Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area Values Study in the Cessnock Local Government Area and Surrounds



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Glossary


Biodiversity

The biological diversity of life is commonly regarded as being made up of the following three components:

Genetic diversity — the variety of genes (or units of heredity) in any population.

Species diversity — the variety of species.

Ecosystem diversity — the variety of communities or ecosystems.



Bioregion (region)

A bioregion defined in a national system of bioregionalisation. The study area is in the Sydney Basin bioregion as defined in the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia (Thackway & Cresswell 1995).

Complementary values

Complementary values are those natural values that support the integrity and resilience of World Heritage values.

Critical habitat

The whole or any part or parts of an area or areas of land comprising the habitat of an Endangered species, an Endangered population or an Endangered Ecological Community that is critical to the survival of the species, population or ecological community (Department of Environment and Conservation 2004). Critical habitat is listed under either the TSC Act or the EPBC Act and both the state (Office of Environment and Heritage) and Federal (Department of the Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities) Both of these departments maintain a register of this habitat. Capitalisation of the term ‘Critical Habitat’ in this report refers to the habitat listed specifically under the relevant state and Commonwealth legislation.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC)

The department develops and implements national policy, programs and legislation to protect and conserve Australia’s natural environment and cultural heritage and administers the EPBC Act. The Commonwealth Department of Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities was known previously as:

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA).

Department of Environment and Heritage (DEH).

Department of the Environment and Water Resources (DEWR).



Department of Trade and Investment (DTI)

This department aims to attract investment to NSW and support innovative, sustainable and globally competitive industries through technical knowledge. The department includes forestry and fisheries and administers the FM Act. Formerly known as:

Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services

Department of Industry and Investment.

Department of Primary Industries.



Ecological community

An assemblage of species occupying a particular area.

Environmental weed

Any plant that is not native to a local area that has invaded native vegetation.

Exotic

Introduced from outside the area (Stralberg et al. 2009). Used in the context of this report to refer to species introduced from overseas.

Global Positioning System (GPS)

A navigational tool which uses radio receivers to pick up signals from four or more special satellites to provide precise determination of location.

Habitat

An area or areas occupied, or periodically or occasionally occupied, by a species, population or ecological community, including any biotic or abiotic components.

Indigenous

Native to the area: not introduced (Stralberg et al. 2009).

Introduced

Not native to the area: not indigenous (Stralberg et al. 2009). Refers to both exotic and non-indigenous Australian native species of plants and animals.

Key threatening processes

A process that threatens, or could threaten, the survival, abundance or evolutionary development of native species, populations or ecological communities (Department of Environment and Conservation 2004). Key threatening processes are listed under the TSC Act, the FM Act and the EPBC Act. Capitalisation of the term ‘Key Threatening Processes’ in this report refers to those processes listed specifically under the relevant state and Commonwealth legislation.

Likely

Taken to be a real chance or possibility (Department of Environment and Conservation 2004).

Local population

The population that occurs within the site, unless the existence of contiguous or proximal occupied habitat and the movement of individuals or exchange of genetic material across the boundary can be demonstrated as defined by Department of Environment and Climate Change (2007c).

Locality

The area within a 10 km of the site.

Migratory species

Species listed as Migratory under the EPBC Act relating to international agreements to which Australia is a signatory. These include Japan-Australia Migratory Bird Agreement, China-Australia Migratory Bird Agreement, Republic of Korea-Australia Migratory Bird Agreement and the Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals. Capitalisation of the term ‘Migratory’ in this report refers to those species listed as Migratory under the EPBC Act.

Noxious weed

An introduced species listed under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. Under the Act, noxious weeds have specific control measure and reporting requirements.

Office of Environment and Heritage

Following the 2011 NSW elections, the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water was abolished as a Division of the Government Service and was added to the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet, as the Office of Environment and Heritage.

Broadly, the Office of Environment works towards a healthy environment cared for and enjoyed by the whole NSW community: manages the state’s natural resources, including biodiversity, soils and natural vegetation: manages natural and cultural heritage across the state’s land: acts to minimise the impacts of climate change: promotes sustainable consumption, resource use and waste management: regulates activities to protect the environment: and conducts biodiversity, plant, environmental and cultural heritage research to improve decision making.

Previously known as:

Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (DECCW).

Department of Environment and Climate Change (DECC)

National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS).



Priorities Action Statements

Priorities Action Statements outline the broad strategies and detailed priority actions to be undertaken in NSW to promote the recovery of threatened species, population and ecological communities and manage key threatening processes (Department of Environment and Climate Change 2007a)

Protected species

Those species defined as protected under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974. Includes all native animals, as well as all native plants listed on Schedule 13 of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

Recovery plan

A plan prepared under the TSC Act, FM Act or the EPBC Act to assist the recovery of a Threatened species, population or ecological community.

scleromorphic

Type of vegetation that has hard leaves and short internodes (the distance between leaves along the stem).

sensu lato

in the broad/broader/most broad sense

Significant

Important, weighty or more than ordinary as defined by Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (2007c).

Species richness

Species richness is simply the number of species present in a sample, community, or taxonomic group. Species richness is one component of the concept of species diversity, which also incorporates evenness, that is, the relative abundance of species (Matteson & Langellotto 2010).

Threatened biodiversity

Threatened species, populations or ecological communities as listed under the TSC Act, FM Act or the EPBC Act.

Threatened species, populations and ecological communities

Species, populations and ecological communities listed as Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered (collectively referred to as Threatened) under the TSC Act, FM Act or the EPBC Act. Capitalisation of the terms ‘Vulnerable’, ‘Endangered’ or ‘Critically Endangered’ in this report refers to listing under the relevant state and/or Commonwealth legislation.

Viable local population

A population that has the capacity to live, develop and reproduce under normal conditions, unless the contrary can be conclusively demonstrated through analysis of records and references (Department of Environment and Climate Change 2007c).

Weed

A plant growing out of place or where it is not wanted: often characterized by high seed production and the ability to colonise disturbed ground quickly (Stralberg et al. 2009). Weeds include both exotic and Australian native species of plant naturalised outside of their natural range.

World Heritage

World Heritage for the purposes of this project is defined as those lands within the Greater Blue Mountains Area as inscribed on the World Heritage List by the World Heritage Committee in 2000.


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