Flora and vegetation of aviva lease area



Yüklə 1.38 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə4/13
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü1.38 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13

Vegetation 

 

Twenty four plant communities were recorded in the Aviva survey area, comprising five heath 

communities, eight Proteaceae and Myrtaceae-dominated communities, eight Eucalypt communities 

and two chenopod communities (Figures 1 and 2. Some communities such as T1 and T4 had higher 

species richness than other communities (Appendix E). This is due to a higher number of sampling 

points occurring in these communities due to their spatial extents (Table 4).   

 

All of the defined communities are represented in either the Tathra or Eridoon vegetation systems 



(Beard 1979). Comparison of Pre –  European vegetation extents of these vegetation systems with the 

direct impact of the projects and formal conservation reserves shows that the impact on the Eridoon 

vegetation system will be greater than the Tathra system (Table 5). This is expected as the extent of the 

Tathra vegetation system is greater  (Table 5). Although Pre –  European extents may not give an 

accurate indication of the complete impact of the Projects, it will accurately describe what percentage is 

currently in Conservation Estate and provides a conservative estimate of the impact of the proposals. 

Apart from the greater impact on the Eridoon systems, the amount that is in Conservation Estate is 

much greater than what will be affected. However, these figures should be compared with already 

approved projects to assess the impact at a regional level. 

 

Table 5: 



Summary of the direct impact of the proposals on Pre –  European Extents of 

Vegetation Systems  

 

Vegetation 

system 

Total Pre - European 

extents (ha) 

Pre – European (% impacted) 

Held in Conservation 

Estate (%) 

CWC 

CPP 

TATHRA 


396178 

0.222 


0.046 

3.49 


ERIDOON 

91283 


0.896 

0.328 


14.94 

 

The community type T1 is considered to be regionally significant as it contains two rare taxa, 



Tetratheca nephelioides and Eucalyptus crispata. Community types E1, E2, E4, E6, H1, H2, H3, H5, 

and T2 are considered to be locally significant as they contain Priority Flora (Environmental Protection 

Authority 2004), while communities E5 and S1 are locally significant as the proposals clear a 

significant amount of their known local area. The level of community reservation can be inferred from 

the regional vegetation system data. 


 

20. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Potential TEC 

 

The H1 heath community included pockets of lateritic rises, and therefore has some species in common 



with the only known Threatened Ecological Community in the Eneabba  area, the Ferricrete Floristic 

Community  -  Rocky Springs type. Community 72 Ferricrete Floristic Community is listed as 

Vulnerable by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2006).  This Threatened Ecological 

Community is not currently listed under the Commonwealth EPBC Act (1999). On the basis of database 

search and a comparison with regional datasets (Department of Environment and Conservation 2009a), 

the majority of the flora recorded on the Rocky Springs Ferricrete communities are represented either 

on the northern Swan Coastal Plain or in the adjacent regions.  Twenty-nine of the sixty taxa recorded 

within the local TEC Ferricrete Community (Hamilton-Brown  et al.  2004) were recorded within the 

survey area.  The majority of these species occur more widely, and therefore the significance of the 

latter is difficult to assess in view of the lack of regional studies on the Rocky Springs TEC. The project 

as proposed does not impact directly on the Rocky Springs TEC. 

 

As indicated earlier in this report there appears to be debate over the extent and definition of the Rocky 



springs ferricrete TEC.  The latter results from a lack of regional assessments and a clear understanding 

of the relationships between ferricrete layers and floristic data.  The local  findings indicate that the 

exposed ferricrete is not at the location as specified through the Department of Environment and 

Conservation (2006) database and that the ferricrete layer extends under large sections of the systems 

within the coastal plains.  Therefore the whole question about the significance of the TEC remains open 

to debate until the TEC is better defined in composition and spatial extent.  Meanwhile the data as 

collated on the flora and plant/soil relationships indicate that there are no species within the TEC that 

are restricted to the TEC and therefore the risk of any indirect impacts remains low.  This low risk is 

further substantiated by the dominance of flora species in the range of communities within the Aviva 

project area that are reliant on rainfall rather than groundwater. 

 

Groundwater Dependent Communities 

 

In reviewing the lifeforms of the other plants within the communities on the Aviva project area, it is 



apparent that the majority of plants are dependent on soil moisture from rainfall events and that the 

majority of the plant species are herbs or small shrubs that will  have shorter root systems.  This 

relationship can then be expanded to their dominance within the respective plant communities.  The 

heath and scrub (H2 and T1) communities that dominate the communities on the project area are largely 

dominated by shallow rooted species or shrubs that are primarily reliant on the soil moisture levels 

being maintained from rainfall events.  These heath and scrub communities also dominate the south-

eastern corner of the Lake Indoon Nature Reserve which may be impacted through the temporary 

lowering of groundwater levels.  The Eucalyptus  camaldulensis  var.  obtusa  woodlands around Lake 

Indoon have already been subjected to various periods of drought and despite some stress in the trees 

have survived these periods. 

 

Conclusions 

 

A number of issues will require consideration if one or both projects are to go ahead. These include, but 



are not limited to the following; 

 



Risks posed to Tetratheca nephelioides as a species by the current infrastructure route 

associated with the Coolimba Power Station Project. 

 

Risks posed to community types, particularly T1, at a regional scale 



 

Risks posed to other Priority Flora, particularly Calytrix purpurea  (P2),  Acacia flabellifolia 



(P3), and Calytrix eneabbensis (P4) in the Central West Coal Project as these taxa are locally 

uncommon or range extensions. 

 

Effect of indirect impacts such as emissions, weeds, too frequent fires and Phytophthora 



Dieback on surrounding vegetation, particularly Priority and Rare Flora. 

 



Potential indirect impacts from groundwater changes during the mining operations. 

 

21. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

7. 

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS 

The following personnel of Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd have been involved with this project: 

 

Principal Ecologist: 



Dr E. M. Mattiske 

 

Experienced Botanists: 



Dr C. Hancock 

Mrs L. Cobb  

Mrs. B. Koch 

 

Botanists: 



 

Mr D. Rathbone   

Ms B. Taylor 

Mr A. Ruschmann 

Mr. D. Marsh 

Mr. M. Boardman 

Ms S. Robinson 

Ms F. de Wit 

Ms. M. Van Wees 

Mr. R. Burrows 

Mr. A. Robinson 

Ms S. Thomson 

Ms F. Smith 

Mr S. Reiffer 



8. 

REFERENCES 

Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 [WA] 

 

Beard, J.S. (1979) 



The vegetation of Dongara, Western Australia. Map and explanatory memoir. 1:250 000 

series. Vegmap Publications. Perth 

 

Beard, J.S. (1980) 



A New Phytogeographic Map of Western Australia.  Western Australian Herbarium Notes 

Number 3: 37-58.   

 

Beard, J.S. (1981) 



Vegetation Survey of Western Australia.  Swan.  Map and Explanatory Notes, Sheet 7, 

1:1,000,000 Series, University of Western Australia Press, Perth. 

 

Beard, J.S. (1990) 



 Plant Life of Western Australia. Kangaroo Press Pty Ltd, Kenthurst, N.S.W. 

 

Blackall, William E. Grieve, Brian J. (1982).  



How to know Western Australian wildflowers : a key to the flora of the extratropical regions of 

Western Australia. Part 4. University of Western Australia Press. Nedlands, W.A. 

 

Brown A. Thomson-Dans C., Marchant N. eds (1998) 



Western Australia’s Threatened Flora Department of Conservation and Land Management, 

Como, Western Australia 

 

Butcher R. (2007) 



New taxa of ‘leafless’ Tetratheca  (Elaeocarpaceae, formerly Tremandraceae) from Western 

Australia. Australian Systematic Botany. 20(2) 139–160.   

 

22. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology (2008) 

Climate statistics for Australian locations, Eneabba. Accessed from:     

://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averages/tables/cw_008225.shtml

 accessed on : 24 th January 

2008 


 

Crisp, M.D. (1982) 

Daviesia spiralis and D. debilior (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae), two new species occurring in 

the Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Nuytsia. 9: 9-16. 

 

Department of Agriculture and Food (2008)  



Declared Plants List. 

 

 http://agspsrv95.agric.wa.gov.au/dps/version02/01_plantsearch.asp



 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2006)  



List of Threatened Ecological Communities on the Department of Environment and 

Conservation’s Threatened Ecological  Community (TEC) Database endorsed by the Minister 

for the Environment 

http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,1/gid,2800/task,doc_downl

oad/

 

 



Department of Environment and Conservation (2009a) 

Max Version 2.1.1.129. Department of Environment and Conservation.  

 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2009b)  



Definitions, Categories and Criteria for Threatened and Priority Ecological Communities  

://www.dec.wa.gov.au/component/option,com_docman/Itemid,/gid,402/task,doc_download/

 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation (2009)  



Priority Ecological Communities Listing .  Listing supplied by Department of Environment 

and Conservation, August 2008.     

 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2004) 



 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA)  v 6.1 Canberra ACT  

 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2008) 



Approved Conservation Advice for Eucalyptus johnsoniana (Johnson’s Mallee). Accessed from 

://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/14516-conservation-

advice.pdf

 on 18 February 2009 at 15:26 WDST 

 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2009a) 



EPBC Act List of Threatened Flora  

http://www.deh.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicthreatenedlist.pl?wanted=flora 

 

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (2009b) 



EPBC Act List of Threatened Ecological Communities. 

 

://www.deh.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publiclookupcommunities.pl

 

 

Diels, L. (1906) 



Die Pflanzenwelt von Western-Australien sudlich des Wendekreises.  Vegn. Erde 7, Leipzig. 

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 [Commonwealth] 

 

Environmental Protection Authority (2004) 



Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental Factors (in accordance with the Environmental 

Protection Act 1986) –  Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact 

Assessment in Western Australia.  No. 51.  June 2004.  

 

 



 

23. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

Gardner, C.A. (1942) 



The vegetation of Western Australia with special reference to climate and soils.  J. Proc. R. 

Soc. West. Aust. 28:11-87. 



 

Gentilli J. (1972) 

 

Australian climate patterns. Thomas Nelson Australia, Melbourne 

 

Government of Western Australia (2000) 



Bush Forever Volume 2. Directory of Bush Forever Sites. Department of 

Environmental Protection, Perth. 

 

Hamilton-Brown, S., Broun, G., and Rees, R (2004) 



Interim Recovery Plant 154.  Ferricrete floristic community (Rocky springs type).  Interim 

Recovery Plan 2004-2009.  Prepared by Department of Conservation and Land Management. 

 

Hnatuik R.J. (1993) 



A revision of the genus Eremaea (Myrtaceae). Nuytsia. 9:2. Department of Conservation and 

Land Management, Como, Western Australia 

 

Keighery, B.J. (1994) 



Bushland Plant Survey. A Guide to Plant Community Survey for the Community. Wildflower 

Society of WA (Inc.), Western Australia. 



 

 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd (2006) 



Flora and Vegetation Assessment of the Aviva Lease Area.  Unpublished Report prepared for 

URS Australia Pty Ltd for Aviva Pty Ltd. 



 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd (2009) 



Flora and Vegetation Values of Lake Logue Reserve. Unpublished Report in Preparation for 

Aviva Pty Ltd. 



 

Murray B.R., Zeppel M.J.B, Hose G.C., and Eamus, D. (2003) 



Groundwater-dependent ecosystems in Australia: It's more than just water for rivers. 

Ecological Management & Restoration. 4 ( 2), Pages 110 - 113 

 

Paczkowska, G and Chapman, A.R. (2000) 



The Western Australian Flora A Descriptive Catalogue.  Published by Wildflower Society of 

Western Australia (Inc.), Western Australian Herbarium (CALM) and Botanic Gardens and 

Parks Authority. 

 

Patrick, S. and Brown, A. (2001) 



Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District. Department of Conservation 

and Land Management, Western Australia. 



 

Stack G. and Broun. (2004) 



Eneabba Mallee (Eucalyptus impensa) Interim Recovery Plan 2004-2009. Department of 

Conservation and Land Management, WA, 2004. Accessed from 

://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/e-impensa/pubs/e-

impensa.pdf

 on 18 Feb 2009 

 

Thackway, R. and Cresswell, I.D. (1995) 



An Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia: a framework for setting priorities in 

the national reserves system cooperative program.  Australian Nature Conservation Agency 

Canberra. 



 

Western Australian Herbarium (2009).  

FloraBase  —  The Western Australian Flora. Department of Environment and Conservation. 

://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/

  


 

24. 


 

 

 



URS0808/195/08 

 

M



ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 



P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

Wildlife Conservation Act (1950-1980) [WA] 



 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd (2001) 



Flora and Vegetation Mapping –  IPL South Vegetation Mapping.  Unpublished report 

prepared for Iluka Resources Ltd – Iluka 00-16 



A1.

APPENDIX A1: 

DEFINITION OF RARE AND PRIORITY FLORA SPECIES 

(Western Australian Herbarium 2009)

 

 



Conservation

Code

 

Category

 

R

 

Declared Rare Flora – Extant Taxa

 

“Taxa which have been adequately searched for and are deemed



to be in the wild either rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise

in need of special protection and have been gazetted as such.”

 

P1

 

Priority One – Poorly Known Taxa

 

“Taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5)



populations which are under threat, either due to small population

size, or being on lands under immediate threat. Such taxa are

under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but are in

urgent need of further survey.”

 

P2

 

Priority Two – Poorly Known Taxa

 

“Taxa which are known from one or a few (generally <5)



populations, at least some of which are not believed to be under

immediate threat (i.e. not currently endangered). Such taxa are

under consideration for declaration as ‘rare flora’, but urgently

need further survey.”

 

P3

 

Priority Three – Poorly Known Taxa

 

“Taxa which are known from several populations, and the taxa



are not believed to be under immediate threat (i.e. not currently

endangered), either due to the number of known populations

(generally >5), or known populations being large, and either

widespread or protected. Such taxa are under consideration for

declaration as ‘rare flora’ but need further survey.”

 

P4

 

Priority Four – Rare Taxa

 

“Taxa which are considered to have been adequately surveyed



and which, whilst being rare (in Australia), are not currently

threatened by any identifiable factors. These taxa require

monitoring every 5-10 years.”


A2.

APPENDIX A2: 

DEFINITION OF THREATENED FLORA SPECIES (Environment Protection and

Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 [Commonwealth])

 

Category Code

 

Category

 

Ex

 

Extinct 

 

Taxa which at a particular time if, at that time, there is no



reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has died.

 

ExW

 

Extinct in the Wild

 

Taxa which is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity



or as a naturalised population well outside its past range; or it has

not been recorded in its known and/or expected habitat, at

appropriate seasons, anywhere in its past range, despite

exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle

and form.

 

CE



Critically Endangered 

 

Taxa which at a particular time if, at that time, it is facing an



extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate

future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

 

E

 

Endangered 

 

Taxa which is not critically endangered and it is facing a very



high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate or near future,

as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

 

V

 

Vulnerable

 

Taxa which is not critically endangered or endangered and is



facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term

future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

 

CD

 

Conservation Dependent

 

Taxa which at a particular time if, at that time, the species is the



focus of a specific conservation program, the cessation of which

would result in the species becoming vulnerable, endangered or

critically endangered within a period of 5 years. 


A3.

APPENDIX A3 :

DEFINITION OF THREATENED ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES (Department

of Environment and Conservation 2009b)

 

Category 

 

Code

 

Category

 

PTD

 

Presumed Totally Destroyed

An ecological community will be listed as Presumed Totally Destroyed

if there are no recent records of the community being extant and either of

the following applies:

(i)


 

records within the last 50 years have not been confirmed

despite thorough searches or known likely habitats or;

(ii)


 

all occurrences recorded within the last 50 years have since

been destroyed.

 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   13


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə