Flora and vegetation of aviva lease area



Yüklə 1.37 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/13
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1.37 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

 



 

URS0808/195/08 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

 

FLORA AND VEGETATION OF 

AVIVA LEASE AREA 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Prepared for: 



URS Australia Pty Ltd 

 

on behalf of 



 

Aviva Corporation Ltd 

 

Prepared by: 



Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

 



 

February 2009 

 

 



 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 

L

TD

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

 



 

URS0808/195/08 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

 

 Page 

 

1.



 

SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ 1

 

 

2.



 

INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................... 3

 

2.1


 

Location .............................................................................................................................................. 3

 

2.2


 

Climate ................................................................................................................................................ 3

 

2.3


 

Landforms and Soils ........................................................................................................................... 4

 

2.4


 

Vegetation ........................................................................................................................................... 4

 

2.5


 

Declared Rare, Priority and Threatened Species ................................................................................. 4

 

2.6


 

Threatened Ecological Communities (TEC’s) .................................................................................... 5

 

2.7


 

Local and Regional Significance ......................................................................................................... 5

 

 

3.



 

OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................................................. 6

 

 

4.



 

METHODS ................................................................................................................................................. 6

 

 

5.



 

RESULTS ................................................................................................................................................... 8

 

5.1


 

Flora .................................................................................................................................................... 8

 

5.2


 

Rare and Priority Flora ........................................................................................................................ 8

 

5.2.1


 

Rare Flora .............................................................................................................................. 8

 

5.2.2


 

Priority Flora ......................................................................................................................... 9

 

5.3


 

Significant Flora ................................................................................................................................ 13

 

5.4


 

Vegetation ......................................................................................................................................... 13

 

5.5


 

Conservation Status of Vegetation .................................................................................................... 15

 

5.5.1


 

Threatened Ecological Community ..................................................................................... 15

 

5.5.2


 

Communities of Regional and Local Significance .............................................................. 16

 

5.6


 

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems ................................................................................................ 17

 

 

6.



 

DISCUSSION ........................................................................................................................................... 17

 

 

7.



 

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS ....................................................................................................................... 21

 

 

8.



 

REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................................... 21

 

 

 



TABLES 

 

1: 


Temperature and Rainfall Data for Eneabba, Long term Averages and Survey Time (Mean rainfall 1964 

– 2008, Mean Temperatures 1972 – 2008) 

2:  

Condition rating scale from Bush Forever (Government of Western Australia 2000 based on Keighery 



1994) 

3: 


Threatened Ecological Communities found in the Eneabba area 

4:  


Summary of Vegetation types to be directly impacted within the survey area by the proposals (CWC- 

Central West Coal, CCP – Coolimba Power Project) 

 

 

FIGURES 



 

1: 


Eneabba Plant Communities and Rare and Priority Flora 

2: 


Eneabba Plant Communities and Rare and Priority Flora 

3: 


Tetratheca nephelioides (R) occurrences along the infrastructure corridor 

__________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

 



 

URS0808/195/08 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

APPENDICES 



 

A1:   


Definition of Rare and Priority Flora Species (Department of Environment and Conservation 2008a) 

A2: 


Definition of Threatened Flora Species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 

1999 [Commonwealth]) 

A3: 


Definition of Threatened Ecological Communities (Department of Environment and Conservation 

2008d)  


A4: 

Definition of Priority Ecological Communities (Department of Environment and Conservation 2009e) 

A5:  

Definition of Standard Control Codes for Declared Plant Species in Western Australia (Department of 



Agriculture and Food 2009) 

B: 


Vascular Plant Species recorded on Aviva Survey Area, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 

C: 


Potential and Recorded Declared Rare and Priority Flora in the Aviva Survey Area 

D: 


Recorded Rare and Priority Flora, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 

E: 


Summary of Vascular Plant Species Recorded by Vegetation Community within the Aviva Survey 

Area. 


F: 

Species located in each occurrence of the Ferricrete Floristic Community (Rocky Springs Type) 

  


 

1. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

1. 

SUMMARY 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd was commissioned by URS (Australia) Pty Ltd to conduct a flora and 

vegetation survey for a proposed Coolimba Power Station Project and Central West Coal Projects south 

of Eneabba, Western Australia.  The objectives of the study were to investigate the potential flora and 

vegetation issues in the project area.  Fieldwork was undertaken by Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd in the 

spring months of 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 included a search for Declared Rare and Priority flora, 

defining and mapping the plant communities present, assessing the condition of the plant communities 

and reviewing the local and regional conservation values of the flora and vegetation.  Detailed 

recordings were undertaken at representative plant communities. 

 

A total of 512 taxa (including subspecies and varieties) from 182 genera and 64 families were recorded 



within the Aviva Project area. A total of 48 families, 123 genera and 261 taxa were found in the 

southern section of the Lake Logue Nature Reserve and near Lake Indoon. The dominant families in the 

Aviva Project area were Myrtaceae (106 taxa), Proteaceae (96 taxa), Papilionaceae (51 taxa) and 

Haemodoraceae (31 taxa). None of the 26 introduced species are listed by the Department of 

Agriculture and Food as Declared Plants pursuant to Section 37 of the Agriculture and Related 

Resources Protection Act 1976 [WA]. 

 

Previous records from the Department of Environment and Conservation databases indicate that there 



are potentially twelve Rare, four Priority 1, sixteen Priority 2, thirty eight Priority 3 taxa and seventeen 

Priority 4 contained in the local area.  Of these database records, seven are listed as Endangered and, 

four Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999  [cth]. 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd fieldwork recorded, two Declared Rare, one  Priority 1, ten Priority 2, 14 

Priority 3 and seven Priority 4 of these taxa.  Seven taxa, consisting of one Priority 1, five Priority 2 and 

one Priority 3 taxa were not previously recorded in the survey area. One Priority 1, two Priority 2, three 

Priority 3 and two Priority 4 taxa were found in Lake Logue reserve. 

 

Potentially four declared rare, seven Priority 2, ten Priority 3, and seven Priority 4 taxa will be directly 



affected by either the Coolimba Power Project or the Central West Coal Project. 

 

The Declared Rare taxa Tetratheca nephelioides  (R) was recorded along the preferred infrastructure 



corridor, within community T1. The current proposal  will directly impact 706 individuals, while 

another 860 will be left in South Eneabba Reserve. If the preferred route remains in the proposed 

position, then there will be a need to apply for State Ministerial approval to take this species.  The 

option of avoiding the areas of native vegetation along the preferred infrastructure corridor has been 

reviewed and obviously from a conservation perspective it would be preferable to place the proposed 

infrastructure facilities in the already cleared paddocks to the south of the current alignment.  The next 

option would be to locate the proposed infrastructure facilities south of the track and north of the 

fenceline to minimize the impact on the conservation areas.  The latter will require State and Federal 

Ministerial approvals for taking of the rare and threatened flora species. 

 

A few Declared Rare Eucalypts (Eucalyptus crispataEucalyptus impensa and Eucalyptus johnsoniana



have been recorded historically on and near the preferred infrastructure corridor.  Some of these records 

are no longer present due to the clearing activities associated with the adjacent agricultural 

developments.  State and Federal Ministerial Approval will be required for any taking of these species 

that are listed as Rare under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 [WA] and as Endangered or Vulnerable 

under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 [cth].  

 

A number of Priority taxa will be directly impacted by both of the Cental West Coal Project and the 



Coolimba Power  Project. Of particular interest are those that are locally uncommon or are range 

extensions. Taxa that fall into this category include; Acacia flabellifolia (P3), Calytrix purpurea (P2), 



Calytrix eneabbensis (P4), and Verticordia aurea (P4). All of these taxa have been found in locations 

that will be directly impacted by the Central West Coal Project. 

 

A number of Priority taxa will be exposed to indirect impacts, with the main concerns being the 



increased exposed of surrounding Priority Flora to Phytophthora Dieback and unsustaining fire regimes 

(e.g. regular fires which may restrict regeneration through seeds or propagules).  



 

2. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

A substantial proportion of the survey area has been burnt regularly in recent years and this may have 



influenced the coverage of flora. Some species may have been impacted negatively by the intensity of 

the fire, however many ephemeral species were covered in sampling after the fires. So on balance the 

coverage was considered to be comprehensive. 

 

The vegetation on the southern part of the project area was mapped previously by Woodman 



Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd. This area was re-assessed and mapped by Mattiske Consulting Pty 

Ltd in November 2005 and updated in the spring months of 2008.  Twenty-four plant communities were 

recorded in the Aviva survey area, comprising five heath communities, eight Proteaceae and Myrtaceae-

dominated communities, eight Eucalypt communities and two chenopod communities (Figures 1 and 2). 

A large percentage of the Aviva survey area is also completely degraded farmland. The condition of the 

vegetation (based on the Bush Forever condition ratings) ranges from completely degraded in the 

pastures to excellent in the bushland areas. 

 

The H1 heath community included pockets of lateritic rises, and therefore has some species in common 



with the only known Threatened Ecological Community in the Eneabba area, the Ferricrete Floristic 

Community  -  Rocky Springs type. Community 72 Ferricrete Floristic Community is listed as 

Vulnerable by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2006).  This Threatened Ecological 

Community is not currently listed under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity 



Conservation Act 1999 [cth]. On the basis of database search and a comparison with regional datasets 

(Department of Environment and Conservation 2009a), the majority of the flora recorded on the Rocky 

Springs Ferricrete communities are represented either on the northern Swan Coastal Plain or in the 

adjacent regions.  Twenty-nine of the sixty taxa recorded within the local TEC Ferricrete Community 

(Hamilton-Brown  et al.  2004) were recorded within the survey area.  The majority of these species 

occur more widely, and therefore the significance of the latter is difficult to assess in view of the lack of 

regional studies on the Rocky Springs TEC. The project as proposed does not impact directly on the 

Rocky Springs TEC. 

 

A number of other communities were classed as regionally or locally significant. These include; T1, E1, 



E2, E4, E5, E6, H1, H2, H3, H5, T2, and, S1.These communities are represented in the Eridoon and 

Tathra vegetation systems. These vegetation systems are currently represented in conservation reserves 

(3.49 % (Tathra) and 14.94 % (Eridoon) of the pre –  European extent of those vegetation systems). 

Both projects will only affect a maximum of 0.268 % of the Tathra system and 1.224 % of the Eridoon 

system. Assessment of whether the current conservation reserves are adequate will depend on an 

assessment of the impact of all current projects in the region.    

 

In reviewing the lifeforms of the other plants within the communities on the Aviva project area, it is 



apparent that the majority of plants are dependent on soil moisture from rainfall events and that the 

majority of the plant species are herbs or small shrubs that will  have shorter root systems.  This 

relationship can then be expanded to their dominance within the respective plant communities.  The 

heath and scrub (H2 and T1) communities that dominate the communities on the project area are largely 

dominated by shallow rooted species or shrubs that are primarily reliant on the soil moisture levels 

being maintained from rainfall events.  These heath and scrub communities also dominate the south-

eastern corner of Lake Logue Nature Reserve near Lake  Indoon which may be impacted through the 

temporary lowering of groundwater levels.  The Eucalyptus  camaldulensis woodland around Lake 

Indoon has already been subjected to various periods of drought and despite some stress in the trees 

have survived these periods.  Further, this woodland is further away from any potential groundwater 

drawdown areas. 

 

A number of issues will require consideration if one or both projects are to go ahead. These include, but 



are not limited to the following

 



Risks posed to Tetratheca nephelioides as a species by the current infrastructure route 

associated with the Coolimba Power Station. 

 

Risks posed to community types, particularly T1, at a regional scale 



 

Risks posed to other Priority Flora, particularly Calytrix purpurea  (P2),  Acacia flabellifolia 



(P3), and Calytrix eneabbensis (P4) in the Central West Coal Project as these taxa are locally 

uncommon or range extensions. 



 

3. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 



 

Effect of indirect impacts such as emissions, weeds, too frequent fires and Phytophthora 

Dieback on surrounding vegetation, particularly Priority and Rare Flora. 

 



Potential indirect impacts from groundwater changes during the mining operations. 

2. 

INTRODUCTION 

Aviva Corporation Ltd proposes to establish a power facility (Coolimba Power Station Project – CPP) 

and coal mine (Central West Coal Project - CWC) to the west of the Brand Highway near Eneabba. The 

survey area consists of both native vegetation and previously cleared agricultural areas. 

 

The survey area has been subject to numerous surveys including; in part by Woodman Environmental 



Consulting Pty Ltd (2001), and Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008.  This report 

summarises the findings from these studies. 



2.1 

Location 

The survey area is located approximately 10 km south west of Eneabba, and approximately 275 km Nor 

north west of Perth. The area is located in the Irwin Botanical District of the South-western Botanical 

Province as recognized by Diels (1906) and later developed by Gardner (1942) and Beard (1980, 1990) 

and the Geraldton Sandplain IBRA region (Thackway and Cresswell 1995, Department of 

Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2004).  



2.2 

Climate 

The climate associated with the project area is consider to be by Beard (1990) as Dry Warm 

Mediterranean, with  historically, only 4 months receiving more rainfall than what is evaporated 

(Gentilli 1972). Table 1 contains the rainfall (long term average, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008) and 

temperature (long term average) for the nearest weather station, Eneabba (Bureau of Meteorology 

2009). Rainfall has been average for between 2005 and 2008 when compared against long term 

averages. 

 

 



Table 1: 

Temperature and Rainfall Data for Eneabba, Long term Averages and Survey Time 

(Mean rainfall 1964 – 2008, Mean Temperatures 1972 – 2008) 

 

 



Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Annual 

Mean 


Rainfall 

(mm) 


7.1 

13.9 


12.8 

27.3 


71.2 

104.1 


94.8 

75.4 


45.1 

24.7 


14.6 

9.6 


503.4 

2005 Rainfall 

(mm) 



1.7 



16.6 

15.9 


71.9 

127.1 


28.9 

88.1 


76.6 

33.7 


2.3 

1.9 


464.7 

2006 Rainfall 

(mm) 

27.2 


13.8 

6.6 



45.6 

17.8 


58.9 

88 


47.8 

7.5 


5.5 

34 


352.7 

2007 Rainfall 

(mm) 

5.9 


0.8 

0.6 


12.4 

28 


75.7 

114.1 


67.9 

38.8 


26.7 

1.3 


25.8 

398 


2008 Rainfall 

(mm) 


93.2 


7.2 

24.2 


13.8 

60.5 


153.1 

25 


58.2 

32.9 


20 

3.7 


491.8 

Mean Max 

Temp (º C) 

35.9 


36.1 

33.4 


29.1 

24.2 


20.8 

19.6 


20.5 

22.9 


26.2 

29.7 


33.2 

27.6 


Mean Min 

Temp (º C) 

18.5 

19.5 


18.1 

15.3 


12.4 

10.2 


9.1 

9.7 



11.3 

13.8 


16.2 

13.6 


 

 

4. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə