  social  cohesion 
within a community 

 
In  some  of  the  villages,  a  section  of  the  village  hall  is 
usually closed off for storage of key 
All 
eight 
villages 
Village 
dispensary  

 
This  facility  is  important  of  the  storage  of  medical 
supplies  

 
The  village  nurse  perform  basic  medical  procedures 
such as treating the common skin illness, cleaning and 
dressing  wounds,  supply    basic  medicine  such  as 
paracetamol tablets. 

 
The  facility  usually  has  a  bed  whereby  a  patient  can 
rest  while  the  full  medical  assistance  in  terms  of 
ambulance evacuation arrives. 
Nabalebale, 
Nakawaga, 
Biaugunu, 
Suweni, 
Dogoru 
Church 

 
For  religious  gathering  and  venue  for  meetings  of  the 
various  religious  institutions  such  as  the  Christian 
Youth Group and monthly meetings 

 
Place where the blessing of wedding takes place 

 
Also,  the  structure  itself  is  a  physical  asset  in 
maintaining communal cohesion  
All 
eight 
villages 
Pastor’s house 

 
Where the village religious leader resides 

 
The  house  is  constructed  by  the  village  that  host  the 
religious leader 
Suweni, 
Nabalebale, 
Nakawaga 

108 
 
Five  of  the  villages  (Dogoru,  Biaugunu,  Nawaqaga,  Levuka,  Nabalebale)  are 
connected  to  the  main  FEA  supply.  Within  these  villages  all  households  are  now 
connected  to  the  main  supply.  Prior  to  this  connection  being  made,  these  villages 
relied on a village generator or kerosene lantern for light.  
The other three villages (Nasealevu, Navakuru and Suweni) each own and rely on a 
communal village generator and all households are connected to this generator. The 
village  generators  are  run  normally  between  the  hours  of  7  pm  and  10  pm.  Each 
household  makes  a  contribution  to  the  central  fund  for  purchasing  fuel  and 
maintenance of the generator; typically this contribution is in the region of FJD5-15 
per month. The operation and maintenance of the generator is the responsibility of 
the  village  development  committee.  It  is  common  for  village  generators  to  be 
inoperative for extended periods of time. 
All villages have a communal water catchment which is often a concreted section of 
a  naturally  occurring  creek  which  has  at  its  base  a  small  dam.  Pipes  run  from  this 
dam into a single centralised storage water tank or straight to the village and water 
is  either  reticulated  to  individual  households  through  PVC  pipes  or  terminates  in 
one or more communal standpipes which are shared by multiple households. There 
is no form of metering system in any of the villages. 
On average 74% of all households surveyed noted that their water supply sometimes 
runs out; either from a lack of water or insufficient water pressure necessary for it to 
reach their houses. During such times all households rely on the various creeks that 
run close to the village for their main water supply. These creeks are sourced from 
Greater  Delaikoro  Area,  therefore,  the  area  of  focus  is  also  very  important  in 
supplying water to nearby communities and natural resources.  
The  Water  Authority  of  Fiji  has  responsibility  for  the  installation  of  water 
infrastructure and major works. Day-to-day maintenance of the system is commonly 
done  by  community  members;  in  each  village  there  is  typically  one  or  more 
individuals skilled in basic plumbing work. Piped water is mostly used for drinking, 

109 
 
cooking and, to a lesser extent, washing. Frequent use is made of the rivers that run 
through  the  area  for washing  both  clothes  and  for  personal  washing.  Amongst  the 
younger  age  groups  the  rivers  also  form  an  important  recreational  facility;  with 
children frequently play around and in the rivers when not at school. 
9.3.2
 
Household income and resource dependency 
As shown in Figure 51, the main income source in the study area is from the sale of 
yaqona,  which  is  the  main  income  source  for  44%  of  the  total  households.  This  is 
followed  by  the  farming  and  selling  of  other  cash  crops  (14%  of  households).  The 
sale  of  vegetables,  non-timber  forest  product  such  as  wild  pig,  wild  ferns  and 
freshwater fish are also important income sources for these communities.  
12%  of  households  state  that  their  main  source  of  income  is  from  formal 
employment  in  urban  centers.  The  majority  of  these  households  are  from  Suweni, 
Navakuru, Dogoru, Nabalebale and Nakawaga villages, all of which have access to 
the public road as well as daily public transportation services. The other villages also 
have access to the public road, but not to reliable public transport. 
 
Figure 51: Main income source of households surveyed 
44 
14 



12 




0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
Per
ce
n
tage 
o
f h
o
u
seh
o
ld
 

110 
 
In  terms  of  income  value,  the  average  household  monthly  income  is  $719.  The 
highest income as highlighted in  Figure 52 is gained from yaqona at $387 followed 
by selling of cash crops at $156. The third highest income comes from employment at 
$56  followed  by  selling  vegetables  and  non-timber  forest  products  at  $54  and  $31, 
respectively. 
 
Figure 52: Average household income with income source 
The focus groups were asked to list the top three resources that are not farmed but 
are  very  important  for  their  livelihood.  Fuelwood  (from  trees),  wild  pigs  and 
freshwater  resources  were  the  three  most  commonly  cited.  The  discussions  also 
highlighted that these resources are mainly harvested within the Greater Delaikoro 
Area. 
From this result, it can be noted that the forest and farming area within the Greater 
Delaikoro Area plays an important role in the economic activities and livelihood of 
the eight study sites. The majority of income gained is from farming and collection of 
non-timber forest products within the Greater Delaikoro Area. Therefore, it is clear 
from these summaries that the majority of the population in the study sites relies on 
387 
156 
54 
31 

56 
15 



0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
$/m
o
n
th
 
Income source 

111 
 
the  natural  resources  within  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area  for  their  livelihood  and 
everyday survival. 
Crops and livestock 
In  addition  to  the  economic  importance  of  crops  and  livestock  discussed  in  the 
previous section, crops and livestock play an important role in the daily life of eight 
communities. Across all villages 91% of households stated that they eat food grown 
by household members either at every meal (21%) or daily (70%).  
 
Figure 53: Percentage of households with frequency of consumption (grown food) 
Households  were  asked  to  rank  the  frequency  with  which  they  consume  specific 
foods grown by household members (1= at every meal, 2= daily, 3= every other day, 
4= weekly and 5= less often). These results are shown in Figure 53. The main types of 
home-grown  foods  consumed  by  households  are  rourou  (average  rank  2),  dalo 
(average rank of 2.1), cassava (average rank of 2.7) and bele (3.7). Additional foods 
grown  that  are  consumed  less  frequently  include  plantain,  bananas,  sweet  potato, 
yams and cabbage. 
Cows  and  pigs  are  infrequently  eaten  by  individual  households;  instead  they  are 
supplied  either  for  large  village  functions  or  for  sale  to  generate  income.  Poultry 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80

of
 h
ou
sehol
d
 
Study sites 
At every meal
Daily
A few days a week
Weekly

112 
 
typically run free-range within the village surroundings and provide eggs and meat 
to individual households. 
Given the importance of subsistence land use and growing root crops in particular, it 
is  not  surprising  that  the  rate  of  ownership  of  agricultural  tools  and  assets  is 
ubiquitously  high  across  all  villages  (Figure  54).  Every  single  household  across  all 
villages  own  one  or  more  cane  knives  used  in  planting  and  tending  crops.  On 
average, 73% of households across all villages own one or more spring spade, spade 
or fork. 
 
Figure 54: Percentage of households with farming assets 
Hunting and fishing 
Wild pigs are hunted throughout the extensive tracts of the forest within the Greater 
Delaikoro  Area.  During  large village  gathering,  group  of young  men  in  the  village 
are always tasked to hunt wild pigs for eating. There is a pig hunting season around 
the  Christmas  and  New  Year  period  and  at  Easter  as  a  means  of  supplementing 
protein due to increased visitor numbers. 
The  local  freshwater  fishery  for  food  security  and  subsistence  purposes  is  very 
important in all these communities. The frequency with which households consume 
0
20
40
60
80
100
120

of
 h
ou
sehol
d
 
Study sites 
Knife
Spring spade
Spade
Fork
Axe
Chemical sprayer
Bullocks

113 
 
fish and prawns caught by household members was recorded (1 = at every meal, 2 = 
daily, 3 = every other day, 4 = weekly and 5 = less often). On average, fish were eaten 
slightly  less  often  than  weekly  (average  rating  4.2)  whilst  prawns  were  even  less 
frequently than that (4.6). 
Fisheries  are  known  to  be  seasonal.  The  main  targeted  fisheries  products  of  eels 
(mainly  Anguila  marmorata),  tilapia  (mainly  Oreochromis  niloticus),  grass  carp 
(Ctenopharyngodon  idellus)  and  prawns  are  targeted  in  the  months  of  August  and 
September and again around Christmas and into the early New Year. During these 
times,  fisheries  products  are  consumed  on  average  at  least  weekly.  The  most 
commonly  owned  fishing  equipment  are  hook  and  line  which  owned  by  72%  of 
households, spears (66%) and mask and snorkel (57%). 
Gathering 
Food  gathered  from  the  forest  in  the  vicinity  of  the  villages  includes  ferns  (mainly 
Diplazium  esculentum  or  ota),  Tahitian  chestnut  (Inocarpus  fagifer  or  ivi)  and  wild 
yams (Dioscorea sp.).  
Non-timber  forest  products  are  consumed  less  often  than  weekly  (33%  of 
households)  or  a  few  days  a  week  (26%  of  households).  Only  a  few  households 
consume  them  more  often.  The  most  commonly  eaten  resource  is  ota  which  is 
consumed on average across all households every other day. It is worthy of note that 
rourou  is  more  commonly  used  for  home  consumption  than  ota,  ota  being  more 
commonly sold. 
The fruit of the ivi tree is a seasonal non-timber forest product that is consumed on 
average  every  other  day  during  the  season  which  runs  from  January-March.  Wild 
yams are collected during November-January and are consumed weekly on average 
across all villages. 

114 
 
Other uses of the Greater Delaikoro Area  
Most households in the study area (93%) used the Greater Delaikoro Area to obtain 
forest  products.  The  majority  of  timber  used  to  construct  houses  in  these 
communities  is  cut  from  trees  within  the  region.  Quantifying  the  volume  of  trees 
chopped  down  for  this  purpose  is  hard  given  that  it  is  usually  done  on  an  ad  hoc 
basis,  generally  when  a  couple  have  got  married  and  need  a  new  house  or  when 
house  repairs  are  needed.  Other  uses  of  forest  products  mentioned  by  the 
respondents include herbal medicine, carving, fence posts, thatching reed, collection 
of firewood and clearing of forest areas for farming. 
9.3.3
 
Forest Resource Management 
Respondents  were  asked  for  their  opinion  on  they  thought  had  the  authority  to 
develop and manage the forest. 75% felt that they have full jurisdiction through the 
mataqali  tribal  council,  whilst  15%  thought  that  mataqali  chiefs  have  the  sole 
jurisdiction.  5%  thought  that  they  together  with  the  government  have  the  power 
while the remaining 5% thought that the government had sole authority. Some of the 
government  departments  and  affiliates  that  respondents  mentioned  as  having 
shared  authority  with  them  over  forest  areas  include  the  Forestry  Department,  the 
Environment Department, the Land Department and the iTaukei Land Trust Board. 
Value attachment to Greater Delaikoro Area 
The survey revealed that communities derive a number of benefits from the Greater 
Delaikoro  Area,  which  they  say  contribute  enormously  to  their  livelihoods.  Asked 
for their opinions  on whether or not the Greater Delaikoro Area in their respective 
localities  should  be  maintained  under  its  current  land  use,  99%  answered  in  the 
affirmative.  However,  the  appreciation  seemed  to  be  largely  limited  to  tangible 
benefits derived from the area. Only 11.9% of the respondents were able to articulate 
some  intrinsic  values  of  the  area.  The  inability  to  adequately  comprehend  Greater 
Delaikoro  Area  values  in  totality  highlights  a  gap  in  the  awareness  level  of  these 
communities on the importance of this area. Some of the main values mentioned by 

115 
 
the  respondents  included  water  source  for  domestic  use,  land  for  cultivation,  fish, 
building materials, hunting, crafts  materials, wild fruits, herbal medicine, firewood 
and ownership and sense of belonging. 
Interventions to ensure sustainability of the Greater Delaikoro Area 
Respondents  were  asked  what  needs  to  be  done  to  ensure  sustainable  resource 
utilisation.  The  majority  of  the  respondents  (35%)  listed  the  need  to  intensify 
sensitization on sustainable resource use as very important, followed by the need to 
enforce environmental, water and forest laws and enact by-laws at community level 
(28.3%).  Also  important  was  the  need  to  clearly  demarcate  areas  of  biological 
importance (26.3%). People also identified the need for planning at the local level, to 
draft  village  resource  management  plans.  Other  suggestions  hinged  on  training  in 
improved  natural  resource  management  (forest  and  soil  conservation),  and 
interventions  that  would  reduce  community  threats  such  as  tree  planting  and 
banning bush fires. 
Respondents were asked whether, according to them, there are any aspects in which 
their  communities  needed  to  be  trained  in  order  to  improve  protection  of  Greater 
Delaikoro  Area  and  the  resources  therein.  Virtually  everybody  (99%)  answered  in 
the  affirmative.  Training  needs  cited  included  awareness  on  forest  use  and 
importance  and  sustainable  agricultural  practices.  Most  of  the  other  training  needs 
mentioned  were  to  do  with  improving  resource  management  (such  as  farming 
methods  within  the  area,  beekeeping,  livestock  management,  craft  making)  and 
training in options to reduce direct dependency on the Greater Delaikoro Area (such 
as alternative income generating projects and fuel saving technologies). 
Factors affecting surveyed communities 
The  analysis  of  community  social  interactions  and  economic  lifestyles  pointed  to  a 
number  of  factors  with  a  bearing  on  their  socioeconomic  wellbeing.  Whereas  the 
Greater Delaikoro Area is looked at as a source of livelihood, community  needs are 

116 
 
not  met  adequately.  The  survey  also  generated  information  to  the  effect  that  the 
current practices are not sustainable, and there is evidence of  shrinking forest size, 
and a reduction in associated community and individual benefits. 
There  is  a  general  lack  of  awareness  among  the  population  of  the  adverse 
consequences of their actions on the Greater Delaikoro Area. Communities here are 
generally  agro-based,  and  look  at  this  region  as  a  means  towards  achieving  high 
production levels. There is little thought given to the survival of the region and its 
ability  to  adequately  meet  future  needs.  It  is  therefore  not  surprising  that  when 
asked  about  the  importance  of  the  Greater  Delaikoro  Area,  respondents  mainly 
thought of tangible benefits until probed to think about other ecological aspects. 
The  sites  visited  exhibited  a  lack  of  trained  and  committed  personnel  in  terrestrial 
resources management at community level. The only service provider in this region 
is the Fiji Forestry Department in Labasa town and the Forestry Department Station 
in Korotari. There is inadequate and/or weak institutional coordination and links on 
environment management in general and natural resource management in particular 
in this region. 
The  other  notable  factor  concerns  the  selfish  nature  of  community  members  that 
prevents  them  from  looking  at  a  community  as  a  whole  but  rather  themselves  as 
individuals.  During  the  discussions,  it  emerged  that  respondents  did  not  attach 
much value to the benefits that accrue to the community, singling out only benefits 
that  come  to  them  in  their  individual  capacities.  Such  an  attitude  is  challenging  to 
programme  design  in  terms  of  how  interventions  are  framed  to  meet  the  needs  of 
their target beneficiaries in an environmentally friendly manner. 
Overdependence  on  agriculture  and  an  apparent  minimal  diversification  of 
livelihoods  is  a  limiting  factor  to  the  sustainability  of  this  region.  Most  people  are 
entirely dependent on yaqona and cash crop cultivation. Most of these crops require 
very fertile soil, therefore, communities tend to expand into pristine forest after only 
a  few  years  of  planting  in  a  particular  area.  The  relocation  to  these  pristine  areas 

117 
 
means  the  cutting  down  and  destruction  of  forest  coupled  with  the  disturbance  of 
the soil structure. 
Community attitudes towards conservation and the idea of a protected area 
Community  attitudes  and  views  of  their  natural  resource  are  very  important  for 
resource  developers  and  managers  because  the  success  of  any  development  or 
conservation project mainly depends on how people value their resources. In order 
to capture this, a few statements were read out to respondents during the interview. 
These  statements  point  out  to  some  important  components  regarding  the  future 
management of the Greater Delaikoro  Area. The results shown in  Table 12 confirm 
that  the  majority  of  the  respondents  do  value  their  resources  and  see  the  need  for 
resource management. 
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə