Forest Resources Assessment Programme Working Paper 78/e rome



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə10/12
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12

Trend of Fragmented Forest
(Percentage of Total Land Area)
3.8
3.6
3.6
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
4
1975
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
2005
Year
P
e
rcen
ta
g
e
 
 
Assessment 
 
The data from independent remote sensing for 1980, 1990 and 2000 on selected sample locations 
in India indicates that percentage of fragmented forest is increasing since 1990 at a significant 
rate. This condition of forest is not good for the country. 
 

 
76 (114) 
 
3.3 Biodiversity 
 
This section provides information on the method and approach chosen to identify and assess the 
complementary national variables followed by the national data and brief assessment.  
 
3.3.1  Method and Approach 
 
India through FSI organised a group comprising of experts from various disciplines to implement 
the “Group Convergence Method” (Govil, 2002) for identification and assessment of variables. 
The group identified variables that are necessary to explain condition of forest against this criteria 
(Theme) but could not asses most of them due to lack of data. 
 
3.3.2  Relevant Variables  
 
India has identified following five national variables that in addition to the four global variables 
(Conservation forests, Conservation “Other Wooded lands”, Forest Tree Species, Forest 
Composition) that are essential to describe the biodiversity in its forests. 
 
a.
 
Area under Protected Areas (PA) 
b.
 
Status of Endemic Species (flora) 
c.
 
Status of Nationally Threatened Species (flora) 
d.
 
Status of Introduced and Invasive Species (flora) 
e.
 
Species Richness and Diversity  
 
3.3.3  Source and Source Data  
 
Following table indicates sources of data for the additional variables.  
 
Additional Variable  
Source 
Extent of Protected 
Areas 
Gadgil, M. and Meher-Homji, V.M. 1986. Localities of great 
significance to conservation of India’s biological diversity. Proc. IAS. 
Suppl. 1986. 
 
The Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, India 
 
National Wildlife Database.. Wildlife Institute of India (WII), India. 
Status of Endemic 
species 
Chowdhary, H.J. & Murti, S.K. 2000. Plant Diversity and Conservation 
in India – An Overview. B.S.I. Dehradun.  
 
Nayar, M.P. 1996. Hot-spot of Endemic Plants of India, Nepal and 
Bhutan. Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala. 
Status of Nationally 
Threatened Species  
Nayar, M.P. and A.R.K. Sastry 1987. Red Data Book of Indian Plants 
Vol. 1 to 5. BSI, Calcutta.  
Introduced and Invasive 
Species 
No temporal Data is available 
Species Richness and 
Diversity 
No temporal Data is available 
 

 
77 (114) 
3.3.4 Additional Data  
 
This section provides information on each of the identified additional variables. It contains 
relevant definitions, source and source data, temporal trends and its assessment. 
 
3.3.4.1 Area under Protected Areas 
 
The protected areas (PAs) provide ecological baseline information apart from ecological services 
including serving as gene banks and providing sustenance to life support system.  In India 
primarily there are two major (National Parks and Sanctuaries) legal categories of PAs to provide 
legal protection to wildlife. The extent (size) of the PA within each forest types indicates social 
and political commitment of the country for conserving biodiversity and also the extent to which 
forest resources are better conserved.  
 
Definitions 
 
National Park 
An area declared, whether under sec.35. or sec.38 or deemed, under sub-section (3) 
of sec.66 of Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 to be declared, as a National Park 
Sanctuary 
An area declared, whether under sec. [26(A)5] or sec 38, or deemed, under sub 
section (3) of Sec.66 of Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 to be declared, as a wildlife 
sanctuary 
 
Transformation Not necessary 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
A comparison 1985 and 2000 indicates that number and area of PA has increased from  298 (51 
National Parks and 247 Sanctuaries) covering 10.055 million ha to 573 (89 National Parks and 
484 Sanctuaries) in covering 15.404 million ha in 2000.  
 
Percentage of Total National Forests under 
Protected Area 
20.96
29.30
20
22
24
26
28
30
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
2005
Year
P
e
rc
e
n
ta
ge
 of
 Tot
a

F
o
rest
 A
rea
 
 
 
 

 
78 (114) 
Assessment  
 
Increasing trend number, area and forested area under PA is indicates better sustainability 
conditions. 
 
3.3.4.2 Status of Endemic Species (Flora) 
 
Endemism represents the uniqueness of the flora of a region or local area and leads to understand 
local patterns of bio-diversity. It basically captures the “natural” spatial distribution of species. 
 
Definition (CBD) 
 
Endemic Species 
An endemic species is a native species restricted to a particular geographic 
region owing to factors such as isolation or in response to soil or climatic 
conditions. 
 
Transformation Not necessary 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
India has about 6000 endemic species. The Eastern Himalayas and Western Ghats are included in 
the list of so far identified 18 "Hotspots" in the world. India has three mega centres (Eastern 
Himalayas, Western Himalayas, and Western Ghats) and more than 40 sites of high endemism 
(Nayar, 1996). Few important centres of them are Trans Himalayan Cold desert &  Western 
Himalayan regions, Garhwal-Kumaon Himalayas, Eastern Himalaya, North eastern regions, 
Aravali hills, Panchmari-Satpura-Bastar region, Chotanagpur plateau, Simlipal-Jeypore hills, 
Eastern Ghats, Western Ghats, Saurashtra-Kutch region and Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 
There are about 5725 endemic species out of an estimated 17000 flowering plants. Of this, 3471 
are Himalyaan taxa, nearly 2015 are peninsular region & 239 are from Andaman & Nicobar.  
 
There are different estimates of endemics shown by different workers as number of species are 
added due to more and more explorations and also sometimes decreased due to exclusion of the 
species from the list of endemics if it is reported from other geographic region.  
 
The trend data on endemic species is not available as normal regular assessments (forest or 
botanical survey) do not address these species and because no specific survey are done for them 
to collect temporal data. 
 
Assessment 
 
The variable is important but due to lack of temporal data no trends are available limiting its 
utility to monitor the sustainability of forest resources.  
 

 
79 (114) 
 
3.3.4.3 Status of Threatened Species  
 
Regular monitoring of “Threatened species” is very necessary for conservation of biodiversity. In 
absence of this information no policy or intervention can be designed to ensure sustainability of 
the biodiversity. 
 
 
Definition (IUCN) 
 
Threatened Species 
A taxa classified in any of the three IUCN categories namely Critically 
Endangered, Endangered, or  Vulnerable species. 
 
Transformation Not needed 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
Nayar and Sastry (1987, 1988, 1990) indicate that 623 species were under various categories of 
threat. During the last decade BSI has identified over 1150 rare/threatened species of flowering 
plants (Vol. IV & Vol. V of Red Data Book) Following figure presents this trend. 
 
Trend in Number of Threatened Species
1150
623
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1985
1990
1995
2000
2005
Year
Nu
m
b
e
r o
f S
p
e
c
ie
s
 
 
Assessment 
 
The data indicates addition of 527 (1150-623) species but in absence of complete details it is not 
clear whether these new species have been surveyed for the first time or they were surveyed in 
past and were not threatened. Assuming that these were surveyed earlier, it can be said that the 
increase in number of threatened is indicate conditions adverse for sustainability of forest 
resources. 
 

 
80 (114) 
 
3.3.4.4 Introduced and Invasive Species (Flora) 
 
Introduced species are introduced with some specific objectives while invasive species invade the 
area naturally. Monitoring of these species is necessary to understand their positive or negative 
contribution to the sustainability of forest resources. 
 
Definition 
 
Term Definition 
Introduced Species 
"Alien species" (synonyms: non-native, non-indigenous, foreign, exotic): a 
species, subspecies, or lower taxon introduced outside its normal past or present 
distribution; includes any part, gametes, seeds, eggs, or propagules of such 
species that might survive and subsequently reproduce. 
(UNEP/CBD/SBSTTA/6/INF/5 Annex II.) 
Invasive Species 
Invasive species are organisms (usually transported by humans) which 
successfully establish themselves in, and then overcome, otherwise intact, pre-
existing native ecosystems IUCN/SSC (Species Survival Commission) Invasive 
Species Specialist Group 
 
Transformation  
 
Not required as no temporal data is available on either of the two variables. 
 
Data and Temporal Trend  
 
Following table provides some of the available information on the introduced species. 
 
Species 
Place of introduction 
Country of origin 
Acacia auriculiformis 
FRI West Bengal, Bihar  
Queensland, Australia 
Acacia decurrents 
Nilgiris (1524m to 2133m) 
-do- 
Acacia mangium 
Dinga,coastal area of south-west Bengal 
Australia 
Acacia mearnsii 
Nilgiris (in 1677at 2286m) 
Palni Hills (in 1828  at 2438m) 
Australia (S.victoria) and 
Tasmania 
Acacia dealbata 
Nilgiris (in 1832 above 1524m) 
Tasmania and south Australia. 
Acacia pyenantha 
Nilgiris and U.P. 
-do- 
Acacia tortillas 
Jodhour, Rajasthan 
Israel 
Adenthera microsperma 
F.R.I., Dehra Dun 
Indonesia, Jawa. 
Agathis robusta 
F.R.I., Dehra Dun 
Queensland, Australia. 
Albizia falcate 
Assam Indonesia 
Araucaria cunninghamii 
F.R.I., Dehra Dun 
Queensland, Australia 
Bambusa burmenica 
F.R.I., Dehra Dun 
Burma 
Bambusa glaucescens 
F.R.I., Dehra Dun 
China 
Broussonetia papirifera 
Bamanpokri (Bengal), Shahapur (Maharastra), 
Dandeli (Karnataka), Begur (Tamilnadu) 
China 
Castenea sativa 
Manali (H.P.). Chakrata (U.P.) 
Europe 
Casuarina equestifolia 
Tamil Nadu (in 1860) 
Indonesia 
C. Cunninghamiana 
West Coast of Saurashtra (in 1950) 
Thailand 
C. junghaniana 
Tamilnadu Thailand 
Chlorisia specisoa 
New Forest 
S. Brazil 

 
81 (114) 
 
(follows from previous page) 
Species  
Place of introduction 
Country of origin 
Cinnamomum camphora 
New Forest, Saharanpur, Tamil Nadu 
Karnataka. 
China and Japan 
Christomaria japonica 
Darjeeling (West Bengal) 
Japan 
Dendrocalamus giganteus 
New Forest 
Burma 
Eucalyptus Alba 
New Forest 
Indonesia, N. America 
E.Camaldulensis 
Punjab, U.P. 
Australia 
E.Citriodora 
Londha, Dandeli 
Australia 
E.deglupta 
New Forest 
Indonesia 
E.globulus 
Nilgiris (Tamil Nadu) 
Australia 
E.grandia 
Kerala Australia 
E.maculata 
Shahapur (Maharastra) 
Australia 
E.paniculata 
New Forest 
Australia 
E. tereticornis 
U.P., Assam, Punjab 
Australia 
Fagus sylvatica 
Kulu, Manali (H.P) 
Europe 
Fraxinus excelsa 
Kulu, J& K 
Europe 
Havea brasiliensis 
Kerala, Tamil Nadu 
Brazil 
Grevillea pteridifolia 
Amar Kantak (Shahdol), Madhya Pradesh 
Australia 
Grivellea robusta 
New Forest, Mussoorie 

Leucaena leucocephala 
New Forest, Maharastra, Gujarat, Bihar. 
Hawaii, Philippines, El 
Salvador, Peru. 
Ocroma lagopus 
Tamil Nadu, Karnataka. 
Central America 
Parkinsonia aculeate 
Rajasthan, U.P., Delhi 
Mexico 
Pinus carebaea 
Assan, New forest, M.P. 
Br.Honduras 
P. nigra 
West Bengal, H.P. 
Europe 
p.patula 
West Bengal, Bihar, H.P. 
Mexico 
P.taeda 
H.P. U.S.A. 
P. deltoids 
H.P., U.P., Punjab. 
US and European Countries 
Prosopis juliflora 
Rajasthan, M.P. Maharasta, Tamil Nadu 
Mexico 
 
Assessment  
 
Due to lack of temporal data no trend assessment was done. 
 
3.3.4.5 Species Richness and Diversity 
 
Natural ecosystems with more species richness and diversity are considered more resilient than 
with less. Hence, these variables have the potential to monitor sustainability of forests. 
 
Definition  
 
Species Richness 
The number of species within a region.  
Species Diversity 
The number and variety of species found in a given area in a region. 
 
Transformation  
 
Not required as data is not available. 
 

 
82 (114) 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
National level information on these variables is not available for developing temporal trends. 
 
Assessment  
 
No assessment has been attempted as sufficient data is not available. 
 

 
83 (114) 
 
3.4 Productive 
Functions 
 
This section first presents the method and approach chosen to identify and assess the 
complementary national variables and then provides national data and its assessment. 
 
3.4.1  Method and Approach 
 
The for identification and assessment of  variables, India through FSI used the “Group 
Convergence Method” (Govil, 2002).  Two workshops were organized one for briefing and 
explaining and second for implementation of  Group Convergence Method to arrive at the final 
list of identified variables. Temporal trends were developed and GCM was used to assess the 
state and change in these variables with respect to sustainability of forest resources. 
 
3.4.2 Relevant Variables 
 
Following national variables in addition to the two global variables (“Wood Removal” and 
“NWFP Removal”) have been identified as complementary national variables that are essential to 
explain the state of  “Production Function” in India and for which some information was 
available. 
 
a.
 
Per Hectare Growing Stock  
b.
 
Rate of Annual Volume (Growing Stock) Increment  
c.
 
Extent of Planting Stock Improvement 
 
3.4.3 Source Data  
 
Additional Variable  
Source 
Per Hectare Growing 
Stock 
SFR, 1987 State of Forest Resources 1993. Forest Survey of India
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. 
 
SFR, 1993 State of Forest Resources 1993. Forest Survey of India, 
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. 
 
SFR, 1997. State of Forest Resources 1995. Forest Survey of India, 
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India 
 

 
84 (114) 
(from previous) 
Rate of Annual Volume 
Increment 
SFR, 1991 State of Forest Resources 1993. Forest Survey of India, 
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. 
 
SFR, 1993 State of Forest Resources 1993. Forest Survey of India, 
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. 
 
SFR, 1997 State of Forest Resources 1993. Forest Survey of India, 
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India. 
Area under improved 
Planting Stock 
K. Gurumurthi and K. Subramanain. 1997. Research and Extension 
strategies for Genetics, Tree Improvement and Propagation in 
ICFRE, Proceedings of National Workshop on Linkage between 
Forestry Research and Forestry Practices held at ICFRE, Dehra 
Dun, May, 1997. 
 
Seedling Seed Orchard for Breeding Tropical Trees. 2000. Institute 
of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding, ICFRE, Coimbatore, India. 
 
3.4.4 Additional Data 
 
This section provides information on each of the identified additional variables. It contains 
relevant definitions, source and source data, temporal trends and its assessment. 
 
3.4.4.1 Per hectare Growing Stock 
 
The per hectare growing stock defines the level of flow of goods and services form forests. It  is a 
direct measure of production function of forests. It becomes a measure of sustainability of the 
forests when its trend is related with annual growth rate of forests and annual production. 
 
Definition 
 
Term 
Definition 
Per Hectare Growing Stock 
The growing stock per unit area (hectare) of forests  
 
Transformation: Not needed 
 
Data and Temporal Changes 
 
Following table and figure present the growing stock and growing stock per hectare respectively 
for the years 1984 and 1994. 
  
Year of Assessment 
Forest Cover  
(million ha) 
Growing stock  
(million m
3

1984 63880  4328 
1994 63340  4340 
 

 
85 (114) 
Trend in Growing Stock Per Hectare
67.758
68.521
67
68
68
69
69
1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000
Year
G
row
ing S
toc
k
 i
n
 C
ubi

M
e
te
r/
 H
ect
ar

   
 
Assessment  
 
The increasing trend in Growing Stock per hectare is a good sign for sustainability of the forest 
resources. 
 
3.4.4.2 Rate of Annual Volume Increment 
 
The growing stock and its annual increment define the level of potential flows of good and 
services from a forests. The management and silviculture system have the capacity to manipulate 
the annual rate of increment of a forest within a given ecological and biological range. It is a very 
important variable for sustainable forest management and it basically fixes the value of a forest.  
 
Definition 
 
Transformation Not needed 
 
Data and Temporal Trends 
 
It is difficult to make  estimation of annual increment of forest growing stock at national level in 
India due to large number of forest types and because statistical measurements from well laid out 
sample plots and tree increment plots are not available for last two or three decades. 
The FSI has opted an alternative approach and used Von Mental’s formula (Increment =2* 
growing stock/ rotation) to estimate this variable. The FSI  assumes a rotation period for each of 
its inventory stratum  and calculates its increment using Von Mental’s formula. Based on this 
approach, FSI has generated estimates for 1986 ( Assessment year 1989), 1990 (Assessment year 
1993) and 1994 (Assessment year 1997).  
 

 
86 (114) 
Trend in Annual Incre m ent of Grow ing Stock
81.87
81.96
90.16
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
1984
1986
1988
1990
1992
1994
1996
Year
A
n
n
u
a
l I
n
cr
em
en
t
in
 m
illio
n
 C
u
b
ic M
e
te
rs
 
 
Assessment 
 
Rise and then decline in the annual increment is within 10 percent limit, which is less than the 
range of accuracy of its estimation. Therefore, it is difficult to infer whether the change indicates 
a “trend” or a “fluctuation”.  
 
3.4.4.3 Extent of Planting Stock Improvement 
 
 
Productivity and production are directly related to each other. India is one of the oldest and a 
leading country in terms of age and area under forest plantations but unfortunately not in 
performance in terms of survival and productivity. Therefore, India has taken steps for Tree 
improvement programs from beginning of 1960s. This programs consists of improving planting 
stock  through establishment of high quality and productive Seed Production Areas (SPA) 
Seedling Seed Orchards (SSOs) and Clonal Seed Orchards (CSOs), and adopting improved 
vegetative propagation techniques and mass multiplication approaches.  
 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə