Flora unit



Yüklə 44.2 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix11.08.2017
ölçüsü44.2 Kb.

FLORA UNIT 

 

 

The  flora  of  Mauritius  consists  of  about  691  species  of  plants  out  of  which  273  species  are 

endemic  to  the  island,  which  means  they  are  found  nowhere  else  in  the  world  and  about  150 

species are shared with other islands of the Mascarene Archipelago; Reunion and Rodrigues. A 

high proportion of these native species (80%) are considered threatened according to the IUCN 

Red  List  criteria.  96  species  are  known  from  less  than  50  individuals  and  forty  of  these  are 

known  from  less  than  10  individuals  in  the  wild.  The 

International  Union  for  Conservation  of 

Nature

 (IUCN - 



www.iucn.org

) has quoted Mauritius as having the third most threatened island 

flora in the world, after Hawaii and the Canary Islands.



 

The flora unit at NPCS is responsible for the conservation and management of the native flora. 



History of native flora in Mauritius 

When  Mauritius  was  first  visited  in  the  17th  century,  it  was  covered  by  dense  vegetation. 

Following  colonization,  the  forests  of  Mauritius  have  been  cleared  for  agriculture,  forestry, 

villages and towns, and other developments. Today good quality native forests occupy less than 

2.0 % of our total area. These forests are found on mountain ridges, on the Offshore Islets and in 

Black  River  Gorges  and  Bras  D’  Eau  National  Parks.  These  forest  remnants  provide  the  last 

habitats for our endemic flora and fauna. 

Our remaining native forests are under constant  threat  of  alien invasive  plants  such as  Chinese 

guava  (Psidium  cattleianum),  privet  (Ligustrum  robustum)  and  ravenale  (Ravenala 

madagascariensis).  These  exotic  plants  compete  with  the  native  species  for  space,  light  and 

nutrients.  Introduced  animals  also  contribute  significantly  to  the  degradation  process  either  by 

physically  damaging  the  plants  or  helping  in  the  dispersion  of  the  seeds  of  the  exotic  plants. 

Herbivorous mammals such as the rusa deer (Cervus timorensis) and the hare (Lepus nigricollis

browse  young  plants  and  tender  shoots.  Monkeys  (Macaca  fascicularis)  selectively  destroy 

flowers  and  fruits  as  well  as  foliage,  wild  pigs  (Sus  scrofa)  cause  extensive  damage  by  eating 

Contact Details: Mr. S. Gopal  

Tel No.:  

464-4053 / 5251-1981

 

Email: 



vgopal@govmu.org

 / 


svsgopal@gmail.com

 

 



 

 

 



roots of plants and disturbing the soil, and rats eat the ripe fruit. Red whiskered bulbul and wild 

pigs disperse the seeds of the Chinese guava. 

Some beautiful plants of our national heritage include: 

 



Boucle d’oreille / Trochetia boutoniana 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Found  only  on  the  flanks  of  Le  Morne  Brabant,  it  was  declared  as  the  National  Flower  on  12 

March 1992. The red bell-shaped flowers contain coloured nectar  and are pollinated by  geckos 

(lizard) & grey white eye (pic pics). 

 



 

 Fleur de Lys / Crinum mauritianum 

 

The Crinum mauritianum is a herbaceous plant and is endemic to Mauritius. It was believed to 

be extinct in the wild, but was rediscovered in 1973, near Midlands Dam (Barrage de Midlands). 

Due to its white flowers, it has become an ornamental in Mauritius, and it is frequently used in 

landscaping. 

 

 



 

 


 

Bois dentelle / Elaeocarpus bojeri 

 

Bois dentelle is a beautiful shrub tree, found in high cloud forest on the island of Mauritius.  



The  species  has  no  commercial  value.  Only  two  populations  of  this  plant  species  are  left  in 

Mauritius.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Bois bouquet banané / Ochna mauritiana 

 

This species are native to tropical woodlands of Africa, the Mascarenes and Asia. The name of 



this  genus  comes  from  the  Greek  word  Ochne,  used  by  Homer  and  meaning  wild  pear,  as  the 

leaves are similar in appearance. These plants are widely cultivated as decorative plants. 



 

Ex-situ conservation of native plants of Mauritius 

The Native Plant Propagation Centre (NPPC) is the main ex-situ facility for the conservation of 

the native flora of Republic of Mauritius.  It has been set up in 1996 at Robinson Road, Curepipe 

to  provide necessary facilities for the propagation of threatened native plant  species, ferns,  and 

orchids  together  with  a  collection  of  native  plants  in  an  Arboretum.   It  comprises  of  the 

following amenities:- 

 

 

 



Figure 1: Green House

 

 

The greenhouse  is  a structure covered with  glass that allows sufficient  sunlight  to  enter for the 



purpose  of  growing  plants.  At  NPPC  the  greenhouse  consists  of  three  departments  namely 

preparation room, mist chamber & weaning chamber.  

 

Propagation  of  threatened  plants  is  carried  out  both  sexually  by  seeds  and  vegetatively  by 



cuttings, spores and bulbils using specific techniques. 

 

During the past ,native plants had been successfully propagated and which include some of the 



most endangered species such Helichrysum caepitosum, Pandanus prostates, Syzygium guehoii, 

Cyphostemma  mappia,  Eugenia  tinnifolia,   Terminalia  bentzoe,  Ficus  densifolia,  Pandanus 

macrostigma, Pandanus pyramidalis, Pilea laevicaulis, Stilingea lineate, Hyophorbe vaughanii, 

Urena lobata, Badula sieberi, and chionanthus bromeana. 

 

 



Figure 2: Shade House

 

In  the  shade  house,  hardening  process  is  achieved.  This  process  enables  the  plants  resist  harsh 

conditions such as water stress & scorching sun.   

 

 



 

Figure 3: Fernery Unit

 

 


The  fernery  unit  comprises  of  a  fern  laboratory  &  a  collection  of  several  species  of 

pteridophytes  &  orchid  species.  Propagation  of  ferns  are  carried  out  in  the  fern  lab  through 

spores & bulbils.  

 

Figure 4: Arboretum 

The arboretum acts as a field gene bank where endemic plants of Mauritius are growth along 

with a medicinal corner. It is also use to create awareness among  public and for educational 

purposes. 

 

Conservation Management Area (CMA)  

CMAs are actively managed plots which have been set up in Black River Gorges National Park in a bid to 

preserve our different vegetation types. Some of these plots have been fenced so as to exclude deer and 

wild pigs. All the exotic invasive weeds (e.g., Chinese guava, privet, and liane cerf) have been removed to 

allow natural regeneration of the native forests. 

The  network of  13  CMAs covers 85  hectares  and  encompasses  all of  the main  forest. The  forest  area 

under active management is being continually enlarged to help protect native species in situ. 

 

List of fenced CMAs



  

Petrin CMA  



Petrin Extension 

Mare Longue CMA 

Florin CMA 

Macchabée CMA 

Brise Fer CMA 

Morne Seche CMA 

Fixon CMA 

Bellouguet CMA 

Bel Ombre CMA 

Mt Cocotte CMA 



 

List of non-fenced restoration areas 

Wiehe plot 

Mare aux Joncs 

Plaine Paul 

Fixon extension 

Wiolab- Plateau Remousse 

Plaine Champagne 

Mare longue extension 

 

Protected Area Network (PAN) Project 

 



This  project  is  about  expansion  and  ensuring  effective  management  of  the  protected  area 

network both in public and private sector to safeguard threatened biodiversity. The Government 

has  the  firm  intention  to  protect  the  remaining  biodiversity  in  areas  which  have  not  been 

monitored  and  surveyed.  It  is  funded  by  UNDP/GEF,  Government  of  Mauritius,  private  sector 

and ONG. 

 



The project objectives seek to strengthen the institutional and operational capacity to: 

1.

 



Identify,  prioritize  and  target  gaps  in  private  and  state  owned  lands  for  protected  area 

expansion and conservation. 



2.

 

Develop  regulatory  drivers  and  incentive  framework to  support  protected  area  expansion  and 



conservation on private and state owned lands. 

3.

 



Cost effectively mitigates the threats and pressures on the unique biodiversity in the protected 

area network. 

4.

 

To ensure  better integration of the protected area network into the country’s socio economic 



development  priorities  in  particular  ecotourism  activities  to  ensure  its  long  term  financial 

sustainability. 

5.

 

Involvement of relevant stakeholders in the implementation of the project. 



At the end of the project the following targets are set: 

1.

 



The protected area network is targeted to be increased from 8,027 ha to 14,920 ha.  

2.

 



More than 400 ha of degraded forests will be cleared from invasive and restored with native in 

the next 5 years. 

3.

 

This project will help to propose attractive incentives to the private sector so that they can take 



care of their forests and control of alien invasive species could be sustained at a national level. 

4.

 



It will also encourage research on better cost effective strategies for the control of alien invasive 

species  which  as  you  are  all  aware  is  one  of  the  important  threats  to  Mauritian  native 

biodiversity. 

 

Maintenance Weeding

 

All CMA’s and newly weeded areas have been maintained by the contract labourers working on 



Protected Area Network (PAN) project.  

 

 



Figure 5: Area with invasive alien species

 

Figure 6: Workers weeding the CMA

 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə