Floristic diversity assessment in salgala forest reserve, sri lanka



Yüklə 106.77 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü106.77 Kb.

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

FLORISTIC DIVERSITY ASSESSMENT IN SALGALA 

FOREST RESERVE, SRI LANKA 

 

C.M.K.N.K.Chandrasekara 

 

Department of Geography, University of Colombo. 

Email: kanchana@geo.cmb.ac.lk 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Sri  Lanka  is  relatively  a  small  island  in  size  with  only  65,610  km

2

  of  land  and  its 



Physical  Geography  is  highly  varied,  resulting  in  a  unique  and  very  significant 

diversity  in  faunal  and  floral  species.  Vegetation  analyses  have  recognized  fifteen 

different  floristic  regions  (Figure-1)  within  the  country  (Aston  and  Gunathilleke, 

1987) having 3360 plants species belonging to 1070 genera and 180 families (Peeris, 

1975). A remarkable feature in floristic diversity seen in Sri Lanka is that, 90% of its 

endemic species are confined to the rain forests found in the west zone, having a land 

area  of  15000km

2

.  It  is  a  reflection  of  the  island's  separation  from  the  Indian 



subcontinent. 

Although,  the  south  western  part  of  the  island  represents  a  significant  diversity  in 

flora, a large proportion  is also found in that region in wet zone of the island. Thus, 

human activities altered the areas covered by forests since historic periods 

through their multiple activities, include  agriculture, livestock, industry, living space 

and  recreation  etc.  The  human  activities  and  practices  undertaken  in  converting 

natural forests exert a definite impact on the fragmentation of large forest areas and it 

has  been  decreased  significantly  in  last  few  decades.  Transformation  into  secondary 

forests and isolated plots duly has raised an adverse impact on the floristic richness in 

the  island  to  a  grater  degree.  Especially  the  extensive  deforestation  in  the  wet  zone 

has put most of endemic species top in the extinction list. 

Therefore,  an  assessment  floristic  diversity  and  analysis  of  vegetation



 

of  these 

isolated forests found in the wet zone has been identified as a fact of great importance 

and  a  needy  investigation.  Exploration  of  Salgala  forest  reserve,  which  is  in  fact  an 

isolated  floristic  patch,  would  be  of  great  help  to  disclose  the  phytosociological 

information and phytogeographical distribution, which were never been explored and 

made  known  so  far.  The  richness  of  information  and  understanding  of  a  particular 

ecosystem  helps  to  extend  innovative  and  environmental  friendly  planning  and 

development strategies.  

 

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 

Several problems arise with regard to the floristic diversity and types of vegetation in 

an  isolated  forest  patch.  First,  the  type  of  floral  species  in  that  forest,  second  what 

would be the abundance species in the forest, third the nature of the floristic diversity 


 

and  its  spatial  distribution,  fourth  what  are  the  uses  and  advantages  of  forest,  what 



would  be  the  major  consequences  and  threats  in  conservation  of  the  forest.  In  this 

study,  an  attempt  was  made  to  address  the  first  of  these  problems.  Therefore,  the 

objective of the study was to 

i)

 



Collect the phytosociological data of the forest reserve 

ii)


 

Find out the abundance species of the forest 

iii)

 

Identify the spatial differences of floristic diversity of the forest. 



 

Figure-1: Floristic regions of Sri Lanka 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

STUDY AREA 

Salgala forest reserve encompassing an extent of 127.8ha is located at Galapitamada 

area in the Kegalle district Sri Lanka. 

T

he forest is located between 7



6' 48''and 7

0

 7' 


84'' latitude N and 80

0

 14' 65'' and 80



0

 15' 48''longitude E. (Figure-2) It was named as 

a forest reserve in 1817.  

Mean  elevation  of  the  study  area  is  250  m  and  there  are  two  small  hills  more  than 

320m  in  height  in  the  central  and  the  southern  parts  of  the  forest.  The  maximum 

height of the study area is about 330m while the lowest is about 100m. The slope of 

the  terrain  varied  between  5%-45%  and  relatively  a  steep  slope  can  be  seen  in 

southern part. The rock type was Highland series (Coorey P.G, 1964) and major soil 

type  in  the  area  is  Red  Yellow  Podsolic  (Panabokke  C.R,  1967).  Average  annual 

rainfall  is  2000mm-4000mm.  Mean  annual  temperature  fluctuates  between  25oC  – 

27oC which are typical climatic features of the “wet zone”. Over 75% of surrounding 

area  of  the  forest,  is  covered  by  Rubber,  home  gardens  and  paddy  revealing  the 

potentiality of human influence to the forest reserve. 

Source: Gunathileke I.A.U.N and Gunathileke C.V.S, 1990 

 


 

Figure-2: Location of Salgala Forest reserve



 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

METHODOLOGY 

The study is basically depending on primary data collected by a field survey. 

The forest area was divided into three main zones; north, central and south according 

to the density of the forest based on the interpretation of a 1:5000 aerial photograph. 

Vegetation  sampling  was  carried  out  in  three  transects  within  each  zone.  (Figure-4 

and Table-1) Located sample size is 10m X 10m and the gap between each contiguous 

samples were 200m. 19samples were selected maintaining topographic heterogeneity. 

Over 10cm girth at breast height (GBH) trees were enumerated. 

Following phytosociological data from each sample were collected 

 



 

Number of species. 

 

Local name of the species. 



 

Scientific name of the species. 



 

Endemic species 



 

Family. 



 

Life form of the species. 



 

Diameter at the breast height of each species.  



The  Shannon  diversity  index  was  calculated  to  find  out  the  species  and  endemic 

species  diversity  and  family  diversity.  Abundance  diversity  index  was  calculated  to 

identify  the  abundance  species  and  abundance  families  in  the  forest.  A  principal 

component analysis was done to explore the spatial differences and phytosociological 

factors affecting the spatial variation of floristic diversity in the forest. 

Alpitiya


Welhella

Salgala


Talawatta

Pahala mainoluwa



Salgala Forest

N

Salgala Forest Area 

Sri Lanka 


 

Figure- 4: Flow diagram for preparation of  base map for the field survey 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Table -1: Details of vegetation transects 



 

ransect 


Number of Samples 

North 


Central 

South 


06 

09 


04 

Total 


19 

  

 



 

RESULTS AND DICUSSIONS 

Total number of 886 tree individuals over 10cm GBH were enumerated. A total of 51 

species, 29 families and 22 endemic species were recorded. (Table-2) 

Enlarged Aerial photo 

scale1:5000 

Manual Interpretation  

Base map of the study area for the 

field survey 

1:5000 

Inputs 


Process 

Output 


Geo-referencing 

Classification of  the 

forest area according to 

the density 

Location of transects and 

Samples 


(10mX10m)

 


 

Table-2: Phytosociological data of the forest 



Local name (sinhala) 

Scientific name 

Family of Species 

1.

 



Welipiyanna* (Z

1

 & Z



2

2.



 

Dun* (Z


1

 & Z


2

3.



 

Nataw (Z


1

 & Z


2

4.



 

Naa* (Z


2

5.



 

Kirihimbiliya*(Z

1

 & Z


2

6.



 

Arankebella (Z

1

 & Z


2

7.



 

Wal jambu (Z

1

 & Z


2

8.



 

Diyataliya* (Z

1

 & Z


2

9.



 

Kekuna* (Z

1

 & Z


2

10.



 

Kadumberiya*(Z

1

 & Z


2

11.



 

Wal rambutan*(Z

1

& Z


2

12.



 

Hakarilla (Z

1

 & Z


2

13.



 

Eipetta (Z

1

 & Z


2

14.



 

Badulla* (Z

1

 & Z


2

15.



 

Wal del* (Z

1

 & Z


2

16.



 

Mal laulu* (Z

1



17.



 

Hampolanda* (Z

1

 & Z


2

18.



 

Pelan* (Z

1

 & Z


2

19.



 

Mahogani (Z

1

 & Z


2

20.



 

Path keala* (Z

1

 & Z


2

21.



 

Hema (Z


2

22.



 

Galkaranda  (Z

1

 & Z


2

23.



 

Hora* (Z


1

 & Z


2

24.



 

Dawata (Z

1

 & Z


2

25.



 

Malabada (Z

1

 & Z


2

26.



 

Goda para* (Z

1

 & Z


2

27.



 

Kahapenela (Z

1

 & Z


2

28.



 

Etamba*  (Z

1

 & Z


2

29.



 

Hedawaka (Z

1

 & Z


2

30.



 

Domba (Z


1

31.



 

Dambu (Z


1

32.



 

Makulu (Z

1



33.



 

Kitul (Z


1

34.



 

Bokera (Z

1



35.



 

Milla (Z


1

36.



 

Wal duriyan (Z

1



37.



 

Hal* (Z


1

38.



 

Mal kera* (Z

1



39.



 

Mee (Z


1

 & Z


2

40.



 

Kiriwalla* (Z

1

 & Z


2

41.



 

Aaridda* (Z

1



42.



 

Muna mal (Z

1

 & Z


2

43.



 

Ruk* (Z


1

44.



 

Hawarinuga (Z

2



45.



 

Kenda (Z


1

 & Z


2

46.



 

Balu nakutu (Z

1

 & Z


2

47.



 

Baludan (Z

1



48.



 

Goraka (Z

1



49.



 

Kurundu (Z

1

 & Z


2

50.



 

Katu kela (Z

2



51.



 

Ankenda (Z

2



Anisophyllea cinnamoides 



Doona congestiflora 

Xylopia parvifolia 

Mesua ferrea 

Palaquium pauciflorum 

Aporosa lindleyana 

Syzygium spissum 

Mastixin tetranadra 

Canarium zeylanicum 

Diospyros attenuate 

Ptychopyxis thwaitesii 

Solanum erianthum 

Cyathocalyx zeylanicus 

Semecarpus nigroviridis 

Artocarpus nobilis 

Enicosanthum acuminate 

Terminalina parviflra 

Putranjiva zeylenica 

Swietenia macrophylla 

Bridella moonii 

Tetrameles nudiflora 

Hamboldtia laurifolia 

Dipterocarpus Zeylanicus 

Carallia brachiata 

Myristica dactyloides 

Dillenia retusa 

Sapindus trifoliatus 

Mangifera Zeylanica 

Chaetocarpus castanocarpus 

Calophyllum Inophyllum 

Syzygium gardneri 

Hydnocarpus venerate 

Caryota urens 

Ochna lanceolata 

Vitex pinnata 

Cullenia ceylanica 

Vateria capallifera 

Ochana squarrosa 

Madhuca longifolia 

Holarrhena mitis 

Camphosperma zeylanica 

Mimusops elengi 

Horsfieldia iryaghedhi 

Alstonia macrophylla 

Macaranga peltata 

Stachytaepheta indica 

Aridisia humilis 

Garcinia quaesita 

Cinnamomum zeylanicum 

Erythrina fusca 

Acronychia pedunculata 

RHIZOPHORACEAE 

DIPTEROCARPACEAE 

ANNONACEAE 

GUTTIFERAE 

SAPOTACEAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

MYRTACEAE 

CORNACOAE 

BURSERACEAE 

EBENACAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

SOLANACEA 

ANNONACEAE 

ANACARDIACEAE 

MORACEAE 

ANNONACEAE 

COMBRETACEAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

MELIACEAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

DATISCACEAE 

LEGUMINOSAE 

DIPTEROCARPACEAE 

RHIZOPHORACEAE 

MYRISTICACEAE 

DILLENIACEAE 

SAPINDACEAE 

ANACARDIACEAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

GUTTIFERAE 

MYRTACEAE 

FLACOURTIACEAE 

PALMAE 


OCHNACEAE 

VERBENACEAE 

BOMBACACEAE 

DIPTEROCARPACEAE 

OCHNACEAE 

SAPOTACEAE 

APOCYNACEAE 

ANACARDIACEAE 

SAPOTACEAE 

MYRISTICACEAE 

APOCYNACEAE 

EUPHORBIACEAE 

VERBENACEAE 

MYRINACEAE 

GUTTIFERAE 

LAURACEAE 

LEGUMINOSAE 

RUTACEAE 

(Z

1

) – Could be only seen in Zone-1 



(Z

2

) - Could be only seen in Zone-1 



(Z

1

 & Z



2

) – Could be seen in both Zone-1 and Zone-1  * - Endemic species 

 

 


 

Table-3: Data on floristic families, species and endemic species at different levels of  



               elevations.  

Elevation 

(m) 

Species * 



Endemic Species ** 

Family ***  

Number 



Number 



Number 


181-220 


26 

51 


14 

64 


17 

59 


221-260 

37 


73 

15 


68 

26 


90 

261-300 


38 

75 


18 

82 


26 

90 


301-340 

29 


57 

13 


59 

21 


72 

*      Based on total number of species 51 

**    Based on total number of endemic species 22 

***  Based on total number of families 29 

 

A large number of species could be seen within the elevations of 221 – 260 m and 261 



– 300 m, which were 37 (73%) and 38 (75%) respectively. Relatively lower number 

of  species  were  identified  at  the  elevation  of  181  –  220  m.  Mastixin  tetrandra  and 



Semecarpus nigroviridis were represent 58% of the species (Table-3). 

The  largest  number  of  endemic  species  were  seen  at  the  elevation  of  261  –  300  m 

where 18 (82%) out of a total 22 endemic species were recognized. Other elevations 

were nourished with relatively lower percentage of endemic species. (Table-3) 

Both 221 – 260 m and 261 – 300 m elevations claim for highest number of families, 

each  area  containing  26  (90%)  out  of  a  total  of  29  families.  A  fever  number  of 

floristic families 17 (59%) out of 29 were identified at the elevation of 181 – 220 m, 

compared to the other elevations.(Table-3) 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure Distribution of the floristic diversity of 

Salgala forest reserve 

Zone-1 


Zone-2 

Rock 


Rainfall 4000mm 

Contours 

Samples 

 

Based on Field survey and GIS, 



2003 

 

SPATIAL DIFFERENCES OF FLORISTIC DIVERSITY OF THE FOREST 

A rich floristic diversity could be seen in the zone-1 (Z

1

) (Figure-3). Total number of 



46 species were identified in Z

1

. 15 of the species out of 48 were restricted to the Z



1. 

There were 23 endemic species and 6 were confined to Z

1. 

There were 27 families in 



Z

and  5  families  were  confined  to  the  area.  Aporosa  lindleyana  was  the  most 



common species that could identified in Z

1



Low floristic diversity could be seen in the zone-2 (Z

2

) (Figure-3). Total number of 37 



species were identified in Z

2. 


5 of the species out of 37 were restricted to the Z

2

. There 



were 18 endemic species and 1 was confined to Z

2. 


There were 24 families in zone-2 

and  2  families  were  confined  to  the  area.  Hamboldtia  laurifolia  was  the  most 

abundant species type in the Z

2. 


 

CONCLUSION  

The best floristic richness could be seen at the elevation area of 221 – 260 m and  261 

– 300 m. The least floristic richness could be seen at the area of 181 – 220 m.  

The  forest  area  could  be  classified  into  two  major  zones  based  on  the  Principal 

Component Analysis method. Highly rich floristic diversity could be find out in Zone-

1 while relatively a low floristic diversity revealed in Zone-2.  

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

I  am  greatly  indebted  to  Mr.  H.K.N.Karunarathne  my  supervisor  -final  year  thesis, 

whose encouragement, guidance and support from the initial to the final level of this 

exercise and his dedication in teaching. 

 

REFERENCES 

Alder.  D  &  Synnott.  T.J,  1992,  Permanent  sample  plot  techniques  for  mixed  tropical  forests,  Oxford 

forestry institute. 

Ashton P.S and Gunatileke C.V.S, 1987, New light on the plant Geography of Cylon, The ecological 

biogreography of the lowland endemic tree flora, Journal of biogeography. 

Gunatlleke  C.V.S,1985,  National  Forest  of  the  Wet  Zone,  their  present  status  &  Importance  to  Sri 



Lanka, The Ceylon forester, Vol xvii, Sri Lanka Forest Department 

Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N. and C. V. S. Gunatilleke. 1983. Conser- vation of natural forests of Sri Lanka. 

Sri Lanka Forester 14(1&2):39-56. Conservation. 

Gunathileke  I.A.U.N  and  Gunathileke  C.V.S,  1990,  Distribution  of  floristic  richness  and  its 

conservation in Sri Lanka, Conservation biology, Vol-4, No-1, Blackwell publishing,  

http://www.jstor.org/stable/2385959 .Accessed: 24/11/2011 01:33 

Kostermans A.J.G.H, 1992, A Hand book of the Dipterocarpaceae of Sri Lanka, The wildlife Heritage 

Trust of Sri Lanka 

Panabokke  C.R,  1967,  Soil  science,  the  soils  of  Ceylon  and  use  of  Fertilizer,  Metro  printes  ltd,  19, 

Austin place, Colombo-8 

Peeris,  C.  V.  S.  1975.  The  ecology  of  the  endemic  tree  species  of  Sri  Lanka  in  relation  to  their 

conservation, University of Aberdeen, U.K 

Weerasooriya  R.D,  Sanansiri  A,  Pushpakumara  H,Jayarathne  P  ,2002,  Biological  diversity  & 

conservation Strategy Kurulu- Kele, Sri Lanka environment exploration Society. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə