Floristic Richness and the Conservation Value of Tropical Montane Cloud Forests of Dothalugala Man and Biosphere Reserve, Sri Lanka



Yüklə 325.12 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü325.12 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Ceylon Journal of Science (Bio. Sci.) 42 (2): 55-70, 2013 

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4038/cjsbs.v42i2.6609 

*Corresponding author’s email: sumithekanayake@yahoo.com 

 

Floristic Richness and the Conservation Value of Tropical Montane 



Cloud Forests of Dothalugala Man and Biosphere Reserve, Sri Lanka 

 

E. M. S. Ekanayake

1, 2, 3

*, D. S. A. Wijesundara

2

 and G. A. D. Perera

1, 3

 

 

1



Postgraduate Institute of Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. 

2

Royal Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. 



3

Department of Botany, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. 



Accepted December 28, 2013

 

ABSTRACT 

 

Plant  species  in  Tropical  Montane  Cloud  Forests  (TMCFs)  of  Dothalugala  Man  and  Biosphere  (MAB) 

Reserve were recorded in twenty six 10 x 15 m

2

 experimental plots, aiming to reveal the total species richness 



and the richness of endemic and threatened flowering plant species in the forest canopy and the understory 

and, to find out the impacts of cardamom cultivation on the plant diversity of the study area. One hundred 

and forty eight plant species (77 tree, 46 shrub, 24 climber and one herbaceous species) belonging to 106 

plant genera and 55 plant families have been found from the area examined. A high percentage endemicity 

of plant species (50%) was revealed in this site due to the presence of 74 (38 tree, 29 shrub, 6 climber and 

one hebaceous) species endemic to Sri Lanka. Similarly, 68 out of all plant species (45.9%) and 47 out of all 

endemic plant species (63.5%) in these forests were either globally or nationally threatened. The endemic 

and ‘Critically Endangered’ Stemonoporus affinis (Dipterocarpaceae) was also found to be thrive in the area. 

Cardamom cultivation had caused a tremendous reduction in the floristic diversity (total number of species 

and the number of endemic and threatened species) and the conservation value of TMCFs in Dothalugala 

MAB reserve. Therefore, the cardamom cultivation and other related disturbances within and adjacent to 

Dothalugala MAB Reserve should be arrested for the conservation of plant diversity in this fragile ecosystem 

and, this will eventually contribute towards the conservation of biodiversity not only in Sri Lanka but also 

in the globe as a whole.   

 

Keywords:  cardamom  cultivation,  disturbances,  endemic  plants,  species  richness,  Stemonoporus  affinis

threatened plant species. 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Sri  Lanka  abounds  a  rich  plant  diversity  with 

7000  indigenous  flora  (Abeywickrama,  1986), 

including 3156 flowering plants of which 894 are 

endemic to Sri Lanka (Wijesundara et al., 2012). 

This  high  endemism  of  plant  species  and 

preceding  threats  have  led  Sri  Lanka  together 

with the Western Ghats of peninsular India to be 

considered as a biodiversity hotspot (Myers et al., 

2000). Thus, the endemic plants of Sri Lanka are 

considered  as  an  essential  element  which 

expresses  the  conservation  value  of  the  flora  of 

the  country.  However,  the  conservation  of  Sri 

Lankan  flora  has  received  much  less  attention 

than its fauna (Pethiyagoda, 2012). 

 

By  referring  to  the  Sri  Lankan  flora,  Trimen 



(1885),  an  eminent  scientist  who  pioneered 

botanical  explorations  in  Sri  Lanka,  has  stated 

that the individuality and interest of any flora lies 

mainly on its endemic species. Endemic plants of 

Sri  Lanka  appear  to  be  distributed  unequally 

across plant families as well as over space. Some 

plant  families  such  as  Balsaminaceae  and 

Lauraceae  contain  many  endemic  species. 

Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs) which 

are characterized by the presence of persistent or 

frequent  wind-driven  clouds  (Hamilton  et  al., 

1995)  are  always  reputed  for  their  high 

endemicity (Gentry, 1993; Ledo et al., 2009). For 

instance, five  sixths of the  Sri  Lanka’s endemic 

plants are reported to be included among the hill 

flora (Trimen, 1885).  

 

Although TMCFs extend over less than 1% of the 



total land area of Sri Lanka (IUCN, 2007), these 

constitute  many  plants  that  are  endemic  to  the 

country. As reported by Ranasinghe et al. (2006), 

more than 50% of the residing species in TMCFs 

are  endemic  to  the  country.  Tropical  Montane 

Cloud Forests in the world are not different from 

those in Sri Lanka either. These cover about 1.6% 

of the total area of tropical mountain forests in the 

world  (Kapos  et  al.,  2000)  and  possess  distinct 

biological communities and high levels of species 



56                                                                          Ekanayake et al.     

                                                              

endemism  and  biodiversity  (e.g.  Gentry,  1993; 

Ledo et al., 2009).  

 

In  many parts of the  world, the flora of TMCFs 



has  received  poor  attention  from  scientists  (e.g. 

Kumaran et al., 2010) though the factors affecting 

the  formation  of  cloud  forests  and  the  TMCF 

climate  had  decorously  been  explained  (e.g

Bruijnzeel  and  Veneklaas,  1998;  Grubb,  1971; 

Grubb and Whitmore, 1965, 1966).  The fate of 

TMCFs  in  relation  to  the  changing  climate  has 

recently been receiving the attention of scientists 

(Foster,  2001;  Loope  and  Giambelluca,  1998; 

Still  et  al.,  1999).  In  Sri  Lanka,  many  of  the 

research work conducted in mountain regions of 

the country were related to the identification and 

classification of forest types, to describe the forest 

structure  or  to  explain  the  forest  climate  (e.g

Balasubramaniam,  1988;  Broun,  1900;  de 

Rosayro, 1958; Gaussen et al., 1968; Greller and 

Balasubramaniam,  1980;  Koelmeyer,  1957; 

Perera,  1975;  Vincent,  1883;  Werner,  1982). 

However,  the  high  conservation  value  of  Sri 

Lankan  TMCFs  due  to  the  presence  of  endemic 

plant species has been acknowledged by several 

scientists  (e.g.  Green  and  Jayasuriya,  1996; 

Jayasuriya  et  al.,  1988;  Rathnayake,  1994; 

Wijesundara, 1991).  Much of this work appears 

to  be  based  on  field  surveys.  However,  some 

quantitative  studies  had  also  been  conducted  in 

different places, viz., Corbert’s Gap and Rangala 

of the Knuckles massif (Jayasuriya et al., 1988), 

Agra Bopath and some parts of the Kelani valley 

forest of the Peak Wilderness area (Nisbet, 1961), 

Hakgala  Strict  Nature  Reserve  (Rathnayake  and 

Jayasekara,  1998;  Wijesundara,  1991)  and 

Thangappuwa  and  Kalupahana  of  the  Knuckles 

massif (Rathnayake, 1994). 

 

 All  over  the  world,  the  number  of  species 



threatened  with  extinction  far  exceeds  the 

conservation  resources  available  and  this 

situation appears to be becoming worse (Myers et 

al., 2000). Frequent disturbances and subsequent 

diminishing  of  the  forest  cover,  especially  in 

ecologically  sensitive  areas  may  have  led  many 

plant  species  to  be  extinct  from  the  earth. 

Conversion  of  forests  to  agricultural  land,  fuel 

wood  extraction  (Sarmiento,  1995),  illegal 

logging  (Aubad  et  al.,  2008)  and  human 

population densities and trends (Young and León, 

1995) have been cited as major threats to TMCFs, 

leading  to  their  fragmentation  or  disappearance. 

Thus, in Sri Lanka, 3,000 ha of montane forests 

are  left  in  the  island  at  present  (Wijesundara, 

2012).  In  the  Knuckles  region  of  Sri  Lanka, 

cardamom cultivation has clearly been identified 

as  a  major  cause  towards  the  destruction  of 

forested  land,  leading  to  the  loss  of  biodiversity 

and increased soil erosion (Gunawardana, 2003) 

and, reduction in the total species richness and the 

richness of endemic plant species (Adikaram and 

Perera,  2005).  In  addition,  many  plant  species 

endemic  to  Sri  Lanka  have  been  assessed  as 

threatened  by  the  IUCN’s  Red  Listing  process 

(The National Red List of Flora and Fauna of Sri 

Lanka,  2012).  In  light  of  this,  as  many  as  61 

endemic  flowering  plant  species  (including  23 

trees) in Sri Lanka had not been  recorded in the 

preceding 

50 


years 

(Pethiyagoda, 

2012) 

presumably due to their extinction from the wild.  



 

Diverse  climatic  conditions,  which  resulted  due 

to high geographical heterogeneity as well as due 

to its positioning in the Sri Lankan terrain, have 

led the Knuckles massif to possess a wide range 

of  rainfall  and  temperature  regimes  (Cooray, 

1998;  Legg,  1995).  These  may  have  potentially 

paved  the  path  for  the  area  to  harbor  a  rich 

biodiversity 

with 


high 


percentage 

of 


endemicity. 

Being 


located 

at 


unique 


environment, TMCFs at Dothalugala may possess 

many  more  endemic  plants  too.  A  detailed 

quantitative survey in the forests of Dothalugala 

MAB  Reserve  area  was  therefore  conducted. 

However,  the  current  paper  evaluates  only  the 

plant  species  taller  than  1  m  recorded  in  the 

experimental  plots  established,  to  reveal  the 

floristic richness and the endemic and threatened 

plant species under different life form categories. 

This study also assesses the impacts of cardamom 

cultivation  on  the  examined  floristic  features  of 

TMCFs. The objective of this article is to provide 

status quo report of the floristic richness and the 

conservation  importance  of  the  flora  of  the 

Reserve, but not to explain the spatial patterns of 

species abundances. 



 

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Study site 

The  Knuckles  massif  of  Sri  Lanka  is  situated 

north of the central highlands of the country, as an 

isolated mountain range which is separated from 

the  main  highlands  by  the  Dumbara  valley. 

Dothalugala  MAB  Reserve  extends  over  the 

southern and south eastern parts of the Knuckles 

Conservation Region (7

o

  17’–  7



o

  21’ N  and 80

o

 

49’– 80



o

 57’ E) (Fig. 1). The presence of ‘Dothalu 

trees’ (Loxococcus rupicola, Family: Arecaceae) 

which is endemic  to Sri  Lanka  has led to  name 

this area as Dothalugala by the local people (Fig. 

2). 


 

                                 Floristic Features of TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve, Sri Lanka                      57 

 

 



 

Figure 1. Location of the Knuckles mountain range in relation to the Kandy (K) and Matale (M) Districts of 

Sri Lanka and the location of the study area (Source: 1:50,000 map of the Survey Department of Sri Lanka).



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2. A juvenile Dothalu (Loxococcus rupicola) tree in the Dothalugala forest (the palm tree at the center 

of the photograph). 

 





58                                                                          Ekanayake et al.     

                                                              

The  Dothalugala  Man  and  Biosphere  Reserve 

extends  over  1620  ha  area  (Bharathie,  1989).  It 

consists  of  three  peaks,  namely  Dothalugala 

(1558  m),  Nawanagala  (1420  m)  and 

Kobonillagala  (1545  m).  As  stated  by  Cooray 

(1998),  the  average  annual  rainfall  varies  from 

about 2540 mm on the Eastern side to 3810-5080 

mm  on  the  main  Knuckles  range.  Both  South-

western  and  North-eastern  monsoonal  rains 

directly  influence  the  distribution  of  rainfall 

within the Knuckles massif as it is located almost 

perpendicular  to  the  direction  of  the  respective 

wind  currents  (de  Rosayro,  1958;  Legg,  1995; 

Werner, 1982). However, the lower eastern slopes 

are much drier, with less than 2000 mm of mean 

annual rainfall, most of which is received during 

the  north-east  monsoon  (October  to  January) 

(Legg,  1995).  The  mean  annual  temperature 

outside  the  massif  is  more  than  26 

o

C  and  this 



value falls down to about 21 

o

C at altitudes above 



915 m and to about 18.5 

o

C at the highest altitudes 



(Cooray,  1998).  Mountain  tops  in  the  area  are 

frequently covered with mist or fog though these 

at the eastern slope may drift away with the wind 

during the day time. 

 

Easily accessible drier parts have been disturbed 



mostly  for  cardamom  (Elettaria  cardamomum

cultivation. Cardamom is a perennial spice plant 

which has been introduced to Sri Lanka in 1805 

(Gunawardana,  2003).    The  government  has 

granted  permission  to  cultivate  cardamom  in 

forested lands on lease  and people  have  cleared 

the  understory  of  montane  forests  to  various 

extents; from 3 ha to more than 20 ha to cultivate 

cardamom  (Gunawardana,  2003).  A  few  such 

cultivated lands within the Dothalugala area have 

been abandoned 15-20 years ago and are currently 

under a natural process of vegetation succession. 

 

Sampling  

Twenty six 15 m x 10 m experimental plots were 

established at randomly chosen points in forests 

of Dothalugala MAB Reserve and the individuals 

taller than 1 m were enumerated. Among these 26 

experimental  plots,  14  were  located  on  wetter 

parts and at the ridge tops, 8 were located at the 

drier eastern slopes of the Dothalugala mountain 

range  while  4  were  located  at  abandoned 

cardamom cultivation sites at the dry face of the 

mountain  range.  Voucher  specimens  were 

collected  from  all  the  individuals  and  identified 

using standard keys, Flora and by comparing with 

those in the National Herbarium, Peradeniya. The 

endemic  and  threatened  plant  species  among 

these  were  identified  using  Floras  and  plant 

checklists.  Plants  were  categorized  as  trees, 

shrubs, climbers, herbs etc. based on the basic life 

form features. However, the ‘climber’ category in 

this study includes both woody and semi-woody 

climbing plants. 

 

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION  

 

Many  criteria  based  on  floristic  features  have 

often been used in determining the conservation 

value of wilderness areas and prioritizing habitats 

for conservation. Some of these include the total 

species  richness  (Gentry,  1992;  Trigas  et  al., 

2013), endemicity of plants (Brooks et al., 2006; 

Gentry, 1992; Trigas et al., 2013), threat status of 

candidate  species  (Redding  and  Mooers,  2006) 

and rarity of species (Margules and Usher, 1981; 

Scott et  al., 1993; Singh and Samant,  2010 and 

Usher, 1986). Total species richness per se  may 

not  truly  represent  the  conservation  value  of  a 

given area. This is because, the species richness 

can  be  driven  by  common,  widespread  species.  

(Orme et al., 2005; Lamoreux et al., 2006). The 

use  of  species  richness  in  prioritizing  habitats 

may  create  serious  conceptual  errors  due  to  its 

dependency on the size of the area sampled and 

the  sizes  of  individuals  in  each  locality.  In  this 

sense,  Hurlbert’s  (1971)  rarefaction  method 

proved to be robust to compare the plant species 

richness  among  habitats  as  the  method 

standardizes all samples to a common size. It is a 

common  belief  that  habitats  that  are  rich  in 

species for one taxon may also be species-rich for 

other  taxa  as  well  (Pearson  and  Cassola,  1992) 

and therefore, the rare species may benefit from 

the  conservation of species rich habitats (Soulé, 

1986), though this may not be equally applicable 

to  all  the  ecosystems  in  different  parts  of  the 

world (Prendergast et al., 1993).  

 

Rarity  of  species  of  a  given  site  is  also  an 



important  criterion  to  be  considered  but  this 

remains  difficult  to  quantify.  Moreover,  the 

concept  of  rarity  has  often  been  used  in  an 

ambiguous way in vegetation science by different 

authors. Some have used the term with reference 

to the frequency of occurrence while others have 

used  the  term  to  describe  the  abundance  of 

participating species (Jesús, 1998).  

 

In contrast, the degree of biotic endemism is often 



considered  as  a  major  criterion  that  is  used  in 

determining  the  conservation  units  (Gentry, 

1992).  Similarly,  the  threat  status  of  species 

which has been introduced by the IUCN (World 

Conservation Union) provides good information 

on the conservation value of species (Gärdenfors 



et al., 2001). It gives guidelines to assign species 

                                 Floristic Features of TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve, Sri Lanka                      59 

 

into  categories  of  threat,  based  on  threshold 



values of population parameters, such as range of 

occurrence and population decline (Redding and 

Mooers, 2006). Thus, it appears that it is easy and 

reasonable to describe the plant diversity and the 

conservation value of a given habitat by the total 

species richness together with the endemicity and 

the threat status of species in the site. 

 

Floristic richness and the conservation value of 

TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve 

Species richness 

One  hundred  and  forty  eight  flowering  plant 

species  belonging  to  106  genera  and  55  plant 

families  were  identified from the  examined two 

forest  strata  (Appendix  1).  Among  these,  there 

were  77  tree,  46  shrub,  24  climber  and  one 

herbaceous  species.  However,  the  species 

richness  in  the  study  site  could  be  much  higher 

than  the  recorded  if  all  plant  groups  were 

considered. This is due to the fact that epiphytic 

and  cryptogamic  plants  that  prefer  cooler  and 

wetter  environments  thrive  well  in  montane 

forests  (Jacobs,  1988;  White,  1983  and 

Whitmore, 1975).  



  

Endemic plant species  

The current study revealed a high endemicity of 

flowering  plants  at  Dothalugala  MAB  Reserve 

(Appendix  1).  Seventy  four  endemic  plants 

species of Sri Lanka were found from the forests 

and this accounts for 50% of the total number of 

plant species that reside in the area. Of these, 38 

were trees, 29 were shrubs, 6 were climbers while 

only one was a herbaceous species. Results of the 

present  study  were  comparable  with  those 

received  from  other  TMCFs  of  the  Knuckles 

massiff. For instance,  50% of the  residing plant 

species  at  Thangappuwa  were  endemic  to  Sri 

Lanka  (Rathnayaka  1994).  Further,  the 

endemicity of plants at Dothalugala forests could 

be  much  higher  if  all  the  vegetation  including 

herbaceous and epiphytic flora were included.  A 

greater  number  of  species  in  the  plant  families 

such  as  Balsaminaceae  and  Lamiaceae  are 

herbaceous and as Cramer (2006) explained these 

two are among the families which contain a high 

number of endemic plant species of the country. 

 

Out of the 74 endemic plant species, 42 (56.7%) 



were  found  to  occur  commonly  all  over  the 

Reserve.  Agrostistachys  coriacea  (Fig.  3a), 



Calophyllum  trapezifolium,  Eurya  ceylanica, 

Semecarpus  nigro-viridis,  Kendrickia  walkeri 

(Fig. 3b) and Glochidium pachycarpum (Fig. 3c) 

were some of the common endemic species found 

in the forests. In contrast, some species occurred 

less  frequently  or  were  highly  restricted  to 

specific  localities  within  the  reserve.  Such  a 

pattern appears to be common in other TMCFs as 

well.  Analysis  of  habitat  associations  of  tree 

species with respect to the terrain characteristics 

had shown that 36% of compositional variability 

in montane sites could be explained by elevation 

(Jarvis,  2001).  In  Dothalugala,  species  such  as 



Osbeckia lanata and Stemonoporus affinis thrive 

well in ridge tops while Litsea walkeriVernonia 



zeylanica and Fahrenheitia minor appear to be of 

restricted distribution and confined to drier slopes 

of the Reserve. However, no point endemics have 

been  recorded  from  the  two  forest  strata  in  the 

area explored. 

 

The endemic tree, Stemonoporus affinis (Fig. 3d) 



which  belongs  to  the  family  Dipterocarpaceae, 

was  found  to  occur  mainly  on  ridge  tops  of 

Dothalugala  MAB  Reserve.  Members  of  the 

family  Dipterocarpaceae  are  usually  reported  to 

be common in lowland humid forests which are 

normally restricted up to a height of 1200 m on 

main  mountain  ranges  and,  900  m  or  lower 

altitudes  on  isolated  mountains  of  the  Malay 

Peninsula  and  other  parts  of  South-east  Asia, 

India,  Sri  Lanka  and  in  Africa  (Greller  et  al., 

1987; Symington (1943). However, Greller et al

(1987)  stated  that  some  species  of  the  genus 



Stemonoporus  commonly  occur  above  1500  m 

and up to 1800 m in the TMCFs of Sri Lanka.  

 

Threatened plant species  

All  the  plant  species  identified  from  the  study 

area  were  evaluated  against  the  National  and 

Global Lists of threatened plants as given in the 

National  Red  List  of  Flora  and  Fauna  of  Sri 

Lanka, 2012. Among the 148 plant species found 

at  Dothalugala  MAB Reserve, 57 (38.5%)  were 

found to be nationally threatened species (Table 

1).  These include 30 tree, 18 shrub, 8 climber and 

one  herbaceous  species.  Similarly,  17  tree  and 

shrub  species  (11.5%  of  the  total  species)  that 

grow in the study area were found to be globally 

threatened  (Table  2).  However,  6  species  have 

been  included  in  both  National  and  Global  Red 

Lists. As given in Table 1, there are 11 other Near 

Threatened species as well. 

 

Two  critically  endangered  plant  species,  viz. 



Memecylon  sessile  (Melastomataceae)  and 

Stemonoporus affinis (Fig. 3d) were found from 

the  study  area.  The  shrub,  M.  sessile  is  locally 

common at Dothalugala MAB Reserve and this is 

not an endemic species. In contrast, as mentioned 

elsewhere in this article, S. affinis is endemic to 

Sri  Lanka  and  is  listed  as  a  ‘Critically 

Endangered’ species in both National and Global 

Threatened Lists.  



60                                                                          Ekanayake et al.     

                                                              

According to the National Red List of Sri Lanka, 

15  (7  tree,  6  shrub  and  2  climber)  species  of 

TMCFs  of  Dothalugala  fall  into  nationally 

‘Endangered’  category.  Of  these,  Syzygium 

caryophyllatum (Myrtaceae) is considered as an 

endangered  species  at  global  scale  too.  The 

species  appeared  to  be  restricted  to  the  drier 

eastern slopes of the  mountain range. Similarly, 

some  nationally  endangered  species  such  as 

Arundinaria debilis and Elaeocarpus hedyosmus 

were  found  to  be  restricted  to  wetter  parts  of 

Dothalugala  MAB  reserve.  In  addition,  species 

like  Osbeckia  lanata  and  Ternstroemia 



gymnanthera  appeared  to  be  confined  to  ridge 

tops  with  a  dense  cloud  cover  but  some  like 



Dioscorea  trimenii  and  Ilex  denticulata 

apparently avoided ridge tops. In contrast, several 

other  endangered  species  such  as  Cinnamomum 

litseaefolium,  Gordonia  ceylanica,  Hortonia 

floribunda,  Litsea  glaberrima,  Memecylon 

cuneatum,  Symplocos  cordifolia  (Fig.  3e)  and 

Syzygium  fergusoni  (Fig.  3f)  were  found  to  be 

thriving well throughout the study area. 

Moreover,  40  (nationally)  vulnerable  plant 

species were found in these relatively undisturbed 

forested areas (Table 1). These include 22 tree, 11 

shrub, 6 climber and 1 herbaceous species. About 

half of these exhibits a distribution spanning the 

entire study area.  Others show a more restricted 

distribution and are confined to ridge tops, wetter 

sites or to the dry slopes of the mountain range.   

 

The  current  study further revealed that  many of 



the  endemic  plant  species  found  in  the  Reserve 

area were listed as threatened either at national or 

global levels (The National Red List of Flora and 

Fauna  of  Sri  Lanka,  2012).  Among  the  74 

endemic species that were found from the natural 

forests  of  Dothalugala  MAB  reserve  area,  40 

(54%)  species  have  been  listed  as  nationally 

threatened  species  (Table  3)  while  13  (17.5%) 

have  been  listed  as  globally  threatened  species. 

Among these, 6 plant species are included in Red 

Lists at both national and global scales. 

 

 


  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə