General introduction



Yüklə 105.03 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü105.03 Kb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL 

INTRODUCTION 

 

 

General 

Introduction

 

1 

 

GENERAL INTRODUCTION 

Insects represent more than half of the 1.5million species of living organisms 

known  to  science  (Marquardt  and  Kondratieff,  2005).  They  live  everywhere  from 

mountain  tops  in  the  Himalayas  to  the  tide  pools  at  the  sea  shore.  This  truly 

demonstrates  the  immense  ecological  adaptation  of  insects  in  diverse  environments 

where  other  animals  seldom  survive.  As  they  dominate  all  terrestrial  environments 

that  support  human  life,

 

they  are  usually  the  most  important  competitors  for  food, 



fibre  and  other  natural  resources.

 

Their  biological  success  is  attributed  to  the 



enormous  diversity  in  size,  body  structure,  mating  strategies  and  the  remarkable 

evolutionary  engineering  in  feeding  and  behavior.  It  is  this  diversity  that  imposes  a 

delicate  relationship  between  insects  and  human  life.  Several  insects  species  are 

known to be of medical and veterinary importance and the majority of them belong to 

the  suborder  nematocera  which  include  families  such  as  Culicidae  (mosquitoes), 

Psychodidae  (Phlebotominae  sub-family,  sand  flies)  and  Simuliidae  (black  flies). 

Among  them  mosquitoes  are  found  everywhere  in  the  world,  except  Antarctica 

continent (Marquardt and Kondratieff, 2005).   

The family Culicidae known for true flies such as mosquitoes is derived from 

Spanish or Portuguese meaning ‘little fly’ is the most important one from public point 

of  view.  This  family  is  further  classified  into  three  subfamilies,  Toxorhynchitinae, 

Anophelinae and Culicinae. Among these members, Anophelinae and Culicinae play 

a very important role in public health due to their vectorial capacity. The Anophelinae 

being  the  small  group  includes  vectors  of  malaria  (genus  Anopheles)  and  the 

Culicinae consists of vectors of viral diseases such as Japanese encephalitis, west nile 

fever,  yellow  fever,  dengue  hemorrhagic  fever  etc.,  and  diseases  such  as  lymphatic 



General 

Introduction

 

2 

 

filariasis  (Genus  Aedes,  Culex  and  Mansonia).  Estimates  made  by  the  World  Health 



Organization  (WHO)  showed  that  247  million  people  became  ill  in  2006  alone  and 

about  one  million  deaths  occurred  from  mosquito-borne  diseases  (WHO,  2008). 

Approximately three quarters of all mosquito species live in the humid tropics and sub 

tropics  where  the  warm  moist  climate  has  favored  the  existence  of  diversity  of 

habitats permitting the evolution of many species. 

All  mosquito  species  need  water  to  complete  their  life cycle.  It  goes  through 

four  separate  and  distinct  stages  of  its  life  cycle:  Egg,  Larva  (1

st

,  2



nd

,  3


rd

  and  4


th

 

instars),  Pupa  and  Adult  (Fig.1).  The  developmental  duration  of  each  stage  depends 



mainly on both temperature and species characteristics

Eggs are laid one at a time as 



in the case of Anopheles or attached together to form "rafts" in Culex and they float on 

the surface of the water where as Aedes eggs are laid on damp surfaces. Not all eggs 

are  laid  at  once,  but  they  can  be  spread  out  over  hours  or  days,  depending  on  the 

availability of suitable substrates. In case of Culex and Culiseta species, the eggs are 

stuck  together  in  the  form  of  rafts  of  about  200  eggs.

 

Species  of  the  Cx.  pipiens 



complex,  especially  Cx.  quinquefasciatus  is  an  urban  and  semi  urban  vector  of 

bancroftian  filariasis,  caused  by  Wuchereria  bancrofti  in  Asia,  Africa  and  South 

America  (WHO,  2007).  It  breeds  in  a  wide  variety  of  stagnant  water  habitats 

including  barrels,  wells,  tanks,  privies,  cess  pools,  septic  tanks,  ponds  and  drainage 

canals near by houses (Fig. 2), where the water is sufficiently polluted. It is mainly a 

night biting mosquito although

 

it bites occasionally in dark rooms during day time. It 



is both exophagic and endophagic in nature and may be anthropophilic  or zoophilic. 

Night  feeding  rhythm  of  this  vector  is  very  much  associated  with  the  periodic 

appearance of the microfilariae in the peripheral blood stream.

 

 



General 

Introduction

 

3 

 

Lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been a major public health problem in India. The 



disease  was  recorded  in  India  as  early  as  6

th 


century  B.C.  by  the  famous  Indian 

physician,  Susruta  in  his  book  ‘Susruta  Samhita’  (Bhaskar  et  al.,  2000).  In  the  7

th

 

century  A.D.,  Madhavakara  described  signs  and  symptoms  of  the  diseases  in  his 



treatise  ‘Madhava  Nidhana’  which  hold  good  even  today.  In  1709,  Clarke  called 

elephantoid  legs  in  Cochin  as  Malabar  legs.  In  India,  the  discovery  of  microfilariae 

(mf)  in  the  peripheral  blood  was  made  first  by  Lewis  in  1872  in  Calcutta 

(Anonymous, 2013).

   

Lymphatic filariasis is a vector-borne, chronically disabling parasitic infection 



causing elephantiasis, lymph-edema, and hydrocele. In India, 99.4% of the cases are 

caused by the species – W. bancrofti whereas Brugia  malayi is responsible for 0.6% 

of the problem. Worldwide 91% of LF is caused by W. bancrofti while B. malayi and 

B.  timori  infections  account  for  the  other  9%  (Bockarie  et  al.,  2009).  These  lymph-

dwelling  parasites  have  biphasic  lifecycles  involving  the  definitive  mammalian  host 

and  various  genera  of  mosquitoes  including  Culex,  Anopheles,  Aedes  and  Mansonia 

as intermediate hosts (Fig. 3). When a mosquito with infective stage larvae (L3) bites 

a person, the parasites migrate to the lymphatic vessels where they develop into adult 

worms  in  lymphatic  system.  The  persons  having  circulating  microfilariae  are 

outwardly  healthy  but  transmit  the  infection to  others  through  mosquitoes.  Blockage 

of lymphatic vessels by the death of adult worms is an important contributing factor, 

which  triggers  an  acute  inflammation  producing  painful  swelling  of  genitals,  breasts 

and limbs (lymphedema). In most cases, the filarial infections are asymptomatic.

 

The 


persons with chronic filarial swellings suffer severely from the disease but no longer 

transmit  the  infection.  Infection  is  usually  acquired  in  childhood  but  the  painful  and 

profoundly  disfiguring  visible  manifestation  of  the  disease  occur  later  in  life,  when 


General 

Introduction

 

4 

 

acute episodes of the disease cause temporary disability and lymphatic filariasis leads 



to permanent disability (Anonymous, 2013a) (Fig. 4).

 

This  condition  has  a  devastating  impact  not  only  physically  but  also 



emotionally leading to a social stigma. Also, this disease itself is a strong impediment 

to  socio-economic  development,  as  it  is  typically  acquired  in  young  age,  but  its 

chronic complication develops in adults, who may become physically incapacitated or 

stigmatized,  so  that  they  lose  the  opportunity  to  marry  and  raise  a family  (Dreyer  et 



al.,  2000).  Lymphatic  filariasis  (LF)  mainly  affects  poor  communities  of  both  urban 

and  rural  areas  because  its  transmission  is  favored  by  crowding,  lack  of  bed-nets, 

inadequate  sanitation,  open  drainages  and  presence  of  stagnant  water  nearby  houses 

which  provides  breeding  sites  for  Culex  quinquefasciatus.  It  is  in  this  context  more 

attention  is  needed  to  explore  ecofriendly  control  method  to  be  invented  with  long 

lasting impact. 



Present Scenario 

Nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries through out the tropics and subtropics 

of  Asia,  Africa,  the  Western  Pacific  and  parts  of  the  Carribean  and  S.  America  are 

threatened  by  LF

 

(WHO,  2014).



 

Approximately  40  million  people  suffer  from  the 

stigmatizing and disabling clinical manifestations of the disease, including 15 million 

who  have  lymphoedema  (elephantiasis)  and  25  million  men  having  urogenital 

swelling, principally scrotal hydrocele (Anonymous, 2010) 

LF  is  unevenly  distributed  in  the  South  East  Asian  region,  and  is  generally 

more a rural problem. Almost half (49.2%) of the 120 million estimated cases are in 

the South East Asia region and another 34.1% cases are in African region (Pani et al., 

2005).  Nine  countries  are  endemic  to  the  disease  in  South  East  Asia  which  includes 


General 

Introduction

 

5 

 

Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, Timor-Leste and 



Srilanka  with  873,264,167  estimated  people  at  risk  (Anonymous,  2010).  In 

Bangladesh, there are 64 districts, out of which 34 are endemic to the disease and in 

Indonesia, 356 out of 495 districts are endemic. Forty five districts are endemic to the 

disease in Myanmar out of 65 while sixty out of 75 districts are endemic to disease in 

Nepal (Anonymous, 2011). 

India  is  regarded  as  a  tropical  country  though  the  tropic  of  cancer  (boundary 

between  tropics  and  subtropics)  passes  through  the  middle  of  India;  and  hence  the 

tropical  disease  such  as  filariasis  is  common  which  has  been  recorded  since  6

th

 

century. According to an estimate in 2010, a total of 553 million people are at risk of 



infection  and  approximately  21  million  people  with  symptomatic  filariasis  and  27 

million  microfilaria  carriers  (Sabesan  et  al.,  2010).  Seventeen  states  and  six  Union 

Territories  were  identified  to  be  endemic  with  about  553  million  people  exposed  to 

the risk of infection and of them, about 146 million live in urban and the remaining in 

rural areas. About 31 million people were estimated to be the carriers of mf and over 

23 million suffer from filarial disease manifestations in India (WHO, 2005). The state 

of  Bihar  has  highest  endemicity  (over  17%)  followed  by  Kerala  (15.7%)  and  Uttar 

Pradesh  (14.6%).  Andhra  Pradesh  and  Tamil  Nadu  have  about  10%  endemicity  and 

Goa showed the lowest endemicity (less than 1%) followed by Lakshadweep (1.8%), 

Madhya  Pradesh  (about  3%)  and  Assam  (about  5%).      B.  malayi  is  prevalent  in  the 

states  of  Kerala,  Tamil Nadu,  Andhra  Pradesh,  Orissa,  Madhya  Pradesh,  Assam  and 

West  Bengal.  The  single  largest

 

track  of  this  infection  lies  along  the  west  coast  of 



Kerala,  comprising  the  districts  of  Trichur,  Ernakulum,  Alleppey,  Quilon  and 

Trivandrum,  stretching  over  an  area  of  1800  sq.  km.  The  infection  in  the  other  six 

states is confined to a few villages. Surveys undertaken in Kerala and a few villages in 


General 

Introduction

 

6 

 

other states revealed either a reduction of foci or complete elimination of the parasite 



as  well  as  the  vector(s)  in  many  areas  which  were  endemic  for  B.  malayi  infection 

four decades back (Regu et al., 2005).   

In  Karnataka,  nine  districts  are  endemic  to  LF  that  includes  Gulbarga, 

Dakshina  Kannada,  Raichur,  Uttar  Kannada,  Bijapur,  Udupi,  Bidar,  Bagalkot  and 

Yadgir  (Dorle  et  al.,  2011).  Among  the  nine  districts  Gulbarga  and  Yadgir  have  the 

highest  number  of  population  at  risk  (3.75million)  followed  by  Raichur  (1.96)  and 

Bidar  (1.75  million)  (Anonymous  2012).  Therefore  serious  elimination  programmes 

are  necessary  and  people  have  to  be  educated  to  get  the  compliance  rate  for 

Diethylcarbamazine  (DEC)  consumption.  Filarial  control  activities  under  National 

Vector  Borne  Disease  Control  Programme  (NVBDCP)  are

 

being  implemented  in 



these  districts  since  December  2003.  At  present,  25  filarial  clinics,  8  filarial  control 

and one survey units are functioning in Karnataka (Anonymous, 2013). A case study 

at  Mysore,  a  non-endemic  district  has  also  revealed  the  existence  of  a  patient,  with 

microfilaremia of sub periodic nature (Sumana et al., 2009). 



Control Strategy 

In 2000, the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis was formed as 

a  partnership  to  support  national  elimination  programmes  in  endemic  countries.  For 

this the main control measures adopted were insecticide residual spray and mass drug 

administration (MDA). In order to achieve elimination of LF, the programme in India 

has  been  made a  part  of  the  NVBDCP  in  2003,  under  the  National  Health  Policy  of 

2002,  and  a  target  set  for  elimination  of  LF  by  2015.  In  India  annual  mass  drug 

administration  with  single  dose  of  DEC  was  taken  up  as  a  pilot  project  covering  41 

million  population  in  1996-97  and  extended  to  77  million  population  by  2002 


General 

Introduction

 

7 

 

(Anonymous,  2005).  The  main  control  measures  were  insecticide  residual  spray  and 



mass drug administration (MDA) of DEC at a dose of 6mg/kg body wt. annually; the 

drugs  also  included  albendazole  and  ivermectin  depending  on  the  endemicity.  Later 

the committee noticed the ineffectiveness of insecticidal spray due to vector resistance 

and  hence  withdrew  it.

 

Moreover,  16.5%  treated  people  experienced  side  effects 



during  such  mass  drug  treatments  and  hence  anti-parasitic  measures  were  also 

withdrawn  (WHO,  2008).  Now  it  is  clear  that  in  the  absence  of  vaccine  for  LF,  the 

most  reliable  approach  to  eradicate  this  would  be  interruption  of  the  disease 

transmission cycle by either targeting mosquito larvae or killing their

 

adults. A major 



reason  for  persistence  of  this  disease  is  the  lack  of  awareness  of  the  environmental 

aspects  of  the  parasite  transmission.  Thus, an integrated  strategy  emphasizing  vector 

control  along  with  MDA  has  emerged  as  an  important  supplementary  component  of 

the filariasis elimination programme (Anonymous, 2013a).

 

 

Since many years, vector control has been based on synthetic insecticides such 



as  organochlorines,  organophosphates  and  pyrethroids.  Liquid  formulations  of  these 

insecticides were extensively used as residual spray to protect from mosquito bites. It 

is  known  that  though  the  chemical  control  measures  are  effective  because  of  the 

immediate impact, the selective pressure imposed by the conventional insecticides are 

enhancing resistance in various mosquito species (Hamdan et al., 2005; Sarkar et al.

2009; Anto et al., 2009). 

 

The  efficacy  of  synthetic  chemicals  as  well  as  the  development  of  resistance 



has  a  long  history.  Edwards  (2002),  a  leading  entomologist  who  has  participated  in 

the Second World War shared his experience of application of DDT and its immediate 

effect against mosquitoes and body lice during the war in Europe, in 1944. Later on, it 


General 

Introduction

 

8 

 

was introduced to the public for mosquito control in 1946 and just in one year (1947) 



the first case of DDT resistance occurred in Ae. tritaeniorhynchus and Ae. solicitans 

(Hemingway  and  Ranson,  2000).  Organophosphorus  insecticide  resistance  also 

became widespread in all the major Culex vectors in addition to pyrethroid resistance 

in Cx. quinquefasciatusAn. albimanusAn. stephensi, An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti

while  carbamate  resistance  was  reported  in  An.  sacharovi  and  An.  albimanus  (Amin 

and Hemingway, 1989; Brogdon and Barber, 1990; Hemingway et al., 1992; Mourya 



et  al.,  1993;  Vulule  et  al.,  1994;  Vatandoost  et  al.,  1996;  Hemingway  and 

Karunaratne, 1998; Bencheik et al., 1998; Chandre et al., 1999). 

 

With the above backlashes of chemical control in mind, the research has been 



diverted  towards  the  development  of  new  and alternative agents  to  control  mosquito 

vectors. Moreover chemical insecticides form a load in the environment by their long 

term  persistence,  high  toxicity  and  propensity  for  accumulation.  According  to 

Rodriguez et al., (2009) indoor residual spray may lead to local irritation and severe 

allergic  reactions.  Epidemiological  studies  have  revealed  that  long-term  exposure  to 

mosquito  coil  smoke  can  induce  asthma and  persistent  wheeze  in children  (Koo  and 

Ho,  1994).  Dich  et  al.,  (1997)  have  reported  that,  there  exists  relationship  between 

cancer and chemical pesticides. The treatment of stagnant water bodies with floating 

layer  of  expanded  polystyrene  beads  can  prevent  mosquito  breeding  for  extended 

periods  (Sivagnaname  et  al.,  2005).  However,  this  control  method  does  not  persist 

during floods and in rainy season as water sweeps away the beads from the pits. 

The  management  of  larvae  through  the  application  of  larvicides  is  an  ideal 

method  for  controlling  mosquitoes  (Gubler,  1996).  Since  “adulticides”  may  only 

reduce the adult population temporarily, most of the mosquito control programs target 



General 

Introduction

 

9 

 

the  larval  stage  in  their  breeding  sites  (El-Hag  et  al.,  1999;  2001).  It  is  easier  to 



control  delicate  mosquito  larvae  that  have  not  yet  left  their  aquatic  habitat  than  to 

control  adult  mosquitoes.  Also,  this  method  reduces  the  overall  application  of 

pesticides  needed  to  control  the  mosquito  population  (Dharmagadda  et  al.,  2005). 

Evidences  show  that  vector  control  through  larval  monitoring,  source  reduction  and 

personal  protection,  combined  with  a  good  sanitary  environment  in  households  and 

communities are effective in preventing filariasis (Anonymous, 2013a).   

In recent decades, the phytochemicals have received much attention due to its 

target  specific  and  eco-friendly  nature  in  control  of  vectors.  These  phytochemicals 

could  induce  multiple  effects  which  include  male  sterility,  growth  regulation, 

fecundity  suppression,  larvicidal,  ovicidal  and  oviposition  activity  mostly  as 

deterrents  (Mulla  and  Su,  1999).  Sukumar  et  al.,  (1991)  have  reported  an  extensive 

review of efficacy of phytochemicals against mosquitoes. Especially members of the 

families  such  as  Asteraceae,  Cladophoraceae,  Labiateae,  Miliaceae,  Oocystaceae, 

Myrtaceae  and  Rutaceae  possess  various  routes  of  activity  against  many  species  of 

mosquitoes.  Thus,  screening,  purification  and  structure  elucidation  of  the  botanical 

insecticides  have  been a  challenge  since  1924,  when  the  major  structural features  of 

the  pyrethrins  (from  pyrethrum)  were  reported  by  Staudinger  and  Ruzicka.  Further, 

the  structure  of  rotenone  was  depicted  by  Butenandt  in  1932  and  of  veratridine  by 

Barton,  Prelog  and  Woodward  in  1954.  Since  then,  the  system  of  screening  and 

synthesis of novel insecticides became well established and opened a new era of rapid 

advance that led to the current status of research on insecticides (Casida and Quistad, 

1998).  Perusal  of  literature  reveals  that  many  plants  have  been assessed  on  different 

stages of mosquitoes around the world. In this regard, Pavela (2009) has verified the 

efficacy  of  56  plant  species  collected  from  Euro-Asiatic  region  against  the  fourth 



General 

Introduction

 

10 

 

instar  larvae  of  Cx.  quinquefasciatus.  Evaluation  of  acetone  extracts  of  leaves  and 



seeds from Tribulus terrestris by Singh et al., (2002) showed that the seed extract was 

more  potent  than  that  of  the  leaf  against  third  instar  larvae  of  An.  culicifacies,  An. 



stephensi, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Aeaegypti at Delhi, India. Similarly, Kumar and 

Maneemegalai  (2008)  have  tested  Lantana  camara  extract  against  Cx. 



quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti in Tamil NaduThe leaf of Leucas aspera exhibited 

toxic effect against Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti in Tamil Nadu (Maheswaran 



et  al.,  2008).  Madhumathi  et  al.,  (2007)  have  also  reported  the  larvicidal  activity  of 

extracts  from  Capsicum  annum  against  An.  stephensi  and  Cx.  quinquefasciatus  at 

Mysore. Further Repellency effect of 41 plant extracts and 11 oil mixtures have been 

evaluated by Amer and Mehlhorn (2006) against Ae. aegypti,    An. stephensi and Cx. 



quinquefasciatus in Germany. The methanol extracts of Cassia fistula leaf have been 

found  to induce  larval  mortality  and  reduce egg  hatchability  in  Cx.  quinquefasciatus 

and  An.  stephensi  in  Tamil  Nadu  (Govindarajan,  2009).  The  studies  conducted  by 

Rajkumar  and  Jebanesan  (2009),  in  the  same  state  have  shown  larvicidal  and 

oviposition  deterrent activity  of  ethanol extracts of  Cassia  obtusifolia  leaf.  Similarly 

investigation  conducted  by  Prathibha  et  al.,  (2014)  have    also  shown  the  larvicidal, 

ovicidal  and  oviposition  deterrent  activity  of  petroleum  ether  and  ethyl  acetate 

extracts  of  Eugenia  jambolana,  Solidago  canadensis,  Euodia  ridleyi  leaf  and 



Spilanthes mauritiana flower against the three important vector mosquito species i.e., 

Cx. quinquefasciatusAn. stephensi and Ae. aegypti at Mysore.   

Though  literature  of  the  past  25  years  described  hundreds  of  isolated 

secondary  metabolites  that  showed  toxic  effects  to  insects  in  laboratory  bioassays, 

only a few plant products have reached the market and their efficacy has been found 

to be still lower than that of the currently used synthetic insecticides (Hassan, 2010). 


General 

Introduction

 

11 

 

However,  the  phytocompounds  are  more  exciting  for  chemists  because  of  structural 



complexity, potency, target specificity and ecofriendly nature. For example rotenone, 

ryanodine,  veratridine  and  azadirachtin  are  some  of  the  active  ingredients  isolated 

from cube, ryania, sabadilla and neem plants respectively. Rotenone, an isoflavanoid, 

extracted  from  derris  and  nicotine  from  Nicotiana  tabaccum  have  been  used  as 

insecticides for more than 150 years (Casida and Quistad, 1998). The oil extracts are 

generally  complex  mixtures  of  monoterpenes,  biogenetically  related  phenols  and 

sesquiterpenes.  Examples  for  insecticidal  oils  include  1,8-cineole,  from  rosemary 

(Rosmarinus  officinalis)  and  eucalyptus  oil  (Eucalyptus  globus); eugenol  from  clove 

oil  (Syzygium  aromaticum);  thymol  from  garden  thyme  (Thymus  vulgaris)  and 

menthol from various species of mint (Mentha species) (Isman, 2006). Other than the 

above  mentioned  phytoproducts,

 

with  insecticidal  property,  Saponan,  extracted  from 



Quillaja  saponaria  and  Balanites  aegyptiaca  have  been  reported  to  be  effective 

against Ae. aegypti and Cx. pipens in Israel (Wiesman and Chapagain, 2003). 

Perusal of literature further provides ample data on mosquitocidal potentiality 

of  South  Indian  plants.  Jaswanth  et  al.,  (2002)  have  monitored  the  susceptibility  of 



Cx. quinquefasciatus to methanol extracts of Annona squamosa leaf at Tiruchinapalli, 

Tamil  Nadu  state.  Pelargonium  citrosa  leaf  extract  was  evaluated  against  An. 



stephensi for larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibition in Tamil Nadu (Jayabalan et 

al.,  2003).  The  susceptibility  status  of  An.  stephensi  larvae  to  petroleum  ether, 

benzene,  chloroform,  acetone  and  alcohol  extracts  of  Vitex  nigundo  and  Gnidia 



glauca leaf has been evaluated at Mysore by Ganesh (2004). Nazar et al., (2009) have 

tested  the  extracts  of  100  coastal  plant  species  from  South  East  coast  of  India  for 

larvicidal activity against Cx. quinquefasciatus. Manilal et al., (2009) too have found 

that  13  seaweeds  collected  from  south  west  coast  regions  possessed  mosquito 



General 

Introduction

 

12 

 

larvicidal  efficacy.  Certain  secondary  metabolites  such  as  9-oxoneoprocurcumenol 



and  neoprocurcumenol  from  Curcuma  aromatica  from  Mysore  (Madhu  et  al.,  2010) 

and  Gluanol  acetate  from  Ficus  racemosa  (Rahuman  et  al.,  2008)  from  Tamil  Nadu 

have been found to possess larvicidal efficacy. 

In the light of the above-said information regarding the existing LF problem in 

the  region  and  the  rampant  breeding  of  Cx.  quinquefasciatus  vector  in  urban  and 

suburban localities, present project entitled on ‘Characterization of bioactive mosquito 

larvicidal  compounds  from  Euodia  ridleyi  Hochr  and  Spilanthes  mauritiana  Linn.’ 

was undertaken to find a possible ecofriendly solution. In this regard, detailed analysis 

has been carried out on  the vector concerned with respect to phytochemical activity, 

isolation of bioactive compound and selection experiment related to biochemical and 

isozyme differentiation.   

The objectives of the study are: 

1)

 

To find out larvicidal efficacy of leaf  of Euodia  ridleyi and flower extract of 



Spilanthes mauritiana on Culex quinquefasciatus

2)

 



To isolate and characterize bioactive compounds from the selected two plants 

and test their efficacy on the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus

3)

 

To  conduct  selection  experiments  with  an  isolated  botanical  or  crude  extract 



from  the  said  plants  in  order  to  study  the  resistance  development,  if  any, 

using bioassay and biochemical methods. 

 


General 

Introduction

 

13 

 

 

In order to satisfy the first objective, crude extracts of many locally available 



plants with suspected insecticidal efficacy were screened for their larvicidal effect and 

on  the  basis  of  the  results,  two  plants  were  selected  for  further  studies.  One  such 

species Euodia ridleyi is a purely ornamental plant of family Rutaceae. Leaf contains 

aromatic  oils  that  act  as  coolants  for  fevers,  as  lotions  for  the  improvement  of 

complexions and as tonics in the treatment of stomach complaints (Clay and Hubbard, 

1977).  Spilanthes  mauritiana  the  other  species  selected,  a  monogeneric-endangered 

herb belonging to the Asteraceae family, is a native of Eastern Africa and found to be 

useful  in  the  local  pharmacoepia  to  cure  infections  of  the  throat  and  mouth.  Amba 

tribes  in  Kenya  chew  the  flower  of  S.  mauritiana  for  the  relief  of  toothache  and  the 

treatment  of  pyorrhea  (Watt  and  Brayer-Brandwijk,  1962),  and  an  infusion  of  this 

herb is used as a febrifuge (Dalziel, 1937).    As there are no reports on the bioassay of 

solvent  extracts  and  characterization  of  bioactive  compounds  with  insecticidal 

properties on these two plant species, the present investigation was undertaken. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

                                                

Fig. 1:

 

 

 



 

 

 

                                                 

1:Life Cycle of Culex quinquefasciatus 

General 


Introduction 

14 



 

General 

Introduction 

15 

 

 

        



 

Open Drainage 

 

Sewage Tank 



Fig. 2: Breeding habitats of Culex quinquefasciatus at Mysore 

 

 

General 

Introduction 

16 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fig. 3: Transmission cycle of Filariasis depicting the role of Culex quinquefasciatus 

 

 

 

 

                                                              

   

 


General 

Introduction 

17 



 

         

 

 

 

Fig. 4: Clinical manifestation of lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə