Floristic Richness and the Conservation Value of Tropical Montane Cloud Forests of Dothalugala Man and Biosphere Reserve, Sri Lanka



Yüklə 325.12 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü325.12 Kb.
1   2   3   4

 

Table 1.  Number of  nationally  ‘Threatened’ and ‘Near Threatened’ plant species of Sri  Lanka  that  were 

found at Dothalugala MAB Reserve area as per the National Red List of Flora and Fauna of Sri Lanka, 2012 

(Species names are given in the Appendix I). 

  

 



Number of plant species 

Trees 


Shrubs 

Climbers 

Herbs 

Total 


Critically Endangered 





Endangered 



15 



Vulnerable 

22 


11 



40 

Total  no.  of  Threatened 

species 

30 


18 



57 

No.  of  Near  Threatened 

species 



11 



 

 

 

Table  2.  Number  of  globally  ‘Threatened’  plant  species  in  Dothalugala  MAB  Reserve  area  as  per  the 

National Red List of Flora and Fauna of Sri Lanka, 2012 (Species names are given in the Appendix I). 

 

 

Number of plant species 



 

Trees 


Shrubs 

Climbers 

Herbs 

Total 


Critically Endangered 





Endangered 





Vulnerable 

10 




13 

Total  no.  of  Threatened 

species 

14 




17 

 

 

 

. 



                                 Floristic Features of TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve, Sri Lanka                      61 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 3. (a) Agrostistachys coriacea (E, VU-N), (b) Kendrickia walkeri (E), (c) Glochidium pachycarpum 

(E),    (d)  Stemonoporus  affinis  (E,  CR-N,  CR-G),  (e)  Symplocos  cordifolia  (E,  VU-N,  EN-G)    and  (f) 



Syzygium fergusonii (E, VU- N, EN-G) [E - Endemic; CR - Critically Endangered; EN - Endangered; VU - 

vulnerable; N - Nationally threatened; G - Globally threatened] 



 

 

 

 

 

(a) 


(b) 

(c) 


(d) 

(e) 


(f) 

62                                                                          Ekanayake et al.     

                                                              

Table 3. Number of ‘Threatened’ and ‘Near Threatened’ endemic plant species of Sri Lanka that occur at 

Dothalugala MAB Reserve area according to the National Red List of Flora and Fauna of Sri Lanka, 2012 

(Species names are given in the Appendix I). 

 

 



Number of endemic plant species 

 

Trees 


Shrubs 

Climbers 

Herbs 

Total 


Critically Endangered 





Endangered 



11 



Vulnerable 

14 


10 



28 

Total Threatened species 

20 

15 


40 



Near Threatened species 





 

 

Impacts  of  disturbances  on  endemic  and 

threatened flora in the area 

The  floristic  features  of  abandoned  cardamom 

cultivation  lands  were  compared  with  those  of 

adjacent relatively less disturbed sites in the dry 

parts of the mountain range as given in the Table 

4.  Floristic  richness  (number  of  plant  families, 

genera, total species and species of endemic and 

threatened taxa) in secondary forests grown after 

the  abandonment  of  cardamom  cultivation  was 

lower  than  that  in  adjacent,  relatively  less 

disturbed  forests  in  the  drier  slopes  of  the 

mountain (Table 4). Nearly one third of the plant 

families and genera and half of the natural forest 

species  have  disappeared  from  the  land  as  a 

consequence  of  cardamom  cultivation. A  fewer 

number of tree and shrub species were present in 

secondary  forests  that  have  emerged  after  the 

abandonment of cardamom cultivation (Table 4). 

 

Table 4. Comparison of floristic features of TMCFs and adjacent abandoned cardamom cultivation sites at 

the dry-face of the mountain range 

 

 

Number of taxa in the two vegetation types at the 



North-eastern slope of the mountain range 

Floristic feature 

Relatively less disturbed 

natural forests (n=8) 

Abandoned cardamom 

cultivation sites (n=4) 

Plant families 

47 


30 

Plant genera 

82 

50 


Plant species 

104 


61 

Life form 

    Tree species 

    Shrub species 

    Climber species 

 

56 



31 

17 


 

32 


17 

12 


Nationally Threatened species 

    Critically Endangered 

    Endangered 

    Vulnerable 

 





29 

 



16 


Near Threatened (nationally) species 



Globally Threatened species 

    Endangered 

    Vulnerable 

 



11 

 



Endemic species 

55 

30 


Nationally Threatened endemic species 

    Endangered 

    Vulnerable 

 



22 

 



13 

Near Threatened (nationally) endemic species 



                                 Floristic Features of TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve, Sri Lanka                      63 

 

However,  it  was  evident  that  many  pioneer  or 



exotic  species  such  as  Macaranga  indica  and 

Clidemia  hirta  thrive  well  in  these  disturbed 

sites. Although the number of experimental plots 

established  in  the  two  forest  categories  were 

different, this would not much affect the pattern 

explained and any ecologist  who visits the  two 

sites can easily detect this by visual observation. 

 

Only  30  endemic  plant  species  were  found  in 



abandoned  cardamom  cultivation  sites  and 

almost all of these were widely occurring species 

in  the  study  area.  Some  other  endemic  plant 

species, most of which may need specific micro-

habitats,  did  not  occur  in  the  site  even  15-20 

years  after  the  abandonment  of  cardamom 

cultivation.  ‘Critically  Endangered’  Memecylon 

sessile  was  also  not  found  to  occur  in  these 

secondary  forests  though  the  species  was 

frequently found in relatively undisturbed natural 

forests. 

 

The results of the current study are comparable 



with a similar study carried out at Kaelaebokka, 

towards Rangala of the Knuckles massif. There, 

approximately  a  50%  reduction  of  species  was 

noticed in abandoned cardamom cultivated sites 

compared  with  the  adjacent  relatively  less 

disturbed  areas,  while  the  endemicity  of  trees 

was as low as 22%. Some nationally endangered 

plant species such as Elaeocarpus montanus and 



Gordonia 

zeylanica

globally 

vulnerable 

Antidesma  pyrifolium,  nationally  vulnerable 

Calophyllum  tomentosum  and,  many  endemic 

plant species of the country including Lasianthus 



oliganthus  and  Syzygium  micranthum  were 

absent in cardamom cultivation lands (Adikaram 

and Perera, 2005). 

 

The  decline  of  the  floristic  richness  and  the 



conservation  value  of  the  secondary  forests 

investigated  may  be  an  artifact  of  past 

disturbances  due  to  cardamom  cultivation. 

During cardamom cultivation, the understory and 

ground layers are cleared (Gunawardana, 2003) 

and  as  a  result,  many  tree,  climber  and 

herbaceous  flora  in  the  ground  and  understory 

layers are removed. Tree canopy is also damaged 

during cardamom cultivation so as to allow more 

light  to  penetrate  to  the  ground  layer 

(Gunawardana,  2003;

 

Ranawana  et  al.,  2004). 



Gunawardana  (2003)  pointed  out  that  these 

cardamom cultivation lands were also frequently 

found on the slopes of 30-70% steep terrain and 

on  stream  banks  which  were  highly 

environmentally sensitive areas situated over an 

elevation  of  1000  m.  THESE  Cardamom 

cultivation lands are frequently been cleaned and 

as  a  result,  the  soil  erosion  takes  place 

(Gunawardana,  2003).  Prolonged  cardamom 

cultivation  therefore,  proved  to  remove  many 

native  plant  species  from  the  sites  and  the 

remaining  plants  could  be  a  choice  of  the 

cardamom  growers.  At  present,  there  is  an 

increasing trend to grow plant species alien to the 

region  (e.g.  Alstonia  scholaris,  Artocarpus 

heterophyllus)  by  cardamom  growers  to  cover 

canopy gaps that have occurred due to the death 

of  native  canopy  trees.  This  salient  change  of 

species  composition  in  cardamom  cultivation 

lands  would  potentially  hasten  the  complete 

devastation  of  this  fragile  ecosystem.  It  is  true 

that  cardamom  cultivation  is  a  profitable 

industry.  However,  in  the  Knuckles  region,  the 

majority  of  those  engaged  in  cardamom 

cultivation  is  represented  by  the  elites  from 

different parts of the country whereas only a few 

local  rural  villagers  may  be  involved  in 

cardamom cultivation at small-scale. In addition, 

a  vast  majority  of  the  local  villagers  serve  as 

labourers in the cardamom industry and thus, this 

venture  would  not  much  support  the  rural 

development in the region. 

 

Concluding remarks 

The current study revealed the high plant species 

richness and high conservation value of TMCFs 

of  Dothalugala  while  reiterating  the  irreparable 

consequences  and  effects  of  cardamom 

cultivation  on  this  globally  valued  ecosystem. 

This situation is more or less the same for other 

parts  of  the  Knuckles  massif  too.  Therefore, 

measures should be taken to reassess the possible 

options  for  this  incomparable  land.  Could  we 

afford to achieve sustainable development at the 

cost  of  the  biodiversity  of  our  country?  Would 

cardamom  cultivation  in  this  environmentally 

sensitive area be a sensible option for this region? 

Would  not  the  development  of  ecotourism 

industry  in  the  Knuckles  region  with  the 

participation of local people be a better alternative 

for the  sustainable  development of the  country? 

Therefore, we firmly propose strict protection of 

this  fragile  and  invaluable  resource  through 

change of existing policies and strengthening of 

relevant institutes. 

 

 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

Financial  assistance  provided  by  the  National 

Science  Foundation,  Sri  Lanka  (Grant  No.: 

RG/2003/FR/02) and the kind permission granted 

by  the  Forest  Department  of  Sri  Lanka  for 

conducting  this  study  at  Dothalugala  MAB 

Reserve  are  gratefully  acknowledged.  Authors 


64                                                                          Ekanayake et al.     

                                                              

also wish to extent their sincere gratitude to Mr. 

B.  K.  B.  Waththegama  and  Mr.  B.  D.  C.  G. 

Priyantha of the Forest Department for providing 

facilities  during  field  activities,  Mr.  Milinda 

Bandara and Mr. Palitha Chandrasiri for helping 

in  the  field,  Ms.  Ranjani  Edirisinghe  of  the 

National  Herbarium,  Peradeniya  for  assisting  in 

the identification of plant species and Mr. Rusiru 

Hemage for assisting in preparing the map of Sri 

Lanka in the Figure 1.  

 

 

REFERENCES 

 

Abeywickrama,  B.  A.  (1986).  The  Threatened 



Plants  of  Sri  Lanka.  UNESCO  and  MAB 

National committee for Sri Lanka. Publication 

No 16. NARESA, Colombo, Sri Lanka. 

Adikaram, N. W. A. M. M. D. and Perera, G. A. 

D. (2005).  Impacts of Cardamom cultivation 

on  the  floristic  diversity  of  the  montane 

forests of the Knuckles Range. Proceedings of 

the University of Peradeniya Annual Research 

Sessions 2005, University of Peradeniya, Sri 

Lanka. 


Aubad, J., Arago´n, P., Olalla-Ta´rraga, M. A. and 

Rodríguez,  M.  A.  (2008).  Illegal  logging, 

landscape  structure  and  the  variation  of  tree 

species  richness  across  North Andean  forest 

remnants.  Forest  Ecology  and  Management 

255: 1892–1899. 

Balasubramaniam,  S.  (1988).  The  major  forest 



formation of the Knuckles region. Proceedings 

of  the  Preliminary  workshop  for  the 

preparation  of  a  conservation  plan  for  the 

Knuckles range of forest, Forest Department

Colombo, Sri Lanka. 

Bharathie,  K.  P.  S.  (1989).  Impacts  on  the 



Knuckles Range of Forest in Sri Lanka. Forest 

Department. Colombo, Sri Lanka. 

Brooks, T. M., Mittermeier, R. A., da Fonseca, G. 

A. B., Gerlach, J., Hoffmann, M., Lamoreux, 

J.  F.,  Mittermeier,  C.  G.,  Pilgrim,  J.  D.  and 

Rodrigues,  A.  S.  L.  (2006).  Global 

biodiversity  conservation  priorities.  Science 

313: 58-61. 

Broun, A. F. (1900). On the forest and waste land 

of  Ceylon.  In:  The  flora  of  Ceylon,  Hand 

book, ed. H. Triman. Royal Botanic gardens, 

Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, Volume 5: 355-363. 

Bruijnzeel,  L.  A.  and  Veneklaas,  E.  J.  (1998). 

Climatic  conditions  and  tropical  montane 

forest productivity: The fog has not lifted yet. 

Ecology 79 (1): 3-9. 

Cooray, P. G. (1998).   The  Knuckles Massif  - A 



Portfolio. Forest Department, Sri Lanka. 

de  Rosayro,  R.  A.  (1958).  The  climate  and 

vegetation of the Knuckles region of Ceylon. 

Ceylon Forester (3/4): 201-260. 

Foster, P. (2001).  The potential negative impacts 

of global climate change on tropical montane 

cloud  forests.  Earth-Science  Reviews  55  (1-

2): 73–106. 

Gärdenfors,  U.,  Hilton-Taylor,  C.,  Mace,  G.  M. 

and Rodríguez, J. P. (2001). The Application 

of IUCN Red List Criteria at Regional Levels. 



Conservation  Biology  15(5):  1206–1212. 

DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2001.00112.x 

Gaussen, H., Legris, P., Viart, M. and Labroue, L. 

(1968). Explanatory Notes on the Vegetation 



Map of Ceylon. Govt. Press, Colombo. 14.  

Gentry, A. H. (1992). Tropical forest biodiversity: 

distributional 

patterns 

and 

their 


conservational significance. Journal of Oikos 

63: 19-28. 

Gentry,  A.  H.  (1993).  Patterns  of  and  floristic 

composition  in  neotropical  montane  forests. 

Proceedings 

of 

Neotropical 

Montane 

Ecosystem Symposium, New York. 

Green, M. and Jayasooriya, M. (1996).  Lost and 

found.  Sri  Lanka’s  rare  and  endemic  plant 

revealed.  Plant Talk 18-21. 

Greller,  A.  M.,  Gunatilleke,  I.  A.  U.  N., 

Jayasuriya, A.  H.  M.,  Gunatilleke,  C.  V.  S., 

Balasubramaniam, S. and Dassanayake, M. D. 

(1987).  Stemonoporus  dominated  montane 

forests  in  the  Adam’s  Peak  Wilderness,  Sri 

Lanka.  Journal  of  Tropical  Ecology  3  (1): 

243-253. 

Greller, A. M. and Balasubramaniam, S. (1980). 

A preliminary floristic-climatic classification 

of  the  forest  of  Sri  Lanka.  The  Sri  Lanka 



Forester 14: 163-170. 

Grubb,  P.    J.  (1971).  Letter  on  interpretation  of 

the  'Massenerhebung'  effect  on  tropical 

mountains. Journal of Nature 229: 44-45.  

Grubb,  P.  J.  and  Whitmore,  J.  (1965).  A 

comparison  of  montane  and  lowland  rain 

forest in Ecudor II. The climate and its effects 

on  the  distribution  and  physiognomy  of  the 

forest. Journal of Ecology 53: 422-463. 

Grubb,  P.  J.  and  Whitmore,  T.  C.  (1966).  A 

comparison  of  montane  and  lowland  rain 

forest in Ecuador. II The climate and its effects 

on  the  distribution  and  physiognomy  of  the 

forest. Journal of Ecology 54: 303-333. 

Gunawardana,  H.  G.  (2003).  Ecological 

Implication  of  Cardamom  Cultivation  in  the 

high altitudes of Knuckles Forest Reserve, Sri 

Lanka. The Sri Lanka Forester 26: 1-9. 

Hamilton, L. S.,  Juvik, J. O.  and Scatena,  F. N. 

(1995).  Tropical  montane  cloud  forests

Ecological  Studies  (Germany),  Vol.  110. 

Springer-Verlag, New York. 

 


                                 Floristic Features of TMCFs at Dothalugala MAB Reserve, Sri Lanka                      65 

 

Hurlbert,  S.  H.  (1971).  The  non-concept  of 



species  diversity:  a  critique  and  alternative 

parameters. Ecology 52: 577-586. 

IUCN (2007). The 2007 Red List of Threatened 

Fauna  and  Flora  of  Sri  Lanka.  IUCN,  Sri 

Lanka. 

Jacobs, M. (1988). The tropical rain forest: A first 



encounter. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 295pp. 

Jarvis,  A.  J.  (2001).  Terrain  controls  on  the 



distribution  of  tree  Species  diversity  and 

structure  in  tropical  Lowland  and  tropical 

montane  forest.  A  thesis  submitted  to  the 

University  of  London  for  the  Degree  of 

Doctor  of  Philosophy,  King’s  College, 

London, U.K.  

Jayasuriya,  A.  H.  M.,  Balasubramaniam,  S., 

Greller, A. M. and Dasanayake, M. D. (1988). 



Botany  of  the  Knuckles  Mountain  Range 

(Unpublished). 

Jesús,  I.  (1998)  Types  of  rarity  of  plant 

communities.  Journal  of  Vegetation  Science 



9(5): 641–646. 

Kapos, V., Rhind, J., Edwards, M., Ravilious, C. 

and Price, M. (2000). Developing a map of the 

world’s  mountain  forests. In:  Price, M. F. & 

Butts,  N.  (Eds.)  Forests  in  Sustainable 

Mountain 

Development:  A 

State 

of 

Knowledge  Report  for  2000,  pp.  4-9.  CAB 

International, Wallingford, UK. 

Koelmeyer, K. O. (1957). Climatic classification 

and the distribution of vegetation in Ceylon. 



The Ceylon Forester (2): 144-163. 

Kumaran, S. Perumal, B., Davison, G., Ainuddin, 

A.  N.,  Lee,  M.  S.  and  Bruijnzeel,  L.  A.  

(2011).  Tropical  montane  cloud  forests  in 

Malaysia,  Current  status  of  knowledge.  In: 

Tropical Montane Cloud Forests; Science for 

Conservation and Management. International 

Hydrology  Series.  L.  A.  Bruijnzeel,  F.  N. 

Scatena,  L.  S.  Hamilton  (Eds.),  Cambridge 

University Press, U.K. 

Lamoreux, J. F., Morrison, J. C., Ricketts, T. H., 

Olson,  D.  M.,  Dinerstein,  E.,  McKnight,  M. 

W. and Shugart H. H. (2006). Global tests of 

biodiversity concordance and the importance 

of endemism. Nature 440: 212–214.  

Ledo,  A.,  Montes,  F.  and  Condes,  S.  (2009). 

Species dynamics in a montane cloud forest: 

identifying factors involved in changes in tree 

diversity  and  functional  characteristics. 

Forest Ecology and Management 2585: 575-

584. 


Legg,  C.  (1995).  A  Geographic  information 

system  for  planning  and  managing  the 

Conservation  of  tropical  forest  in  the 

Knuckles  Range.  The  Sri  Lanka  Forester

Special issue: 25 - 36. 

Loope,  L.  L.  and  Giambelluca,  T.  W.  (1998). 

Vulnerability  of  island  Tropical  Montane 

Cloud Forests to climate change, with special 

reference  to  East  Maui,  Hawaii. 

Climatic 

Change 39(2-3): 503-517.

 

Margules,  C.  and  Usher,  M.  B.  (1981).  Criteria 



used  in  assessing  wildlife  conservation 

potential:  a  review.  Biological  Conservation 


1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə