Forest Dieback at Horton Plains, Sri Lanka: The Potential Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae in Enhancing the Growth of the Native Tree Species



Yüklə 12.07 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü12.07 Kb.

Proceedings of the Peradeniya University Research Sessions, Sri Lanka, Vol. 16, 24

th

 November 2011



 

 

187 



Forest Dieback at Horton Plains, Sri Lanka: The Potential Role of Arbuscular 

Mycorrhizae in Enhancing the Growth of the Native Tree Species,  

Syzygium rotundifolium 

 

P.N. Yapa

1

, S. Madawala

 2

 and C.T. Bamunuarachchige



 

1

Department of Biological Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, 

Rajarata University of Sri Lanka 

2

Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya 

 

 

One  of  the  most  striking  observations  that  one  could  make  during  a  visit  to 

Horton  Plains  is  the  dying  of  trees  at  an  alarming  rate,  which  is  termed  ‘forest  dieback’. 

Although research has been performed on forest dieback in montane forests, the aetiology 

of forest dieback at Horton Plains remains largely unresolved. This preliminary study was 

undertaken  to  investigate  the  effect  of  arbuscular  mycorrhizae  on  forest  dieback  in  Sri 

Lanka.  The  findings  would  make  a  significant  contribution  to  the  conservation  and 

sustainable management of this montane forest.  



 

Twenty four permanent plots (20 m x 20 m) were established randomly to cover 

an affected area in the Horton Plains National Park. Four treatments; control (T1), addition 

of  compost  (T2),  compost  with  native  montane  mycorrhizae  (T3)  and  native  montane 

mycorrhizae  only  (T4)  were  used.  The  treatments  were  initiated  in  September  2008  and 

were  repeated  every  six  months,  to  five  randomly  selected  Syzygium  rotundifolium 

saplings in each plot. After 18 months composite soil samples from each experimental plot 

were  analysed.  Roots  of  S.  rotundifolium  saplings  were  also  assessed  for  arbuscular 

mycorrhizal  colonisation.  Certian  soil  physical,  chemical  and  biological  properties  were 

determined.  

 

Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings  showed  higher  arbuscular  mycorrhizal 

colonisation  in  T2,  T3  and  T4  than  in  the control  (T1).  The  addition  of  native  arbuscular 

mycorrhizae significantly increased (P<0.05) the arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation in S. 

rotundifolium compared to the control. Soil analyses showed a relatively low fungal spore 

count  compared  to  studies  done  in  similar  ecosystems.  Soil  pH,  soil  organic  matter 

content and total nitrogen showed no significant difference between treatments. However, 

total  phosphorus  content  significantly  increased  in  plots  with  mycorrhizal  addition 

compared to the control. Foliar heavy metal levels decreased in compost and arbuscular 

mycorrhizae  added  treatments  (T2  and  T3).  Results  suggest  that  addition  of  native 

arbuscular  mycorrhizae  together  with  compost  can  enhance  certain  edaphic 

characteristics  and  thereby  enhance  the  growth  of  S.  rotundifolium  saplings.  These 

findings  may  highlight  the  significance  of  using  arbuscular  mycorrhizae  and  compost  to 

enhance  the  regeneration  potential  of  native  saplings  in  forest  dieback  areas  in  Hortain 



plains.  


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə