Forest Resources Assessment Programme Working Paper 78/e rome



Yüklə 5.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/12
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12

 
3.2.4 Additional Data  
 
This section provides information on each of the identified additional variables. It contains 
relevant definitions, source and source data, temporal trends and its assessment. 
 
3.2.4.1 Status of Natural Regeneration 
 
Natural regeneration indicates the capacity of ecosystem to sustain the “forests” in perpetuity. 
The information was collected by FSI while conducting forest inventories. FAI follows a 
systematic sampling method for its forest inventories where it overlays a 2 ½’x 2 ½’ grid of 
latitudes and longitudes divides on a 1:50,000 scale topographic sheet to divide it into 36 grid 
cells and selects two sample points within each such grid for collecting inventory data from a 

 
67 (114) 
square plot of 0.1 ha at each of these sample points. The FSI lays a 4 m x 4 m plot at each of two 
sample points to collect supplementary data on natural regeneration. 
 
Definition (FAOA)  
 
No standard national definition is available 
 
Terms Definition 
Natural Regeneration 
Natural succession of forest trees on temporarily unstocked forest lands 
 
 
Transformation There is no need for transformation of the variable. 
 
Data and Temporal Changes  
 
The information on assessment of regeneration is only available for only 1982 and 1992.   
 
Trend in Percentage of Forest Lands with 
Natural Regeneration
61.5
26.4
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
2005
Year
Pe
rc
e
n
ta
ge
 of
 N
a
tu
ra

R
e
ge
ne
ra
ti
o
n
 
 
Assessment of Variable 
 
The negative trend indicated during 1982 to 1992 is not good for the sustenance of forest 
resources in the country. 
 
3.2.4.2 Incidence of Insect and Pests  
 
Insect pests are normally present all the time in forest areas and it is only when they cross certain 
threshold the condition is called “out break”. Majority of insect pests are localized and general 
feeders but some are quite specific and confine to a particular hosts only. There is lack of 
systematically recorded data on incidence and damage by forest insects.  
 

 
68 (114) 
 
Table: Major Insect Pest Problems in Forests, Plantations and Nurseries 
Insect pest species 
Common 
name 
Order/family 
Year of Epidemics/ Mortality 
Cryptothelia 
cramerii Westwood 
Chir pine 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Psychidae 
First epidemic reported in 1885 from Tons Valley, Uttranchal. 
Subsequently recorded from H.P. (1928), Kahhula, Pakistan 
(1934). Recently reported from Rajouri (J&K) in 1989 – 1990. 
5% mortality in 2000 ha. area, with 0.3 million trees in J&K; 
net loss 22.5 million rupees. 
Hoplocerambyx 
spinicornis Newman 
Sal heart 
wood 
borer 
- do - 
Epidemic dates back to 1899 in Singhbhoom, Bihar. Reported 
from Assam (1906, 1961), H.P. (1‘948 – 1952), M.P. (1905, 
1927 – 28, 1948-52, 1959-63), Uttranchal (1916-24, 1934-37, 
1958-60, 1961, 1965), West Bengal (1931-34). Recently a very 
heavy epidemic occurred in M.P. in 1998, affected some million 
sal trees. 
Hypsipyla robusta 
Moore 
Toon shoot 
borer 
- do - 
A serious pest of toon and mahogony, capable of causing 
100% mortality in seedlings and young plantations. In India, 
some of the seriously infested toon plantations were destroyed, 
causing loss of R.15-30 per acre. Also reported to cause 
damage in Sri Lanka, Australia, Bangla Desh, Pakistan, 
Nigeria and West Indies). 
Ectropis deodarae 
Prout 
Deodar 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera: 
Geometridae 
Large areas of deodar forests in the outer ranges of north - 
western and western Himalaya are often defoliated completely 
by Ectropis deodarae, causing heavy mortality. Recently, an 
epidemic of deodar defoliator was reported from Lolab Valley, 
J&K. Mortality has been as high as 30%. Epidemics have 
occurred at intervals of about 10 year and may last for 2 or 3 
years. 
Eutectona 
machaeralis Walker 
Teak 
skeletonize

Lepidoptera : 
Pyralidae 
Major pests of teak, occurring throughout south Asia and some 
parts of South-East Asia. Complete defoliation by the pests 
results in more or less leaflessness during most of the growing 
period. The damage varies from almost negligible to as much 
as half of the total annual increment. The studies carried out in 
the past estimate the loss to about 0.051 millions/ha/year. 
Plecoptera reflexa 
Guenee 
Shisham 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Noctuidae 
Serious epidemic in Changa Manga and Khanewal forest 
divisions (now in Pakistan) in 1899. Serious epidemics have 
been recorded from Chichawatni and Khanewal in 1927, 1928, 
1932 and in Ambala forest division in 1974 and 1975. 
Dioryctria abietella 
Devis & Schiffer 
Mudlor 
Chilgoza 
cone borer 
Lepidoptera : 
Pyralidae 
The insect causes, damage to cones and seeds of coniferous 
species, covering major zoogeographical regions of the world 
(North-West and Western Himalaya, Afghanistan and Europe 
and North America). Reported 32.7% damage to Pinus taeda 
in 1973-74, 1.5-=5.4% in Abies pindrow in Pakistan in 1980 
and almost 100% loss in seeds in fully developed cones of  
Pinus wallichiana in 1986 in Chakrata, Uttranchal. 
Celosterna 
scabrator Fabr. 
Babul 
shoot & 
root borer 
Coleoptera : 
Cerambycidae 
A most notorious pest of Acacia nilotica reported from Bera 
(M.P.) in 1890. Incidence of borer attack upto 80% has been 
reported from the babul planted in unsuitable sites. Reported to 
be injurious to Acacia catechu, Cassia siamea, Casuarina 
equisetifolia, Eucalyptus spp., Prosopis juliflora, P.spocigera, 
Tectona grandis. 
Eligma narcissus 
Rothschild 
Ailanthus 
defoliator 
Lepodoptera: 
Noctuidae 
Defoliates seedlings and young plants (upto 5 years old) in 
plantations of Ailanthus excelsa and A.triphysa in pennisulan 
India. During heavy infestation, about 20-40% larvae are found 
in each leaf, causing heavy damage whereas in nurseries 
complete defoliation (100%) may occur. A widely distributed 
species in South – East Asia, east of Phillipines in the Oriental 
region. 

 
69 (114) 
 
(follows from previous) 
Insect pest species 
Common 
name 
Order/family 
Year of Epidemics/ Mortality 
Eterusia pulchela 
Khasi pine 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Zygaeniidae 
A large scale epidemic occurred in 1975 in 7500 ha. of Jaintia 
hills and 2500 ha. in Khasi hills. Affected stands of 5-30 years; 
heavy mortality (50%). Heavy defoliation occurred again in 
1978. Two or more complete defoliations are sufficient to kill 
the tree. 
Apriona cinerea 
Cheverolet 
Poplar 
stem borer 
Coleoptera : 
Cerambycidae 
A serious problem in cultivation of exotic poplars in India. 
Mostly 1-3 years old plants are more prone to borer attack. 
Very common in North-West Himalaya and the adjoining 
plains region. 
Atteva fabriciella 
Swedrus 
Ailanthus 
webworm 
Lepidoptera : 
Yponomentida 
A major pest in young plantations of Ailanthus excelsa and 
A.grandis is greater part of India and Pakistan. Repeated 
defoliations result in increment loss, particularly in plantations 
growing and hostile soil conditions. Also reported from 
Kalimantan (Borneo). 
Eucosoma 
hypsidrves Meyrick 
Spruce bud 
Worm 
Lepidoptera : 
Eucosmidae 
A major primary cause of mortality of Picea spp. in the 
Himalayas. Trees of all ages are attacked. Heavy and repeated 
infestation results in weakening of the host. 
Calopepla leayana 
Latreille 
Gamha 
defoliator 
Coleoptera : 
Chrysomelidae 
A serious pest of gamhar plantations in Assam, Trefru.  Heavy 
infestation leads to drying up of shoots of young trees and the 
trees remain leafless for about 4 months of the growing season 
leading to ultimate death. 
Melosoma populi 
Linn. 
Poplar 
defoliator 
Coleoptera : 
Chrysomelidae 
A serious pest of Poplars and Willows in the temperate 
Himalayas from J&K to Arunachal Pradesh. 
Clostera cupreata 
Butler 
C. fulgurita 
(Walker) 
Poplar 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Notodontidae 
A major problem in poplar plantation in tarai region of Uttar 
Pradesh since 1966 and in Punjab since 1986. Develop into 
epidemic form after 3
rd
 year of plantation of Poplars.   
Dichomeris 
eridantis Meyrick 
Shisham 
leaf roller 
Lepidoptera : 
Gelechidae 
A major problem in Shisham plantations. 
Lebeda nobilis 
Walker 
Chir pine 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Lasciocampidae 
Large scale epidemic defoliation in Sankosh Valley chir forest 
in Bhutan from 1984 to 1986, led to large scale drying of chir. 
All age classes of pines are attacked. 
Lymantria obfuscate 
Walker 
Kashmir 
Willow 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Lymentridae 
Most destructive pest of Willows, results in loss of increment: 
trees may be killed if they are severely defoliated for more 
than one year.   
Malacosoma indica 
Walker 
Forest tent 
cater pillar 
Lepidoptera : 
Lascocampidae 
Widespread defoliation epidemics occur in North-West 
Himalaya. 
Tonica niviferana 
Walker 
Semul 
shoot borer 
Lepidoptera : 
Oecophoridae 
An important pest in Semul nurseries and young plantations. 
The attacked shoots of the young plants die in due course. The 
same plant may be attacked again and again. If the attack is 
repeated consequently for some years, the young plants are 
killed. 
Hyblea puera Gram 
Teak 
defoliator 
Lepidoptera : 
Hybleaidae 
Pest epidemics reported from time to time. 
 
Assessment 
 
The frequency and extent of incidence is increasing and it is not a good sign for sustenance of 
forest resources in India. 
 

 
70 (114) 
 
3.2.4.3 Incidence Weeds Infestation 
 
Invasion of forest lands by alien species or incidence of weeds is the most urgent problem faced 
by forest resource managers. The forest weeds compete with native and desired forest flora for 
light, moisture, nutrients and space. They include herbs, shrubs, vines and tree species. Table 
gives a list of main weeds in forests of India. Survival and growth of selected trees is an 
important aspect of forest management. Weeds compete with these trees for light, moisture, 
nutrients and space 
 
Definition No national definition is available. 
 
Transformation Not necessary 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
Not much data is available on this important variable; therefore development of temporal trend is 
not available. 
 
Table: Main Weeds in Forests of India 
Species Distribution 
Eupatorium odoratum 
Assam, West Bengal, Bihar, Karnataka, Kerala, Goa, Western 
Ghat region. 
Lantana camara 
Throughout India, in hilly regions up to 8000 ft. height. 
Mallotus philippensis 
Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Bihar, Sub-himalayan tract from 
Punjab eastward ascending up to 4500 ft. West Bengal, 
Central India. 
Clerodendron viscoscum 
Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Bihar, Nagaland up to 4500 ft. 
height 
Moghania chapper 
In Sal forests of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. 
Ageratum conyzoides 
Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Bihar, 
Desmodium cylindrica 
Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Bihar, 
Erienthus munja 
Tall grass in plantations throughout India 
Sacharum spontaneum 
Tall grass in plantations throughout India 
Dendrophthoe falcate 
Parasites in commercial forests of India 
Scurulla parasitica 
Parasites in commercial forests of India 
Cuscuta reflexa 
Parasites in commercial forests of India 
Viscum monoicum 
Uttar Pradesh, Sikkim, Meghalaya, Western Peninsula 
Macrosolen cochinensis 
Parasites in commercial forests of India 
Mikania 
Throughout India 
Parthenium 
Throughout India 
Carthamus oxycantha 
Throughout India 
Argemone maxicana 
Throughout India 
 
Assessment 
 
There is perception among experts that there is an increasing trend of weed infestation in forest 
areas. Non availability of data makes the situation worse. 

 
71 (114) 
3.2.4.4 Incidence of Grazing in different Forest Types 
 
In most of the forests in India, the level and nature of grazing, in general, exceeds the capacity of 
the forests and thus is one of the most important factor for degradation of forests. One gues 
estimates that about 100 million cattle graze in forest area against its capacity of about 28 million 
livestock. This problem gets worse because, neither public not private grazing lands or range 
lands are scientifically managed in India.  
 
Definition No national definition is available 
 
Transformation It is not necessary 
 
Data and Temporal trends 
 
The FSI also conducts a supplementary assessment of the extent of grazing when it is conducting 
forest inventory in a forest area. The FSI has already covered about 80% of the forest area of the 
country under ground inventories. It estimates that about 77.6 per cent of forest area of the 
country is affected by grazing. Of this 17.9% of forest area is affected by high incidences of 
grazing, 30.7% by medium and 29% by light grazing incidences. Following figure indicates the 
extent of grazing in different forest types. 
 
 
Incidence of Grazing in differnt Forest Types
28.2
25.6
10.2
31.2
30.2
32.4
19.3
26.6
28.2
30.1
36.6
25.3
13.4
11.9
33.9
16.9
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Coniferous
Moist Deciduous
Dry Deciduous
W et and Semi-
evergreen
Forest Types
P
e
rc
ent
 G
raz
in
g
No Grazing
Light 
Medium 
Heavy
 
 
Assessment 
 
The forests are under very high incidence of grazing pressure that is more than their capacities. 
Therefore, it may endanger their long-term sustainability. 
 
3.2.4.5 Incidence of Fire 
 
Frequent and unplanned fires adversely affect forest stock as well as flow of its goods and 
services. About 54.7% of India’s forests are fire prone and of this about 9.2% forest areas are 

 
72 (114) 
affected by frequent forest fires and 45.5% forest areas by occasional fires (FSI, 1997). Further, 
most of such forest fires are caused by man.  
 
Definition There is no national definition for fire 
 
Transformation Not necessary 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
FSI conducted a study to estimate extent of fire in 1995 through 139 scenes on 1:1 million scale 
with three lasses (i) fire affected, (ii) smoke and (iii) fire unaffected.  An intensive ground 
verification was done on related 349 toposheets at 1:50,000. The study revealed that during 1995 
at national level about 2.31 percent of forest cover was affected by fire.  
There is no other study at the national level to indicate the trend.   
 
Assessment  
 
No national level assessment is possible due to lack of data.  
 
3.2.4.6 Incidence of Pollutants 
 
The pollutants affect development of plant through their impact on photosynthesis and respiration 
leading to modified distribution and sustenance of species and their foliar diseases. The 
sustainability of the any forest relating to the impact of pollutants may be judged either looking 
their absorbing and mitigation potential or looking the damages due to pollutants. 
 
Definition  
 
Term  
Definition 
Pollutant 
Any substance, which causes pollution, is called a pollutant.  
Explanation: 
A pollutant may include any chemical or geo-chemical substance, biotic component or its 
product, or physical factor that is released intentionally by man into the environment in such a 
concentration that may have adverse, harmful or unpleasant effects. 
 
Transformation Not needed 
 
Data and Temporal Trends No Data is available  
 
Assessment 
 
The variable is important but lack of data limits any assessment. 
 

 
73 (114) 
 
3.2.4.7 Presence of Indicator Species 
 
Certain indicator species help to judge the health and vitality of a forest.  For example,  the 
presence of palms, orchids, ferns, arboreal mammals, owls, honey bees and butterflies may 
reflect the stable and healthy forests. It is considered important that India identifies “keystone 
species” and documents the presence, absence or abundance of such key indicator taxa within the 
representative forest types.   
 
Definition (UNEP)  
 
No standard national definition is available  
 
Term Definition 
Indicator Species 
A species whose status provides information on the overall condition of the 
ecosystem and of other species in that ecosystem.  
 
Explanation 
It flags changes in biotic or abiotic conditions.  
They reflect the quality and changes in environmental conditions as well as aspects 
of community composition. 
 
Transformation: No data is available hence no question of transformation. 
 
Data and Temporal trend 
 
Necessary information is not available. Recently, few Protected Areas have started systematic 
monitoring of vegetation structures, rare plants and animals in the country but no assessment has 
been done for various species as indicators of forest health.  
 
Assessment 
 
The variable is very useful but lack of data limits its utility. 
 
3.2.4.7 Density of Forest Canopy 
 
This variable is very important because it expresses the distribution of canopy defines the 
composition, rates of growth and regeneration of forest stands as canopy controls distribution of 
sunlight to plants. Any significant change in the forest canopy may have effect on forest 
succession, growth and composition. 
 
Definition 
 
Term Definition 
Canopy Density 
Percent area of land covered by canopy of the trees 
 

 
74 (114) 
Transformation Not needed 
 
Data and Temporal Trend 
 
Following figures present the information on the percent of dense and open canopy forest in 
India. 
 
Trend on Dense and Open Canopy Density
61.70
38.30
59.70
58.47
60.76
60.66
60.66
59.66
56.69
40.30
41.53
39.24
39.34
39.34
40.45
43.41
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
1980
1982
1984
1986
1988
1990
1992
1994
1996
1998
2000
2002
Year
P
e
rcent
Dense
Open
 
 
Assessment 
 
The trend indicates the density of closed forest is increasing. This is a good sign for sustenance of 
forest resources in India. 
 
3.2.4.8 Status of Forest Fragmentation 
 
The forest fragmentation directly affects the local ecological processes processes both in the short 
as well as in the long-run and may endanger sustainability of resulting smaller patches of forests. 
The loss of connectivity between too patches may threaten existence of certain floral and faunal 
species and may also reduce adaptation resiliency of forest system to climate change. It may also 
lead to forest and land degradation, soil erosion and depeletion of water storage and flow. 
Therefore, the “forest fragmentation” is one of key factors for monitoring of sustainability of 
forest resources. 
  
Definition (CBD’s definition)  
 
No national standard definition is available 
 
Term Definition 
Forest Fragmentation 
Any process that results in the conversion of formerly continuous forest into patches 
of forest separated by non-forest (lands). 
 

 
75 (114) 
Transformation Not considered necessary 
 
Data and Temporal trend 
 
The following presents information on the percentage of fragmented forest in 1980, 1990 and 
2000 based on the independent remote sensing implemented by FAO, Rome. 
 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə