Garden Management, Education, Information & Training



Yüklə 368 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə8/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü368 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   17

The  division  is  devoted  to  plant  systematics  in  the  broad  sense,  encompassing 
phylogenetic,  evolutionary  and  biogeographical  studies  at  the  family,  population, 
specic  and  higher  taxonomic  levels  including  molecular  aspects  of  microbes, 
mushrooms and owering plants.  To achieve these objectives, the research activities 
are focused theme –wise such as i) oristic studies and biodiversity evaluation of 
ecologically  sensitive  areas  of  Westerns  Ghats,  ii)  survey,  documentation  and 
analysis of plant resources for sustainable utilization, iii) assessment of threat status 
of 'Red listed' species, iv) reproductive biology/ecology and ecosystem assessment, 
v) restoration biology etc.  The division also co-ordinated Lead Garden programmes 
at national level with nancial assistance from MoEF, Govt. of India in recognition of 
our expertise.
The  division  is  devoted  to  plant  systematics  in  the  broad  sense,  encompassing 
phylogenetic,  evolutionary  and  biogeographical  studies  at  the  family,  population, 
specic  and  higher  taxonomic  levels  including  molecular  aspects  of  microbes, 
mushrooms and owering plants.  To achieve these objectives, the research activities 
are focused theme –wise such as i) oristic studies and biodiversity evaluation of 
ecologically  sensitive  areas  of  Westerns  Ghats,  ii)  survey,  documentation  and 
analysis of plant resources for sustainable utilization, iii) assessment of threat status 
of 'Red listed' species, iv) reproductive biology/ecology and ecosystem assessment, 
v) restoration biology etc.  The division also co-ordinated Lead Garden programmes 
at national level with nancial assistance from MoEF, Govt. of India in recognition of 
our expertise.
Division of
Plant Systematics
Evolutionary Science
Division of
Plant Systematics
Evolutionary Science

114
Survey, exploration and documentation of oristic 
wealth of Kerala was continued. 38 plant collection trips 
were  conducted  to  different  regions  of  Kerala,  Tamil 
Nadu  and  Karnataka.  A  total  of  6853  herbarium 
specimens of 1167 species were collected during the 
period 2012-13 and 7228 specimens belonging to 1430 
species during 2013-14. Two interesting specimens of 
Antidesma  were  collected  from  Chemunji  hills  of 
Agasthyamala Biosphere Reserve.   After critical study, 
one was conrmed as A. keralense Chakrab. & Gang, a 
species  which  was  erected  based  on  the  fruiting 
specimens collected by M. Mohanan in 1979.  Thus the 
present collection has added additional information on 
owering characters to the protologue of the species.  
The  other  specimen  has  turned  out  to  be  an 
undescribed one, which is in the process of publication. 
All the specimens were processed and identied with 
the  help  of  various  ora  and  compared  with  the 
authentic specimens deposited at MH, CALI and TBGT.  
 
Goniothalamus  keralensis  E.  S.  Santhosh  Kumar,  T. 
Shaju, P. E. Roy & G. Raj Kumar, Syzygium dhaneshiana 
M.K.  Ratheesh  Narayanan,    S.M.  Shareef  &  T.  Shaju, 
Memecylon  ponmudianum  Sivu,  N.S.  Pradeep  & 
Pandur., M. waynadense Sivu et al., Sonerila veldkampii 
M. K. Ratheesh Narayanan, T. Shaju & M. Sivadasan, 
Syzygium palodense Shareef S.M., E.S. Santhoshkumar 
& T. Shaju, Impatiens jhonsiana Ratheesh Narayanan et 
al.  and  Memecylon  wayanadense  Sivu  A.R.,  N.S. 
Pradeep & A.G. Pandurangan were described as new 
species. Henckelia macrostachya (E. Barnes) A. Weber 
&  B.L.  Burtt,  H.  lyrata  (Wight)  A.  Weber  &  B.L.  Burtt, 
Memecylon  avascence  Gamble  and  M.  lawsonii 
Gamble  were  rediscovered  after  the  type.  Cyperus 
surinamensis Rottb. was recorded for the rst time from 
India.  Cyperus  papyrus  L.,  was  a  new  record  for  the 
Western  Ghats.  Memecylon  clarkeanum  Cogn.,  M. 
parvifolium Thw.,   M. procerum Thw. and  M. wightii Thw. 
were  new  records  for  Peninsular  India.  Koilodepas 
calycinum  Bedd.  and  Canscora  stricta  Sedgw.  were 
reported for the rst time from Kerala.
As part of the Taxonomic studies of the climbing 
ora of Kerala state, 6 collection trips were conducted 
and  310  specimens  belonging  to  63  species 
representing  8  families  were  collected.  Important 
among them were Ampelocissus indica (L.) Planchon, 
Asparagus  gonoclados  Baker,  Cansjera  rheedii  J. 
Gmelin,  Capparis  sepiaria  L.,  Derris  trifoliata  Lour., 
Dioscorea wightii Hook. f., Elaeagnus kologa Schlecht, 
Grewia  orientalis  L ., 
Luvunga  eleutherandra 
Dalz.,  Merremia  vitifolia 
(Burm. f.) Hallier. f., Piper 
hymenophyllum  Miq., 
R u b u s   m i c r o p e t a l u s 
Gardner,  Sarcostigma 
kleinii  W ight  &  Arn., 
Solanum  seaforthianum 
Andrews,  Trichosanthes 
bracteata  (Lam.)  Voigt., 
Tylophora  tetrapetala 
(Dennst.)  Suresh  and 
Ventilago  bombaiensis 
Dalz.   All the specimens 
w e r e   p r e p a r e d   f o r 
herbarium, identied and 
incorporated  into  the 
existing collections.
Taxonomic  studies 
o f   t h e   f a m i l y 
G e n t i a n a c e a e   i n 
s o u t h e r n   W e s t e r n 
Ghats  was  initiated  to 
assess species diversity 
occurring  in  the  study 
area  based  on  fresh 
collections.  Regional 
and  national  herbaria 
such  as  CALI,  BSI  and 
a & b. Memecylon clarkeanum Cogn.; c. Koilodepas calycinum Bedd.; 
d. Memecylon ponmudianum Sivu, N. S. Pradeep & Pandur.
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

115
M.S.  Swaminathan  Research  Foundation,  Wayanad 
were visited and data regarding distribution, phenology, 
rarity etc.  were collected. Ten plant collection trips were 
conducted to different forest localities in the study area 
which  resulted  in  the  collection  of  250  specimens 
belonging to 16 species along with their photographs 
and  other  relevant  eld  data.  The  specimens  were 
processed  for  herbarium,  studied  critically  and  their 
taxonomic  identities  were  determined  based  on  the 
literature and with the authentic specimens deposited in 
Madras  Herbarium  (MH)  Coimbatore.    In  addition, 
detailed descriptions, illustrations, distribution aspects, 
associated  species  and  other  relevant  notes  were 
prepared.    The  important  species  collected  include 
Canscora bhattiana Prasad & K.S. Ravi, C. diffusa (Vahl) 
R.Br. ex Roem. & Schultes, C. heteroclita (L.) Gilg, C. 
perfoliata  Lam.,  C.  roxburghii  Arn.  ex  Miq.,  C.  stricta 
Sedgw., Enicostemma axillare (L.) Raynal, E. pumilum 
Griseb.,  Exacum  courtallense  var.  boneccordensis  M. 
Mohanan,  E.  sessile  L.,  E.  tetragonum  Roxb.,  E. 
wightianum  Arn.,  E.  wightianum  Arn.  var.  uniorum 
Henry  &  Swamin.,  Gentiana  pedicellata  var.  wightii 
Kusn., Hoppea dichotoma Willd, H. fastigiata (Griseb.) 
C.B.  Clarke,  Swertia  beddomei  C.B.  Clarke,  S. 
corymbosa  (Griseb.)  and  S.  lawii  (Wight  ex  C.B.  Cl.) 
Burkill.   The species Canscora stricta Sedgw., hitherto 
known  only  from  Karnataka,  forms  an  addition  to  the 
Flora of Kerala.
Taxonomic studies on the family Asclepiadaceae 
R. Br. of Southern Western Ghats was continued. 52 
specimens  representing  13  species  were  collected, 
processed  and  taxonomic  identity  established.    In 
addition,  illustrations,  detailed  descriptions  and  other 
relevant notes were completed for 75 species and the 
work is being continued.  Important collections include 
Ceropegia  bulbosa  Roxb.  var.  bulbosa,  Cynanchum 
tunicatum  (Retz.)  Alston,  Hemidesmus  indicus  var. 
pubescens (Wight & Arn.) Hook. f., Hoya retusa Dalz., 
Tylophora  mollissima  Wallich  ex  Wight  &  Arn., 
Sarcostemma  viminale  (L.)  R.Br.  150  specimens  of 
Asclepiadaceae  were  incorporated  in  to  the  existing 
herbarium -TBGT.
U n d e r   Ta x o n o m i c   s t u d i e s   o f   t h e   g e n u s 
Cinnamomum  Schaeffer,  365  specimens  of 
Cinnamomum were collected from different regions of 
southern Western Ghats. The important collections are 
C .   c h e m u n g i a n u m   M o h a n a n   &   H e n r y ,   C . 
lipedicellatum  Kosterm.,  C.  keralense  Kosterm.,  C. 
malabatrum (Burm. f.) Blume, C. palghatensis Gangop.
C. perrottettii Meissn., C. sulphuratum Nees, C. verum J. 
S. Presl and C. wightii Meissn.  All the specimens were 
identied  by  cross  matching  with  the  authentic 
a. Exacum. tetragonum Roxb.;b.  E. wightianum Arn.
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

116
specimens  deposited  in  Madras  Herbarium  (MH), 
Coimbatore  and  Calicut  University  Herbarium  (CALI). 
As  part  of  ex-situ  conservation,  370  seedlings 
representing 8 species were collected and introduced 
in the eld gene bank and their growth performance is 
being assessed. Air-layering of 4 species were carried 
out in their respective habitats and are being monitored 
at regular intervals.  The live collections made during the 
period include Cinnamomum lipedicellatum Kosterm., 
C.  keralense  Kosterm.,  C.  litseaefolium  Thw.,  C. 
macrocarpum Hook.f., C. malabatrum (Burm.f.) Blume, 
C.  palghatensis  Gangop.,  C.  perrottetii  Meissner,  C. 
sulphuratum Nees, C. verum J.S.  Presl etc.
Taxonomic studies on the genus Sonerila Roxb. in 
Western Ghats was continued. The genus has about 
175 species distributed mainly in tropical Asia.  In India, 
it is represented by 35 species of which 30 species and 
two varieties are distributed in Western Ghats.   Out of 
this 22 are endemics, 10 of which are included under 
RET category.     25 species were so far collected and 
illustrations and detailed taxonomic descriptions were 
completed.  In  addition,  one  new  variety  of  Sonerila 
rheedii  and  a  new  sub  species  of  Sonerila  zeylanica 
were also collected.  Some of the interesting collections 
are S. barnessii Fischer, S. brunonis Wight. & Arn., S. 
devicolamensis Nayar, S. grandiora R. Br. ex Wight & 
Arn.,  S.  pedunculosa  Thwaites,  S.  nemakadenis 
Fischer,  S.  pulneyensis  Gamble,  S.  rheedii  Wallich  ex 
Wight & Arn., S. rotundifolia Bedd., S. sadasivanii Nayar
S.  sahyadrica  Zanker,  S.  tinneveliensis  Fischer,  S. 
versicolor  var.  axillaris  (Wight)  Gamble,  S.  veldkampii 
Ratheesh Narayanan et al., S. wallichii Bennet and S. 
wynaadensis Nayar.
The  study  on  Inventory,  Systematics  and 
Conservation of the family Annonaceae of Southern 
Western Ghats with emphasis on Endemic, RET Plants 
was  aimed  at  documenting  the  species  diversity  and 
richness  of  the  family  Annonaceae  in  the  Southern 
Western  Ghats  to  understand  their  distributional 
r a n g e s ,   p h y t o g e o g r a p h y,   t h r e a t   s t a t u s   e t c . 
Annonaceae is considered as a primitive family which 
had  been  evolved  from  the  Magnoliaceous  line  of 
evolution.   It has about 1220 species distributed world 
over  in  tropical  and  subtropical  forests.    In  India,  the 
family is represented by 129 spp., of which nearly 60% 
are endemics.  The family, on account of its high degree 
Miliusa wightana Hook. f. & Thoms
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

117
of  endemism  and  evolutionary  signicance,  has 
attracted  much  attention  among  the  scientic 
community. An in-depth study of the family will result in 
generating  much  more  interesting  information  on 
systematics, distribution, rarity, endemicity, phenology, 
herbivory, ecology etc. The study resulted in collection 
of  200  specimens  belonging  to  22  species  under  8 
genera from different regions of Kerala and Tamil Nadu 
of Southern Western Ghats. Among them, 16 species 
are grown in the ex- situ eld conservatories that were 
raised  through  seed  collection  and  by  conventional 
propagation.  The  study  also  focuses  on  conserving 
endemic  and  RET  species  through  seed  bank, 
arboretum, as part of ex-situ conservation. 
Studies  on  the  status  report  of  RET  species  of 
Western Ghats was taken up to prepare   an accurate 
list of RET species of Western Ghats, with the baseline 
information on the species concerned and assessing 
their threat status following IUCN norms and suggesting 
measures for their conservation both by in-situ and ex-
situ  means.  IUCN  (2010)  has  estimated  that  nearly 
33418  species  of  owering  plants  around  the  world 
comes  under  threatened  category.  Our  study  has 
identied 900 angiosperm species as threatened taxa 
from the Western Ghats region based on extensive eld 
surveys, thorough screening of available literature and 
visiting  major  herbaria  of  Southern  India.  In  addition, 
passport  data  of  individual  species  including  recent 
botanical  name,  habit,  habitat,  altitudinal  range, 
owering-  fruiting  season,  distribution/  area  of 
occupancy, threat status etc. are being prepared. The 
family  wise  representation  of  the  RET  species  in  the 
Western  Ghats  region  as  evident  from  the  study  was 
also prepared. Among the 900 species, 188 are trees, 
174  shrubs,  422  herbs,  66  shrub  climbers,  37 
herbaceous climbers and 13 are woody climbers. It was 
also observed that 727 species are endemic exclusively 
to the Western Ghats region and the remaining 173 are 
non-endemic  but  with  narrow  distribution.  Of  the  727 
endemic species, 96 species are exclusively endemic 
to the Kerala region. Among 900 RET species, 23 are 
presumed  to  be  extinct  as  there  is  no  record  of 
occurrence  or  collection  in  the  last  100  years,  93  are 
critically  endangered,  170  are  endangered,  207  are 
a. Memecylon heyneanum Benth. ex Wight & Arn. b. Shorea roxburghii G. Don
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

118
vulnerable,  359  are  rare  and  for  the  remaining  48 
species,  data  are  insufcient  for  including  in  any  of 
these  categories.  Hence  they  are  included  in  the 
'insufciently known' category.
Systematics  and  Phytogeographic  Evaluation  of 
Grasses and Sedges in Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve is 
being carried out to analyze the oristic composition, 
distribution  status  and  development  of  conservation 
strategies of grasses and sedges in Nilgiri Biosphere. 
Special attempts were made to locate the endemic, rare 
and endangered, economically important species such 
as wild relatives of cereals, millets and other cultivated 
crops. Field trips were conducted to different regions of 
Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve covering all the seasons from 
300 – 2690 m which resulted in the collection of 4,730 
specimens  of  grasses  and  sedges.  A  total  of  316 
species of grasses including 21 varieties in 115 genera 
and 148 species of sedges (including 3 subspecies and 
18  varieties)  in  21  genera  were identied. Among  the 
collection,  Chrysopogon  asper  Blatt.  &  McCann, 
Indopoa  paupercula  (Stapf)  Bor,  Tripogon  capillatus 
Jaub.  &  Spach,  Dimeria  borii  Sreekumar  et  al, 
Sporobolus  tenuissimus  (Schrank)  Kuntze.,  Cyperus 
digitatus  var.  khasianus  (Clarke)  Kern.,  Cyperus 
rubicundus  Vahl,  Fimbristylis  dura  (Zoll.  &  Moritz  ex 
Moritz)  Merr.,  Fimbristylis  woodrowii  Clarke,  Kyllinga 
brevifolia  var.  stellulata  (Valck.  –  Sur.)  Ohwi  form  new 
additions to NBR.  The study delimited Andropogoneae 
and Cypereae as the dominant tribes in grasses and 
sedges  respectively  by  comprising  37  and  7  genera 
each. The dominant genera of grasses were Eragrostis 
with 16 spp. followed by Arundinella (13), Ischaemum 
(12),  Panicum  (11)  and  Isachne  (10).  The  dominant 
genera in sedges were Cyperus (37), Fimbristylis (33) 
and Carex (26).  The study added additional information 
on distribution of 74 grasses and 40 sedges to the NBR 
out of which 66 grasses and 34 sedges were naturally 
occurring  but  overlooked  by  earlier  researchers.  The 
study  identied  that  20  grasses  found  in  NBR  are 
endemic  to  Western  Ghats,  out  of  which  14  species 
were  strictly  endemic  to  NBR  alone.  In  the  case  of 
sedges,  14  species  endemic  to  Western  Ghats  were 
collected, among which 7 were strictly endemic to NBR. 
The high degree of endemism in this area points out the 
Cyperus papyrus L.
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

119
relevance  and  importance  of  the  study  from  both 
conservation and ecological point of view. Both these 
groups are growing abundantly and form a major part of 
herbage  for  grazing  of  both  wild  and  domesticated 
animals. About 78 % of grasses and 26 % of sedges 
have  fodder  value.  750  specimens  were  ready  for 
incorporation in to the herbarium of Jawaharlal Nehru 
Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute (TBGT). 
A  comprehensive  monograph  including  identication 
keys,  detailed  nomenclature,  taxonomic  descriptions, 
photographs, illustrations, phenology, distributions and 
other  relevant  notes  of  both  grasses  and  sedges  are 
under preparation. 
Studies  on  Floristic,  ecologic  and  functional 
dynamics  of  selected  grasslands  of  the    Western 
Ghats was undertaken to assess the oristic wealth, to 
understand  ecological  and  edaphological  functioning 
of  the  ecosystem  and  to  estimate  net  primary 
productivity of montane grasslands above 1500 m, in 
selected  areas  such  as  Chemunji  Hills,  Munnar  and 
Chembra.  This  unique  ecosystem  supports  a  large 
number of faunal elements and thus plays a pivotal role 
in  energy  balance  of  nearby  forest  ecosystems.  The 
studies were carried out by bimonthly eld exploration 
for  oristic  survey  and  quantitative  inventory  of 
grasslands. The ecological and productivity studies in 
Chemungi, Eravikulam National Park (Pettimudi), ENP 
(Mestrikkett),  and  Vagamon  were  conducted  through 
transect  method  after  sampling.  The  study  areas  are 
diverse  in  oristic  components  and  general  and 
physical  edaphology.  The  type  of  vegetation  and 
dominant species vary in different sites and frequently 
noticed types were Ischaemum–Eulalia,-Chrisopogon-
A r u n d i n e l l a ,   E u l a l i a - A n d r o p o g o n , 
Cymbopogon–Ischaemum. The major deciding factors 
are altitude, soil type, stage of succession, occurrence 
of  re,  grazing  (domestic  and  wild)  and  the 
anthropogenic pressure which plays a key role in the 
ecological  functioning  and  productivity  of  these 
ecosystems (Table 1). Even though the grasslands are 
2
All values are expressed in gm/m
Fig.1. Bar diagram showing the biomass productivity of study areas
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

120
2
showing average biomass accumulation of 1944 gm/m  
2
to 3596 gm/m , the productivity and biomass turnover 
are also dependant on the above factors (Fig. 1). The 
analysis  of  soil  samples  that  were  collected  from  the 
respective sites indicates that the biological, chemical 
and physical characters are also site specic. The soil is 
acidic  with  high  percentage  of  total  soluble  salt. 
Hydrological  properties  are  also  commendable  for 
protecting  the  microbial  wealth  and  conserving 
rainwater.  The  indicated  water  regime  throughout  the 
year is progressive and positive. (Table. 2) Hence these 
ecosystems  are  very  vital  in  protecting  wildlife, 
conserving  water  and  keeping  environmental 
equilibrium. 
As part of the programme of Taxonomic evaluation of 
exclusive endemic angiosperms of Kerala, the Division 
taxonomically evaluated 267 endemic taxa exclusively 
for  Kerala  in  11  endemic  belts  represented  from  sea 
coast to highlands. 24 endemics were known only from 
type that was not so far relocated.   Therefore, efforts 
were made to locate these endemics. Collection trips 
were  conducted  to  the  areas  where  more  number  of 
JNTBGRI Annul Report 2012-’13 & 2013-’14
Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute 

121
endemics occur such as Eravikulam National Park and 
Chinnar  Wildlife  Sanctuary  in  Idukki  district  and 
Agasthyamala  Biosphere  Reserve,  Kerala  region  in 
Thiruvananthapuram and Kollam districts.  A total of 175 
specimens of 65 endemic and IUCN red list category 
species were collected, processed and identied. The 
important endemics collected during the period include 
Ophiorrhiza  brunonis  var.  johnsonii  Hook.f.,  Sonerila 
barnesii  C.E.C.  Fischer,  Aporusa  bourdillonii  Stapf., 
Eugenea  argentea  Bedd.,  Arisaema  psittacus  Barnes, 
Buchanania barberi Gamble etc.  Other endemics such 
as Syzigium bourdillonii (Gamble) Rathakr. & N.C. Nair
Litsea  beei  Mohanan  &  Santhosh.,  Memecylon 
agasthyamalayanum  Santhosh  et  al.,  Ophiorrhiza 
brunonis  var.  johnsonii  Hook.f.,    Impatiens  stocksii  
Hook.  f.  &  Thoms.  etc.  were  also  collected  and 
processed  for  herbarium  voucher  specimens.  The 
important  Red  List  category  species  collected  during 
the  study  include  Hopea  erosa  (Bedd.)  Slooten, 
Impatiens elegans Bedd., Lasianthus blumeanus Bedd., 
Litsea  beddomei  Hook.  f.,  Shorea  roxburghii  G.  Don, 
Pogostemon travancoricus Bedd., Premna paucinervis 
(Clarke)  Gamble,  Psychotria  macrocarpa  Hook.  f., 
Memecylon  heyneanum  Benth.  ex  Wight  &  Arn., 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə