Flora and dynamics of an upland and a floodplain forest in Peña



Yüklə 2.63 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/14
tarix01.08.2017
ölçüsü2.63 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14

 
 
 
 
Flora and dynamics of an upland 
and a floodplain forest in Peña 
Roja, Colombian Amazonia 
 
Flora y dinámica de bosques de 
tierra firme y de várzea en Peña 
Roja, Amazonia colombiana 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Londoño, AC 2011 Flora and dynamics of an upland and a floodplain 
forest in Peña Roja, Colombian Amazonia. 
 
PhD dissertation, Universiteit van Amsterdam. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The work presented in this Thesis was mainly funded by Tropenbos - 
Colombia, the Netherlands Organisation for International Cooperation in 
Higher Education (NUFFIC) and COLCIENCIAS. Research was 
conducted at the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics 
(IBED), Universiteit van Amsterdam.  
ISBN: 978-90-76894-97-3 
Lay-out: Ana Catalina Londoño Vega. 
Cover: Canopy of the upland plot (left); young leaves of Pseudomonotes 
tropenbosii (centre); canopy of the floodplain plot (right). 
No part of this dissertation may be reproduced in any format, by print, 
photocopy, microfilm or by any other means without the written 
permission from the author. 

 
 
Flora and dynamics of an upland and a floodplain 
forest in Peña Roja, Colombian Amazonia
 
 
Flora y dinámica de bosques de tierra firme y de 
várzea en Peña Roja, Amazonia colombiana 
 
 
 
 
 
ACADEMISCH PROEFSCHRIFT 
 
ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor 
aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam 
op gezag van de Rector Magnificus 
prof. dr. D.C. van den Boom 
ten overstaan van een door het college voor promoties 
ingestelde commissie, in het openbaar te verdedigen 
in de Agnietenkapel op 
dinsdag 21 juni 2011, te 14.00 uur 
 
 
door 
 
 
Ana Catalina Londoño Vega 
geboren te Medellín, Colombia 

 
 
Promotiecommissie 
 
Promotores: 
 
Prof. dr. A.M. Cleef 
 
 
 
Prof. dr. H. Hooghiemstra 
Co-promotor:   
Dr. J.F. Duivenvoorden 
 
Overige leden:   
Prof. dr. P. Baas 
 
 
 
Prof. dr. P.J.M. Maas 
 
 
 
Prof. dr. R.G.A. Boot 
 
 
 
Prof. dr. J.H.D. Wolf 
 
 
 
Dr. ir. H.F.M. Vester 
 
 
 
Faculteit der Natuurwetenschappen, Wiskunde en Informatica 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A mi Padre 
A mi Esposo 
 
 
 
Sólo lo que cambia, permanece 
Heráclito 
 

 
 

 
 
Contents 
 
1.  Introduction 

2.  Site description of the upland and floodplain plots 
17 
3.  A new genus and species of Dipterocarpaceae from  
the Neotropics.  
I. Introduction, taxonomy, ecology, and distribution 
31 
4.  Arquitectura de Iryanthera tricornisOsteophloeum  
platyspermum y Virola pavonis (Myristicaceae) 
49 
5.  Composición florística de dos bosques (tierra firme y várzea)  
en la región de Araracuara, Amazonia colombiana 
85 
6.  Forest dynamics of an upland and a floodplain plot  
near Peña Roja, Colombian Amazonia 
111 
7.  Synthesis 
141 
 
Literature 
149 
 
Summary, Resumen, Samenvatting 
179 
 
Appendices 
191 
 
Agradecimientos 
235 
 
Curriculum vitae 
239 

 
 

 

Introduction
 
Ana Catalina Londoño Vega 

 
10 
1.1 
The importance of Amazonian forests 
The Amazon Basin, which encompasses the catchments of the Amazon 
River and the rivers of the Guiana Shield that drain into the Atlantic 
Ocean, and a substantial part of the basin of Orinoco River, is covered by 
the largest continuous area of tropical forests in the world. Amazonian 
forests represent the habitat for about one-tenth of all species of the world. 
As such, the Amazon Basin has a fundamental role in the origin and 
conservation of genetic resources worldwide. However, Amazonian 
forests, just as most of the tropical forests in Africa and Asia, are severely 
threatened by mankind. Deforestation rates of humid tropical forests vary 
around 142,000 km
2
 per year (FAO 2001; Achard et al. 2002; Fearnside 
and Laurance 2003). In the past two decades increasing attention has been 
paid to the important role of the Amazon Basin in Global Change, 
especially regarding climate change, the cycling of water and carbon, and 
the emission of greenhouse gasses (Junk and Furch 1985; Phillips et al. 
1998; Canadell et al. 2000; Watson et al. 2000; Holmgren et al. 2001; 
Houghton et al. 2001; Clark et al. 2003; Malhi and Phillips 2004). Changes 
in atmospheric CO
2
 concentrations probably influence the composition, 
diversity and dynamics of the forests (Clark et al. 2003; Laurance et al. 
2004). It is in this context that studies about the biomass and carbon 
fixation of tropical forests are being intensified in recent years (Brown 
1997; Silver et al. 2000; Brown 2002). Most of these studies depend on 
measurements of forest productivity in permanent plots, which is often 
estimated on the basis of yearly tree growth by diameter increments and 
tree mortality. 
1.2 
Permanent plots to study long-term forest dynamics  
The adequate conservation of tropical forests and wise use of their natural 
resources depend to a large extent on our knowledge of the variation in 
these forests, both in space and in time. Long-term studies in permanent 
forest plots consisting of repeated surveys in well-demarcated and geo-
referenced plots, allow the quantification of the temporal variation of 
forest resources (Campbell et al. 2002). Non-permanent plots to describe 
Amazonian forests along environmental gradients have been used 
successfully in exploratory surveys (Gentry 1988b; Duivenvoorden and 

 
11 
Lips 1993; ter Steege et al. 2003; Duque 2004; Benavides 2010). Yet, such 
plots have the disadvantage that they, similar to a photograph, only 
provide a limited view at a certain time. In contrast, permanent plots not 
only admit a detailed description of the habitat at a particular site, but also 
allow detecting temporal changes in the forest. Such information is 
indispensable to predict future changes in the diversity and distribution of 
species (Losos and Leigh 2004). Beyond the initial inventory of the 
vegetation in permanent plots it is necessary to measure forest changes in 
the long run, through continuous monitoring of the floristic composition, 
structure, growth, mortality and survival of species, preferably at more 
than one site (Comiskey et al. 1999). 
Permanent plots have been used extensively to study long-term changes of 
vegetation and the natural processes that allow the coexistence of species 
in relation to the environment (Bakker et al. 1996; Herben 1996; Rees et 
al. 2001; Hubbell 2004). Early studies conducted in tropical forests 
primarily aimed at measuring the diameter growth for silvicultural 
management and timber harvesting (Bell 1971). Recent studies include 
other objectives such as quantifying carbon stocks and their relation to 
global flows (Dallmeier 1992; Phillips et al. 1998; Orrego et al. 2003). The 
oldest plots in tropical forests stem from the first part of the twentieth 
century, and were established in Philippine dipterocarp forests (Richards 
1952), on the islands of Trinidad and Tobago (Bell 1971), in Peninsular 
Malaysia (Manokaran and Swaine 1994) and in Uganda, Africa (Sheil et 
al. 2000). The largest plots (25 to 50 ha) are now part of the CTFS network 
(Center for Tropical Forest Science) of the Smithsonian Tropical Research 
Institute (STRI) (Losos and Leigh 2004), which manages, for example, the 
well-known plot on Barro Colorado Island (Panama). Another network is 
that by the Amazon Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR) (Malhi et al. 
2002; Malhi and Phillips 2004), which mostly supports 1-ha plots.  
In Colombia, permanent forest plots were initially installed to monitor 
growth of timber species like Cupressus lusitanica (Tschinkel 1972; del 
Valle 1979), Cordia alliodoraTectona grandisEucalyptus saligna, and 
Cariniana pyriformis. In the 1980's permanent forest plots were started in 
the Chocó region (western Colombia) (González et al. 1991; González 
1995; del Valle 1996a, 1998ab, 1999) and Amazonia (Londoño 1993, this 
dissertation). In 2000 about 70 permanent plots were being maintained 

 
12 
(Vallejo et al. 2005; Álvarez et al. 2008). By mid 2006, these plots covered 
at least 100 ha. Overall, the two plots described in this dissertation have 
particular significance as they are among the oldest permanent forest plots 
in Colombian Amazonia, and in Colombia as a whole. 
1.3 
Floristic and ecological research in the permanent forest plots at 
Peña Roja 
Between 1986 and 2000 the Tropenbos-Colombia Programme supported 
forest ecological research in the mid catchment of the Caquetá River, with 
its epicenter in Araracuara (Fig. 1-1). The programme started with a land 
unit survey of a large area (10,000 km
2
), east of Araracuara. Based on the 
ecological maps (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995) in late 1988 
several sites were selected as representative for the principal land units, in 
order to develop long-term monitoring studies of forest ecosystem 
functioning. The following selection criteria were applied: a) 
Representation: the land unit should have a wide cover in the Middle 
Caquetá area and in the Colombian Amazon as a whole, b) Accessibility: 
the site should be well accessible by river from Araracuara to allow 
efficient transport of personnel and equipment, c) Control, surveillance 
and security: sites should offer some protection for permanently installed 
research equipment (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1990). The sites selected 
were located in the area of Nonuya community of Peña Roja. One site 
belonged to the land unit classified as Tertiary Sedimentary Plain and the 
other site was located on a rarely inundated flood plain of the Caquetá 
River (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1990). With all parties involved it was 
agreed to develop a long-term research on the flora, structure and 
dynamics of the forest vegetation at these two monitoring sites. At each 
site a permanent plot of 1.8 ha was established for the long-term study of 
the forest. Uniform criteria were used for the establishment, i.e. the sites 
were chosen in such a way that very large (multiple tree gaps by wind 
throw) canopy gaps were avoided. Also, the physiography, forest 
(Duivenvoorden et al. 1988) and soils were as homogeneous as possible. 
From that moment on, in and outside these plots, a series of ecological 
studies have been successfully carried out by students from Colombia and 
other nationalities, for example those regarding plant-animal relationships 

 
13 
(van Dulmen 2001; Parrado 2005), hydrology (Téllez 2003) and nutrient 
cycling (Tobón 1999; Tobón et al. 2004ab).  
 
Fig. 1-1. Location of Araracuara in Colombian Amazonia. The shaded area 
around Araracuara and Peña Roja is given in more detail in Fig. 2-1. 
There is no doubt that the activities of Tropenbos-Colombia triggered the 
intensification of the botanical explorations in Colombian Amazonia. In 
spite of considerable progress in the past years (Sánchez 1997; Rudas and 
Prieto 2005) it is still common that about one fifth of the species 
encountered in Amazonian forest surveys remains unidentified. Also, most 
identifications rely on sterile specimens. Therefore, the contribution of 
taxonomy to describe and categorize the species diversity of Amazonian 
forests is of utmost importance. Obtaining fertile botanical specimens of 
tree species is a challenge in tropical forests, because many species are 
sterile during a large part of the year. More importantly, many tree species 
are hard to encounter during botanical surveys because of their scattered 
occurrence in small populations. In this regard, the discovery of a new 
species of the family of Dipterocarpaceae, in one of the permanent plots 
established in the Peña Roja community was an extraordinary event. 
Before this discovery, the family of Dipterocarpaceae, which belongs to 

 
14 
one of the most dominant, species rich, and economically important tree 
families in tropical forests of Asia (Whitmore 1975; Ashton 1982), was 
only represented by one single species in the Neotropics (Pakaraimaea 
dipterocarpacea Maguire & Ashton recorded in Guyana). The record of 
Pseudomonotes tropenbosii Londoño, Álvarez and Forero in the upland 
plot near Peña Roja along the Caquetá river emphasizes the 
phytogeographical links of Colombian Amazonia with the Guiana Shield 
region (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995) and even with Africa and 
Madagascar (via the subfamily Monotoideae; Morton 1995), and 
underscores the unique position and value of this permanent plot. 
The architecture of a plant is the morphological expression of its genome 
in a given time, and a result of the balance between endogenous growth 
processes and exogenous constraints exerted by the environment 
(Barthélémy et al. 1991; Hallé 1995). The objective of architectural 
analysis is to identify the endogenous processes that control growth and 
shape of the whole plant, by means of observation. Three key concepts 
have been developed: the architectural model (Hallé and Oldeman 1970), 
the architectural unit (Édelin 1977) and the reiteration (Oldeman 1974). 
The concepts of model and reiteration unit have provided a valuable tool 
for studying the structure and form of plants. Plant architecture further 
determines how resources are allocated in plants, for example, regarding 
the capture of light, water transport, mechanical stability, and resistance to 
wind (Vester 1997; Poorter and Werger 1999). Vester (1997) analyzed 
successive architectural development of tree taxa in successional forests 
near Araracuara. He showed that on the basis of detailed observations, 
architectural analysis yields understanding of the mechanisms of 
succession in secondary forest or in old-growth forests. Architectural 
analysis thus has the potential to supply significant information regarding 
forest dynamics in permanent plots, to complement the demographic 
information of recruitment, growth and mortality.  
Arguably, two principal results emerged from the ecological surveys of the 
Middle Caquetá area (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995; Urrego 1997; 
Quiñones 2002; Duque 2004; Sánchez 2005; Benavides 2010). The first 
was the clear recognition of the high tree species diversity per unit of area 
(Valencia et al. 1994; Duivenvoorden 1996), which ranks among the 
highest level for tropical forests worldwide. Several explanations for the 

 
15 
high upper Amazonian tree species diversity have been put forward 
(Duivenvoorden 1995; ter Steege et al. 2006). In most of these, the unique 
properties of the geological setting (speciation triggered by the unique 
configuration and the highly dynamic environment in the Tertiary; Hoorn 
and Wesselingh 2010) and the climatic history of northwestern Amazonia 
(continuous high humidity throughout the Pleistocene favouring species 
survival; Lips and Duivenvoorden 1994; Mayle et al. 2004) play a key 
role. The second result was the evidence and documentation that forest 
composition and forest diversity systematically changed across land units, 
which differed regarding flooding, drainage and soil nutrient 
concentrations. High levels of forest diversity were consistently recorded 
in the well-drained uplands (Duivenvoorden 1996; Duivenvoorden and 
Duque 2010). On the other hand, poor drainage, seasonal flooding and 
extremely low levels of soil nutrient availability were always associated 
with low levels of tree species diversity (Urrego 1997; Duivenvoorden and 
Duque 2010). Furthermore, litterfall measurements in combination with 
studies of the standing stock of litter on the forest floor indicated that the 
aboveground decomposition of organic matter (a proxy of net primary 
above-ground forest productivity; Vogt et al. 1998) was substantially 
higher in floodplains of the Caquetá than in well-drained uplands (Lips 
and Duivenvoorden 1996). Summarizing, in view of the physiographic 
setting of the two permanent forest plots at Peña Roja, a general picture 
emerged from the ecological survey that soil fertility, forest disturbances
and above-ground forest productivity in floodplains of the Caquetá River 
were higher than in the well-drained uplands. However, because these 
survey results were not based on permanent plots, information about forest 
dynamics could not be incorporated. In more recent studies in Amazonia at 
continental scales, forest dynamics have been correlated with forest 
diversity. Wide-scale correlations between tree mortality (Phillips et al. 
2004), wood specific gravity (Baker et al. 2004), above-ground biomass 
(Baker et al. 2004; Mahli et al. 2006), above-ground wood productivity 
(Malhi et al. 2006) and tree species diversity (ter Steege et al. 2006) have 
been reported along geological gradients from eastern Amazonia to upper 
Amazonian watersheds. In short, low diversity forests were associated to 
low levels of forest dynamics (low mortality, low productivity) and low 
levels of soil fertility, whereas high diversity forests showed a relatively 

 
16 
high mortality (and high wood productivity) and were found on relatively 
rich soils. Is this general scheme, obtained from Amazonia as a whole, 
useful to predict forest dynamics and forest diversity in a spatially more 
limited area like that of Colombian Amazonia?  
1.4 
Aims and outline of this dissertation 
The principal aim of this dissertation is to provide basic knowledge about 
the structure, species composition, and forest dynamics of two permanent 
forest plots established in contrasting land units (upland and floodplain), in 
the central part of Colombian Amazonia. In Chapter 2 a description of the 
two plot sites is given, including details of the plot design and set-up. This 
information serves as background to the next chapters, but is also essential 
to warrant a sound continuation of the monitoring activities in the coming 
decades. Chapter 3 reports on the discovery and description of the new 
genus and species of the family Dipterocarpaceae that appeared as one of 
the more dominant species in the upland plot. Chapter 4 gives a treatment 
of the architecture of three subcanopy species of the nutmeg family 
(Myristicaceae), a pantropical family of mostly tree species. It describes 
the development of these species from seedlings in the undergrowth to 
senile trees. The main purpose of this chapter was to evaluate the extra 
value of architectural analysis for studies regarding forest dynamics in 
permanent plots. The following two chapters give accounts on the species 
composition (Chapter 5) and forest dynamics (Chapter 6) in the two 
permanent plots. Which species, genera and families characterize these 
plots? How is the distribution of taxa among families and genera? What is 
the species composition relative to the habits or growth forms? How are 
the modes of death? Do mortality and recruitment differ between the 
plots? Do the patterns in tree species composition and forest dynamics in 
the plots correspond to predictions based on the general model of 
Amazonian forest diversity as function of geology? Finally, in Chapter 7 a 
synthesis is given, followed by the summaries in English, Spanish and 
Dutch and the appendices.  

 
 
 

Site description of the upland and 
floodplain plots 
Ana Catalina Londoño Vega 

 
18 
2.1 
Location and accessibility 
The permanent plots are located about 30 km east (and 70 km 
downstreams) of Araracuara (Fig. 2-1), in the basin of the Caquetá River, 
Colombian Amazonia. This area is part of the community of Peña Roja 
(Nonuya ethnicity), which is under the jurisdiction of the so-called 
Corregimiento de Puerto Santander, Departamento del Amazonas. The 
access to Araracuara from Bogotá is by air. Reaching the upland plot 
requires about 2 km walking from the maloca in Peña Roja. The floodplain 
plot can be reached by river, navigating upstream along the Caquetá river 
from the maloca in Peña Roja for about 2.5 km and then walking ca. 0.5 
km. 
2.2 
Climate 
The information about the current climate in the study area is based on two 
meteorological stations: one in Araracuara and one in Peña Roja. At 
Araracuara daily records were available from 1979-1990 (station code 
4413501 located at 160 m altitude above sea level; Duivenvoorden and 
Lips 1995). Climate data from Peña Roja were automatically recorded 
every 20 minutes between November 1992 and August 1997 (Tobón 1999) 
at a station located at 0°39' S and 72°5' W at 150 m above sea level, at 2.5 
km distance from the upland and floodplain plots. Disregarding slight 
differences between the records from both climate stations, which can be 
attributed to the different length of the registration period, the climate of 
this part of the Middle Caquetá Basin is characterized by an annual rainfall 
of ca. 3100 mm, an average yearly temperature of 25°C and a relative 
humidity of 87% (Fig. 2-2). This climate is classified as Afi, equatorial 
superhumid with no dry season (Köppen 1936), i.e. more than 60 mm 
rainfall in all months and a temperature difference of less than 5°C 
between the warmest and the coldest month. According to the life zone 
system of Holdridge (1982; Holdridge et al. 1971) the Middle Caquetá 
area is classified as humid tropical forest (bh-T). 

 
19 
 
Figure 2-1. Location of the two permanent plots (M1 = upland plot; M2 = floodplain plot) at Peña Roja, in the middle 
part of the Caquetá Basin, Colombian Amazonia. The map is derived from Duivenvoorden and Lips (1995). 

 
20 
 
Figure 2-2. Climate diagram of Araracuara, Colombian Amazonia. Taken 
from Duivenvoorden and Lips (1995). 
Both sources (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995; Tobón 1999) agree that the 
daily fluctuations in temperature are higher than the yearly fluctuations, 
and that the range of day and night temperatures is larger in the dry period 
than in the wet period. High temperatures occur in January and February 
and low temperatures in June. The latter are associated with a so-called 
"friaje" or "cold spell" which is a local phenomenon caused by the 
movement of cold air masses coming from the south of the continent 
through the Amazon Basin, and whose appearance has also been reported 
in Brazil (Salati 1985; Tobón 1999). The average monthly maximum 
temperature at Araracuara ranged from 29.5°C to 32.1°C and the average 
monthly minimum values from 21.2 °C to 22.6°C (Duivenvoorden and 
Lips 1995). At Peña Roja the maximum temperature rarely exceeded 35°C 
and the minimum did not fall below 19°C (Tobón 1999). 
Despite the similarity between the mean annual precipitation at Araracuara 
and Peña Roja, there were a few differences in the yearly distribution 
pattern. At Araracuara, the average annual rainfall was 3059 mm and 
showed a unimodal distribution with high values around May, and low 
values around January (Fig. 2-2; Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995). At Peña 
Roja the annual average rainfall was 3420 mm and showed a bimodal 
pattern with a slight decrease in June (Tobón 1999) and between 

 
21 
December and February. The wettest month was September not May, as in 
Araracuara.  
The distribution of rainfall through the year is determined by the trade 
winds (Domínguez 1987; Botero 1999). Although Araracuara belongs to 
the Southern Hemisphere its rainfall pattern is typical for that of the 
Northern Hemisphere, and is furthermore characterized by the absence of a 
pronounced dry season (Salati 1985). In Colombian Amazonia the pattern 
of rainfall is controlled by the north-south movement of the belt of 
intertropical convergence. Most of the rainfall occurs in the afternoon and 
evening (Tobón 1999; Téllez 2003). At Peña Roja, the wettest year was 
1994, and the driest year was 1995. On average it rained on 197 days per 
year, corresponding to 616 hours of rainfall per year (Tobón 1999; Téllez 
2003). 
2.3 
Hydrology 
Peña Roja is located in the catchment of the Caquetá River. This river 
originates in the Andes and, with a length of 2200 km, it is the largest river 
in Colombian Amazonia. It is a so-called white-water river, which implies 
that its water tends to have a whitish color due to suspended clay. The 
river water has a neutral pH (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993). The water 
level of the Caquetá River varies annually according to four seasons: low 
water, rising water, high water and falling water (Rodríguez 1999). The 
variation in river water level recorded at several stations along the river 
ranges from 6.5 m to 8.5 m, with peaks during July-August and low water 
levels between December-February (Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993; 
Urrego 1997). In addition to water levels associated to the annual flood 
cycles, occasionally (once every 3 to 11 years) the river water level rises to 
exceptional heights. The origin of this phenomenon is unknown, but it has 
been linked to global climate change, periods of large sunspot activity, or 
to the influence of El Niño events (van der Hammen and Cleef 1992; 
Botero 1999). 
The floodplain of the Caquetá River is called várzea (Prance 1980; Junk 
1984, 1990; Padoch et al. 1999). It is built up by fine sediments which are 
deposited during overflows (Eden et al. 1982; Hoorn 1990; 
Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995). Currently there is no evidence of 

 
22 
gravel transport. The Caquetá River is actively eroding sediments of its 
fluvial terraces, especially along its southern river bank (Eden et al. 1982).  
2.4 
Land units 
The upland plot (also denominated monitoring plot 1, or M1) is located on 
a land unit, which was classified as Tertiary Sedimentary Plain by 
Duivenvoorden and Lips (1993, 1995). This land unit covers between 85-
90% of the Colombian Amazon (PRORADAM 1979; Botero 1999). It can 
be seen as upland or "tierra firme" because it is never flooded by river 
water (Botero 1999; Duivenvoorden et al. 2001). Locally, uplands are also 
known as "monte firme" (Spanish) or "baj+hó (Muinane).  
The permanent plot is located along the upper slope of a valley (Fig. 2-3) 
developed in the Tertiary Sedimentary Plain along the left side 
(downstream) of the Caquetá River, opposite Sumaeta Island (Fig. 2-1), in 
the Peña Roja community. The plot coordinates are 0°39'31'' S, 72°4'38'' 
W. Its altitude is approximately 210 m above sea level. 
The soils in the upland plot were classified as Ultisols: Kanhapludults in 
stable positions and Paleudults in positions with more active erosion (SSS 
1987; Alarcón 1990). The soils are deep and show a ABtC profile. In some 
sectors gravelly sandy materials are found at the top, sometimes with 
abundant charcoal, which may well be a result of ancient human activity. 
Textures are sandy loam to clay in the upper horizons, sandy loamy clay in 
the middle part, and clay or sandy clay in the lower part of the pedon. A 
detailed soil profile description of a soil pit located just outside the 
permanent plot (20 m from the northwestern border) was presented by 
Duivenvoorden and Lips (1993, 1995; plot 125) and is in Appendix 1 
(profile 125). At this same location (plot 125) Lips and Duivenvoorden 
(1996) measured a yearly above-ground fine litter fall of 680 ± 54 g m
-2
 y
-1
 
(mean ± one SD) in 1989-1990. The Mean Residence Time of the organic 
material in the ectorganic horizons was 3.3 y (Duivenvoorden and Lips 
1995). 

 
23 
 
 
Figure 2-3. Detailed site map of the upland plot (Alarcón 1990; 
Tropenbos-Colombia 1990). A: relief of the basin showing 2-m isohypses; 
the values denote the altitude relative to an arbitrary reference point; the 
total area shown covers 7.2 ha; B: map showing the terrain units and the 
location of the permanent plot; C: cross-sections showing representative 
soils along the slopes of the U-shaped valley and the V-shaped valley; D: 
cover and name of the terrain units.  

 
24 
The floodplain plot (also denominated monitoring plot 2, or M2) is located 
on a sporadically inundated floodplain of the Caquetá River 
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1993, 1995). This land unit is characteristically 
built up by so-called river bank complexes (convex-concave systems of up 
to 2 m high river banks alternating with depressions, which run more or 
less parallel to the main channel of the Caquetá River) and poorly drained 
basins. The plot was established along the right bank of the Caquetá River 
(downstreams) at 250 m distance from the river, and about 2.5 km north of 
Sumaeta island (Fig. 2-1). The coordinates of the plot are: 0° 37' S, 72°10' 
W. Its altitude is approximately 155 m above sea level. 
The floodplain of the Caquetá River is locally called "rebalse" or "bajo" 
(Spanish), and "cajahó (Muinane). In principle, the plot is only flooded 
when the water level of the Caquetá River is exceptionally high. This 
occurs every 9-11 years (according to local indigenous informants). Such 
events are known as "conejeras". Between May and July 1989 the water 
level reached up to about 2 m above the average surface level of the plot. 
Each year, between May and July, the concave parts of the plot (Fig. 2-4) 
become inundated by rain water for about one month. This inundation 
usually starts in a depression in the eastern part of the plot, which carries 
water only during the rainiest time of year. For example, during June-July 
1990, some parts of the plot were covered by standing water, at a depth of 
less than 1 m for one month. Due to the low frequency of flooding by the 
Caquetá River, and the inundation of the lower parts by rainwater, the 
forest in the floodplain plot can be seen as intermediate between a seasonal 
várzea and a swamp (sensu Prance 1980). However, in this dissertation the 
terms várzea and floodplain forest are used, in line with other studies in the 
area (Urrego 1991). Given its transitional nature and the relatively low 
influence of flooding by river water, we suggest caution when comparing 
the results presented here with those of typical Amazonian várzea. 
The soil forming processes in the floodplain plot are highly influenced by 
the continuous supply of organic material from the vegetation and the 
periodic deposition of sediments during river floods. The fluctuations of 
the water table induces the alternating reduction and oxidation of the soil 
pedon. Evidence for this are the gray, olive-green and orange mottles, 
which occur especially in the soils of the basins and at larger depth in the 
soils of the convex river banks. Soils were classified as Typic Tropaquept, 

 
25 
Typic and Aquic Dystropept (SSS 1987; Ordóñez 1990). Duivenvoorden 
and Lips (1993, 1995) described a soil pit in the plot (Appendix 1, profile 
126). In the forest directly surrounding this pit they measured a yearly 
above-ground fine litter fall of 1070 ± 132 g m
-2
 y
-1
 (mean ± one SD) in 
1989-1990 (Lips and Duivenvoorden 1996). The organic material in the 
ectorganic horizons had a Mean Residence Time of only 1.0 y 
(Duivenvoorden and Lips 1995). 
2.5 
Plot location, plot size and sampling set-up 
The position of the plots within each land unit was selected such as to 
ensure that the terrain characteristics regarding relief were similar. 
Because slopes were hardly developed in the floodplain unit, the upland 
plot was established at the summit and upper slope positions to minimize 
the slope (Fig. 2-3). Both plots were set up in forests that lacked any sign 
of recent human activities. Also in the buffer zones of 100 to 300 m 
around the plots (Phillips and Baker 2002; Vallejo et al. 2005), no signs of 
human activities were present. 
The conspicuous presence of charcoal in the soils of the upland plot 
(Alarcón 1990) and the remains of pottery found in nearby fluvial terraces 
of the Caquetá River (Mora et al. 1991; Mora 2003) demonstrate the 
ancient human occupation and associated change of the forest cover at the 
monitoring sites. However, at the time of the establishment of the plots the 
forests did not show any evidence of recent human interventions. This was 
also concluded from the presence in the forests of large trees with highly 
valuable timber, as Cedrela odorata (Meliaceae, red cedar) in the 
floodplain forest and Mezilaurus itauba (Lauraceae, Itaúba) in the upland 
forest. 
At the start, in 1989 (Table 2-1) one square 1-ha plot was installed at the 
upland site (part I in Fig. 2-5). Permanent plots of 1 ha have traditionally 
been the standard unit of sample area in tropical moist forest inventories, 
facilitating comparison and also yielding an optimal ratio area/perimeter 
(Synnott 1979, 1991; Jonkers 1987; Alder and Synnott 1992; Dallmeier 
1992). However, on the basis of analyses (not shown) of the first data 
about the forest diversity using Hill's family of curves (Pielou 1975; 
Magurran 1988; Krebs 1989) the plot size was increased to 1.8 ha 
(Londoño and Alvarez 1991). To enlarge the original upland plot of 100 x 

 
26 
100 m, a strip of 20 m wide was added first (part II in Fig. 2-5). At a later 
stage an extra strip of 50 x 120 m (part III in Fig. 2-5) was established to 
obtain the final plot of 120 x 150 m (1.8 ha). One year later, in October 
1990 (Table 2.1), an equivalent plot of 120 x 150 m (1.8 ha) was 
established in floodplain forest, with identical parts I, II and III (Fig 2.5). 
The plot inventories included all vascular plant individuals that were 
entirely or partially rooted (i.e. with trunks attached to the soil) inside the 
plots. Plants rooting precisely on the plot boundaries were included, even 
if the aerial parts were outside the plot boundaries. The sampling intensity 
was inversely proportional to the abundance of individuals per size class. 
Large individuals (DBH ≥ 10 cm; DBH is diameter at 130 cm) were 
sampled in the entire plot, while the smaller plants were only sampled in a 
part (Fig. 2-5). The area of the subplots differed per size class (Dubois 
1980; Matteuci and Colma 1982; Jonkers 1987; Campbell et al. 2002; 
Oldeman et al. 2006). Large individuals were sampled in 10 x 10 m 
subplots, intermediate sized shrubs, lianas and small trees in 5 x 5 m 
subplots, and small plants (mostly herbs and seedlings) in 2 x 2 m subplots 
(Table 2-2). 
To minimise damage to the plants, the inventory was done in the following 
sequence: a) demarcation of plots and subplots by setting up the grid of 10 
x 10 m; b) inventory of size class C4 (Table 2-2); c) inventory of C1; d) 
inventory of plants of size classes C2 and C3; and e) measurement of 
additional variables.  
Table 2-1. Installment and census dates of the permanent plots.  
 
Activity 
Date 
Days  Months  Years 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə