Flora and vegetation of barrambie survey area, bore fields and water pipeline corridor



Yüklə 0.51 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü0.51 Mb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

 

 

 

 

FLORA AND VEGETATION 

 

OF BARRAMBIE SURVEY AREA, BORE FIELDS 

 

AND WATER PIPELINE CORRIDOR 

 

 

 

 



 

Prepared for: 



Aquaterra  

and 

Reed Resources Ltd 

 

Prepared by: 



Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

October 2009 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



M

ATTISKE 

C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 

L

TD

 

 

 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

 

1.

 



SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ 1

 

 



2.

 

INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................... 2



 

2.1

 

Location ................................................................................................................................................. 2

 

2.2

 

Flora and Vegetation ............................................................................................................................. 2

 

2.3

 

Groundwater Dependant Ecosystems .................................................................................................... 2

 

2.4

 

Climate .................................................................................................................................................. 4

 

2.5

 

Clearing of Native Vegetation ............................................................................................................... 4

 

2.6

 

Rare and Priority Flora ......................................................................................................................... 4

 

2.7

 

Threatened Ecological Communities ..................................................................................................... 5

 

2.8

 

Local and Regional Significance ........................................................................................................... 5

 

 

3.



 

OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................................................. 6

 

 

4.



 

METHODS ................................................................................................................................................. 6

 

 

5.



 

RESULTS ................................................................................................................................................... 7

 

5.1

 

Desktop Survey for Potential Rare and Priority Flora Species in the Survey Area .............................. 7

 

5.2

 

Flora ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

 

5.3

 

Ground Water Dependant Ecosystems ................................................................................................ 10

 

 

6.



 

DISCUSSION ........................................................................................................................................... 11

 

 

7.



 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................................................................................................... 13



 

 

8.



 

LIST


 

OF

 



PERSONNEL............................................................................................................................. 13

 

 



9.

 

REFERENCES .......................................................................................................................................... 14



 

 

 

TABLES 

 

1: 



Rare or Priority Flora with potential to occur in Survey Area 

 

 

FIGURES 

 

1: 



Barrambie Mine and Water Pipeline Vegetation 

2: 


Species Area Curve 

 

APPENDICES 

 

A1: 


Definition of Rare and Priority Flora Species 

A2: 


Categories of Threatened Flora Species 

A3: 


Definition of Threatened Ecological Communities 

A4: 


Definition of Priority Ecological Communities 

B: 


Vascular Plant Species recorded Barrambie Survey Area and Water Pipeline Corridor, 2005-2009 

C: 


Vascular Plant Species by Community recorded Barrambie Survey Area and Water Pipeline Corridor, 

 

2005-2009 



D: 

Summary of Site Recording Locations, Barrambie Survey Area and Water Pipeline Corridor, 2005-

2009 

 


 

 

1



 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



1.

 

SUMMARY 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd was commissioned by Aquaterra, on behalf of Reed Resources Limited, to 

define the flora and vegetation values of a water pipeline corridor, the Bore Fields area and undertake 

additional flora and vegetation surveys of proposed infrastructure facilities at the Barrambie tenement. 

Six botanists completed the survey during four trips, between 8

th

 - 12



th

 October 2007, 24

th

 – 26


th

 July 


2008, 6

th

 – 8



th

 April and 31

st

 August – 2



nd

 

 September 2009. 



Flora

 

 



A total of 33 families, 76 genera, 172 species and 192 taxa have been recorded within the survey area 

(Appendix B). Species representation was greatest amongst the Chenopodiaceae (38 taxa), Myoporaceae 

(24 taxa), Asteraceae (24 taxa) and Mimosaceae (21 taxa) families.  

 

Forty-two of the 193 recorded taxa are considered annual or biennial species (Appendix B). Of these 



Forty-two species, twenty five were recorded in September 2009.

 

 



Five of these taxa were introduced (weed) species, however none are declared pursuant to Section 37 of 

the Agriculture and Related Resources Act, 1976 (WA).

 

 

Rare, Priority and Threatened Flora 



 

No Declared Rare Flora species, pursuant to the Wildlife Conservation Act, 1950  or listed by the 

Department of Environment and Conservation were located during the survey.  No Priority species were 

recorded during the survey.

 

 

 



Vegetation 

Twenty Four plant communities were defined within the survey area covering the mining operations 

and the water pipeline (Figure 1). The communities differed in their structure, dominance and range of 

associated species and geographic factors. 

 

No Threatened Ecological Communities (TEC’s) as defined by the EPBC Act (1999) or the Department 



of Environment and Conservation (2009c) were observed in the survey area 

 

No Priority Ecological Communities (PEC’s) as defined by the Department of Environment and 



Conservation (2009b) were observed in the survey area. 

 

None of the Vegetation Communities recorded are considered locally or regionally significant. 



 

The plant communities varied in condition from Good-Degraded in areas that have been subject to 

grazing and where current infrastructure is in place, to Excellent in less disturbed areas of native 

vegetation. 

 

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems 

 

A few of defined communities; A12, M1, M2 and E1 have been identified as potentially being impacted 

by the placement of the bore field. These communities contain a range of tree and tall shrub species that 

may be dependent on groundwater; such as Acacia aneuraMelaleuca stereophloia, Melaleuca xerophila 

and Eucalyptus victrix.  These communities occur on the waterways and floodplains that are infrequently 

subjected to recent rainfall events.  In other periods the communities are subjected to periods of extended 

below average rainfall levels and consequently the list above is considered to be a conservative list of 

potential communities that may be influenced by water extraction.   As the floodplain is dominated by 

clay and clay loams soils the potential impacts of the ground water may be minimized as the 

communities may be more dependent on the rainfall events as compared to the groundwater levels.  

Therefore water extraction impacts should have limited impacts.  Nevertheless monitoring is 

recommended as a conservative approach to monitoring trends in the area. 



 

 

 

2



 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

2.

 

INTRODUCTION 

Mattiske Consulting Pty Ltd was commissioned by Aquaterra, on behalf of Reed Resources Limited, to 

define the flora and vegetation values of a water pipeline corridor and undertake additional flora and 

vegetation surveys of proposed infrastructure facilities at the Barrambie tenement. Six botanists 

completed the survey during four trips, between 8

th

 - 12



th

 October 2007, 24

th

 – 26


th

 July 2008, 6

th

 – 8


th

 

April and 31



st

 August – 2

nd

2.1 

Location 

 September 2009. 

The tenement area is located at Barrambie, approximately 75kms north of Sandstone in the Murchison 

region of Western Australia in the Austin Botanical District of the Eremaean Province, as defined by 

Beard (1990).  

2.2 

Flora and Vegetation 

The Eremaean Botanical Province is typified by plants from the families Mimosaceae (Acacia  spp.), 

Myrtaceae (Eucalyptus  spp.), Myoporaceae (Eremophila  spp.), Chenopodiaceae (Samphires, 

Bluebushes, Saltbushes), Asteraceae (Daisies) and Poaceae (grasses).   

 

Arid shrublands make up the vast majority of vegetation types encountered in the Murchison region.  



Most landscapes are dominated by mixed shrubland/scrubland, with few or no trees or perennial 

grasses, with shrubs apparently randomly scattered or loosely aggregated, and with large amounts of 

bare ground and shallow red soils exposed between the shrubs (Curry et al. 1994). 

 

The region is well known for the dominance of the Mulga (Acacia aneura) woodlands (Beard 1976, 



1990).  Optimum conditions for the Mulga occur on the extensive flats and plains.  The communities 

defined by Beard (1976) have recently been updated and refined by Hopkins et al.  (2001). The 

dominant vegetation types as defined by Hopkins et al. (2001) within the Murchison area are the mulga 

woodlands. 

 

The Austin Botanical District is essentially Mulga (Acacia aneura) woodlands associated with red 



loams over siliceous hardpans on the plains (van Vreeswyk, 1994) reducing to scrub on the rises and 

hills (Beard, 1990).  Mulga and Eremophila  shrublands dominate on stony plains, whilst chenopod 

communities are more often associated with duplex soils (Pringle, 1994). 

2.3 

Groundwater Dependant Ecosystems 

Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) are ecosystems that depend on groundwater, which 

include:  

 



Aquifer and cave ecosystems where stygofauna reside;  

 



Ecosystems dependent on the surface expression of groundwater (such as baseflow rivers and 

streams, wetlands and some floodplains); and  

 

Ecosystems dependent on the subsurface presence of groundwater (Eamus et al. 2006). 



Within a GDE, water use is likely to vary according to vegetation structure (ie tree water use versus 

shrub water use). The dependence of an ecosystem on groundwater may also be variable: infrequently 

utilised such as during plant establishment or in periods of drought; or continual dependence but 

facultative (ie species will utilise groundwater if present, but are not groundwater dependent for 

survival) (Eamus et al. 2006).  


 

 

3



 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 

Key indicator species, such as Melaleuca argentea  in the Daly River catchment in the Northern 

Territory (O’Grady et al. 2006) or Banksia sp. on the Swan Coastal Plain (Eamus et al. 2006), can be 

used to identify GDEs. However it has been shown that groundwater use varies according to the 

position in the landscape and trees at lower elevations closer to rivers are highly dependent compared to 

opportunistic groundwater use by trees at higher elevations (O’Grady et al. 2006).  

The groundwater dependence of ecosystems is rated according to the depth to the water table: 

0 – 10 m  

Groundwater dependent 

>10 m    

Reduced dependence on groundwater 

10 – 20 m  

Possible groundwater dependence, although negligible 

> 20 m   

Groundwater dependence low (Eamus et al. 2006). 

 

Due to the variability of groundwater use as mentioned above, the response of a GDE to groundwater 



drawdown will not be uniform. Hence determining the ecological water requirements (EWRs) and the 

subsequent statutory ecological water provisions (EWPs) according to the Environmental Protection 



Act 1986 [WA] and the Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914 [WA], necessary for the maintenance 

of the structure and function of GDEs is complex (Water and Rivers Commission 2000; Sinclair Knight 

Merz Pty Ltd 2001; Eamus and Froend 2006; Eamus et al. 2006).  

 

Monitoring ecosystems over long-term periods are necessary to determine the impacts of lowering 



groundwater availability, prior to and during pumping. Monitoring can indicate if GDEs are more 

resilient than predicted or determine if the ecosystem condition falls below acceptable levels, and then 

EWPs can be adjusted where required. However, ecosystems may respond proportionally or show a 

threshold response to declining water availability. Often ecosystems do not respond immediately and 

the “lag” effects on ecosystem health may result in exponentially declining condition. Changes in 

understorey species and an increase in introduced (exotic) species may indicate disturbances in the 

short-term within GDEs. Whilst overstorey species tend to be more resilient to changes in groundwater 

levels and are good long-term indicators of GDEs.  

To assess the impacts of altered groundwater levels as a result of EWPs set in Water Allocation Plans; 

monitoring should include an assessment of:  

 

species diversity; 



 

species cover and abundance; 



 

“weediness”; 



 

density of indicator species; 



 

community distribution (change in aerial extent); 



 

canopy health; 



 

water quality; and 



 

soil moisture (Eamus et al. 2006; Loomes et al. 2006; Water and Rivers Commission 2000).  



 

 

 

4



 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



2.4 

Climate 

The Murchison region is characterised by an arid climate with cool winters and hot, dry summers.  Rain 

falls in both the warm and cool seasons (Beard, 1990). Sandstone, located approximately 75kms to the 

south of Barrambie, has a mean annual precipitation of 247.9mm.  Mean summer maximum 

temperatures are 35.5

o

C dropping to 18.4



o

C in winter. Mean minima are 20.7

o

C and 5.9



o

2.5 

Clearing of Native Vegetation 

C for summer 

and winter, respectively (BOM, 2009).

 

The Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) Regulations 2004 dictate that any 

clearing of native vegetation in Western Australia requires a permit to do so from the Department of 

Environment and Conservation.  Native vegetation includes aquatic and terrestrial vegetation 

indigenous to Western Australia, and intentionally planted vegetation declared by regulation to be 

native vegetation, but not vegetation planted in a plantation or planted with commercial intent 

(Environmental Protection Act, 1986).  The Environmental Protection Act 1986 Section 51A, defines 

clearing as: “the killing or destruction of; the removal of; the severing or ringbarking of trunks or stems 

of; or the doing of substantial damage to some or all of the native vegetation in an area, including the  

 

 



flooding of land, the burning of vegetation, the grazing of stock or an act or activity that results in the 

above”   

 

Under the Environmental Protection (Clearing of Native Vegetation) Regulations 2004 - Regulation 6 – 



Environmentally sensitive areas are “the area covered by vegetation within 50 m of Rare Flora, to the 

extent to which the vegetation is continuous with the vegetation in which the Rare Flora is located”. 

Ministerial approval must be granted prior to any clearing of Declared Rare Flora, including a minimum 

of 50 m surrounding all populations of Rare Flora. The area covered by a threatened ecological 

community is also considered an environmentally sensitive area and therefore non-permitted, unless 

Ministerial approval is granted.

 

2.6 

Rare and Priority Flora 

Species of flora and fauna are defined as Rare or Priority conservation status where their populations 

are restricted geographically or threatened by local processes.  The Department of Environment and 

Conservation recognises these threats of extinction and consequently applies regulations towards 

population and species protection. 

 

Rare Flora species are gazetted under subsection 2 of section 23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 



[WA] and therefore it is an offence to “take” or damage rare flora without Ministerial approval.  Section 

23F of the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 [WA] defines “to take” as “… to gather, pick, cut, pull up, 

destroy, dig up, remove or injure the flora to cause or permit the same to be done by any means.”  

 

Priority Flora are under consideration for declaration as ‘Rare Flora’, but are in urgent need of further 



survey (Priority One to Three) or require monitoring every 5-10 years (Priority Four).  Appendix A1 

presents the definitions of Declared Rare and the four Priority ratings under the Wildlife Conservation 



Act 1950 [WA], defined by the Department of Environment and Conservation (2009a). 

 

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 [Commonwealth] lists Threatened 



Flora species which are considered of national environmental significance (Department of 

Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2009a).  A person must not take an action that has, will 

have, or is likely to have a significant impact on a listed threatened species or an ecological community, 

without approval from the Commonwealth Minister for the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts.  

Appendix A2 presents the definitions of the categories of Threatened Flora Species, defined by the 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 [Commonwealth]. 

 

 



 

 

 

5



 

 



 

RRL0902/093/09 

 

M

ATTISKE 



C

ONSULTING 

P

TY 


L

TD

 



 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə