Habitat characteristics of the rare underground orchid Rhizanthella gardneri



Yüklə 379.41 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü379.41 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

 

 

 



Habitat characteristics of the rare underground orchid

Rhizanthella gardneri

Bougoure, J., Brundrett, M., Brown, A., & Grierson, P. (2008). Habitat characteristics of the rare underground

orchid Rhizanthella gardneri. Australian Journal of Botany, 56(6), 501-511. DOI: 10.1071/BT08031

Published in:

Australian Journal of Botany



DOI:

10.1071/BT08031

Link to publication in the UWA Research Repository

Rights statement

Post print of work supplied. Link to Publisher's website supplied in Alternative Location.



General rights

Copyright owners retain the copyright for their material stored in the UWA Research Repository. The University grants no end-user

rights beyond those which are provided by the Australian Copyright Act 1968. Users may make use of the material in the Repository

providing due attribution is given and the use is in accordance with the Copyright Act 1968.



Take down policy

If you believe this document infringes copyright, raise a complaint by contacting repository-lib@uwa.edu.au. The document will be

immediately withdrawn from public access while the complaint is being investigated.

Download date: 02. Sep. 2017



 



Habitat characteristics of the rare underground orchid, Rhizanthella 



gardneri 

 





Jeremy Bougoure

A,C

, Mark Brundrett

A

, Andrew Brown

B

 and Pauline F. Grierson



 

A

Ecosystems Research Group, School of Plant Biology M090, University of Western 



Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. 

B

Department of Environment and Conservation, Kensington, WA.  6151, Australia. 



C

Corresponding author. Email: bougoj01@student.uwa.edu.au 



 

10 



Abstract 

 

11 


Rhizanthella  gardneri  R.  S.  Rogers  is  an  entirely  subterranean  mycoheterotrophic 

12 


orchid  only  known  from  two  isolated  populations  within  south-west  Western 

13 


Australia. This rare species appears restricted to habitats dominated by species of the 

14 


Melaleuca  uncinata  complex.  Rhizanthella  gardneri  purportedly  forms  a  tripartite 

15 


relationship with Melaleuca

*

, via a connecting mycorrhizal fungus, for the purpose of 

16 

carbohydrate  and  nutrient  acquisition.    Here,  we  quantify  key  climate,  soil  and 



17 

vegetation  characteristics of known  R. gardneri  habitats  to  provide baseline data  for 

18 

monitoring  of  known  R.  gardneri  populations,  better  understand  how  R.  gardneri 



19 

interacts  with  its  habitat,  and  to  identify  possible  new  sites  for  R.  gardneri 

20 

introduction.  We  found  that  the  habitats  of  the  two  known  R.  gardneri  populations 



21 

show  considerable  differences  in  soil  chemistry,  Melaleuca  structure  and  Melaleuca 

22 

                                                 



*

 

Melaleuca’  in  this  paper  refers  to  the  various  species  of  the  Melaleuca  uncinata  complex  that 



Rhizanthella gardneri is known to associate with. 

 


 

productivity.  Multivariate  analyses  showed  that  both  MDS  and  PCA  ordinations  of 



soil  chemical  characteristics  were  very  similar.  Individual  sites  within  populations 

were relatively similar in all attributes measured while overall Northern and Southern 



habitats  were  distinct  from  each  other.  These  results  suggest  that  R.  gardneri  can 

tolerate a range of conditions and may be more widespread than previously thought, 



given  that  there  are  extensive  areas  of  Melaleuca  thickets  with  similar  habitat 

characteristics across south-western Western Australia. Variability within the habitats 



of known R. gardneri populations suggests translocation of this species into sites with 

similar vegetation may be a viable option for the survival of this species.  



 

10 



Introduction 

11 


 

12 


Many  orchid  species  are  on  the  brink  of  extinction  and  as  such  intervention  via 

13 


conservation  of  existing  populations,  identification  of  habitat  suitable  for  their 

14 


reintroduction  and  restoration  of  degraded  habitat  are  paramount  to  their  continued 

15 


survival  (Hágsater  and  Dumont  1996).  Restoration  and  conservation  of  individual 

16 


species, particularly threatened species, is generally complex and requires a thorough 

17 


understanding  of  the  biological  systems  and  processes  associated  with  both  their 

18 


continued  existence  and  reasons  for  decline  (Montalvo  et  al.  1997).  While 

19 


conservation  of  existing  populations  and  habitat  is  of  primary  importance,  there  is 

20 


also  an  increasing  need  for  ecological  restoration  and/or  translocation  of  individuals 

21 


produced  ex  situ  to  ensure  survival  and  proliferation  of  endangered  species  and 

22 


systems  (Young  2000).  However,  habitat  characteristics  for  many  rare  or  threatened 

23 


plants are often poorly characterised, particularly in terms of fundamental ecosystem 

24 


properties such as productivity, soil chemistry, and nutrient cycling.  

25 


 



 



Rhizanthella  gardneri  R.S.Rogers  (western  underground  orchid)  is  a  critically 

endangered orchid that is entirely subterranean and mycoheterotrophic, meaning that 



it has no ability to photosynthesise and limited capacity to independently access soil 

nutrient  pools  (Dixon  and  Pate  1990).  Rhizanthella  gardneri  and  the  only  other 



member of the genus, R. slateri (Rupp) M.A.Clem. & P.J.Cribb (eastern underground 

orchid), are unusual plants in that they remain subterranean during flowering (Fig. 1a) 



– a unique trait even amongst mycoheterotrophic species (Leake 1994). It is thought 

that  R.  gardneri  is  linked,  via  a  mycorrhizal  fungus  (Thanatephorus  gardneri 



Warcup),  to  an  autotrophic  shrub  (Melaleuca),  to  form  a  tripartite  relationship  of 

10 

nutrient and carbohydrate exchange (Warcup 1985, 1991; Dixon and Pate 1990). If R. 



11 

gardneri is indirectly dependent upon the surrounding shrubs for carbon and nutrients 

12 


then  we  need  an  increased  understanding  of  the  range  in  productivity  and  nutrient 

13 


availability of known habitat in order to restore, create or identify new habitat.  

14 


 

15 


Habitat  considerations  are  paramount  to  understanding  how  to  best  conserve  and 

16 


restore  populations  of  rare  plant  species  (Fielder  et  al.  2007),  including 

17 


mycoheterotrophic  species  (Leake,  1994).      Habitat  is  the  range  of  environments  or 

18 


communities  over  which  a  species  occurs  and  comprises  an  abstract  formulation  of 

19 


this  range  in  terms  of  environmental  variables  and  the  species’  limits  in  relation  to 

20 


them  (Whittaker  et  al.  1973).  Understanding  a  species’  limits  of  tolerance  and 

21 


responses to these environmental variables is paramount to understanding how species 

22 


function  and  in  predicting  how  they  may  behave  in  a  changing  environment.  In  the 

23 


case  of  R.  gardneri,  habitat  dependence  and  interactions  within  their  habitat  are 

24 


mostly  unknown,  but  like  most  plant  species,  dependent  variables  are  diverse,  with 

25 


 

nutrition,  climate  and  biotic  interactions  probably  most  important.  While  there  are 



comprehensive  climate records  for  all known  R. gardneri  sites,  the nutritional  status 

and  productivity  of  R.  gardneri  habitats,  i.e.,  the  capacity  of  the  habitat  to  maintain 



nutrient and carbon supply under field conditions, remains unknown.   

 



The  need  for  restoration  of  R.  gardneri  populations  and  surrounding  habitat  has 

become increasingly apparent. Monitoring over the past 26 years has identified a suite 



of intensifying threats to the survival and proliferation of R. gardneri including; small 

population  sizes,  changes  in  rainfall  distribution  (Australian  Bureau  of  Meteorology 



2008),  limited  capability  for  recruitment  due  to  habitat  fragmentation,  isolated 

10 

habitats  in  excessively  cleared  landscapes,  possible  encroachment  by  salinisation, 



11 

increased weed species competition, unsuitable fire management and herbicide aerial 

12 

spray drift (Brown et al. 1998). Populations of R. gardneri have purportedly been in 



13 

decline  since  monitoring  began  in  1979,  with  anecdotal  evidence  suggesting  that 

14 

decreased  sightings  of  R.  gardneri  are  correlated  to  a  decline  in  health  of  the 



15 

associated Melaleuca habitat. Declining Melaleuca ‘health’ has been associated with 

16 

casual  observations  of  a  reduced  litter  layer,  diminishing  ground  cover  of  other 



17 

species,  decreased  density  of  thickets,  limited  recruitment  and  the  yellowing  of 

18 

foliage.  However,  there  have  been  no  quantitative  or  qualitative  measurements  of 



19 

either  the  structure  or  nutritional  status  of  known  R.  gardneri  habitats,  or  to  what 

20 

extent  habitat  that  is  deemed  healthy  differs  from  that  in  decline.  Consequently,  we 



21 

assessed  vegetation  structure,  productivity  and  soil  nutrients  of  known  R.  gardneri 

22 

habitats.  We  sought  to  determine  key  similarities  and  differences  among  habitats  to 



23 

help define prerequisites and limitations to the survival of R. gardneri and to identify 

24 

new R. gardneri populations and potential sites for R. gardneri introduction.  



25 

 

 





Materials and methods 



 



Study sites  

Field  sites  analysed  in  this  study  represent  habitat  of  all  known  live  R.  gardneri 



individuals  during  2007.  Rhizanthella  gardneri  has  been  found  in  only  two  areas  of 

south-west  Western  Australia;  three  sites  within  30  km  of  Corrigin  in  the  northern 



wheatbelt  (Northern  Population)  and  three  sites  approximately  80  km  east  of 

Ravensthorpe  in  the  south-eastern  wheatbelt  (Southern  Population)  (Fig.  1c).  The 



Northern  and  Southern  populations  are  300  km  apart  with  many  areas  of  apparently 

10 

similar habitat between these sites; however, there are no records of R. gardneri from 



11 

these  intervening  areas.  The  six  sites  where  R.  gardneri  is  known  to  occur  are 

12 

between one and eight hectares in area and are generally within vegetation remnants 



13 

directly  adjacent  to  agricultural  land.  Two  sites  are  located  on  private  property 

14 

(Dallinup  Creek  North  and  South);  two  sites  are  in  protected  Nature  Reserves 



15 

(Babakin and Sorenson’s Reserve); and two sites are located on Unallocated Crown 

16 

Land  (Oldfield  River  and  Kunjin).  None  of  the  sites  have  been  directly  affected  by 



17 

fire in the past 30 years. However, similar surrounding vegetation that has been burnt 

18 

in the past 30 years has rapidly and successfully regenerated. 



19 

 

20 



Both  the  Northern  and  Southern  sites  are  subject  to  a  Mediterranean  type  climate 

21 


(wet,  cool  winters  with  hot,  dry  summers)  as  experienced  by  most  of  south-west 

22 


Western Australia. The Northern sites receive ~320-350 mm annual rainfall compared 

23 


to ~400-450 mm for the Southern sites. However, annual rainfall is quite variable and 

24 


it is not uncommon for any of the sites to receive > 150 mm of rain during typically 

25 


 

dry summer months (Australian Bureau of Meteorology 2008). Seasonal temperature 



fluctuations at Northern sites range from 5-15 

o

C in winter and 15-32



  o

C in summer. 

Climate  conditions  for  the  Southern  sites  are  slightly  milder  with  average  winter 



temperatures  as  low  as  7-16 

o

C  during  winter  and  14-28 



o

C  during  summer 

(Australian Bureau of Meteorology 2008). 



 



The Northern populations of R. gardneri occur in dense Melaleuca scalena Craven & 

Lepschi  thickets  (Fig.  2b)  whereas  the  Southern  populations  occur  in  thickets  of  M. 





hamata Fielding & Gardner, M. uncinata R.Br. and/or a third apparently undescribed 

species of the M. uncinata complex (Craven et al. 2004). All of the above Melaleuca 



10 

species are taxonomically similar and belong to the M. uncinata complex, a group of 

11 

species  widely  distributed  throughout  southern  Australia  (Craven  et  al.  2004; 



12 

Broadhurst  et  al.  2004).  The  six  sites,  encompassing  both  Northern  and  Southern 

13 

populations,  although primarily thickets  of  Melaleuca,  also  include more  open areas 



14 

dominated  by  smaller  Dryandra  spp.,  large  exposed  rocks,  areas  of  grasses  and 

15 

sedges,  Allocasuarina  campestris  (Diels)  L.  A.  S.  Johnson  thickets  or  occasional 



16 

larger  Banksia  media  R.Br.  and/or  mallee  eucalypts.  However,  it  appears  that  the 

17 

occurrence  of  R.  gardneri  plants  is  specific  to  the  Melaleuca  dominated  patches 



18 

within each site. 

19 

 

20 



Soils at all six sites are generally white-grey sandy loam over a shallow heavy orange-

21 


grey clay layer. The clay layer at the Dallinup Creek north and south sites (Southern 

22 


sites) is within a few centimetres of the surface and is hard-setting, so that water often 

23 


pools  on  the  soil  surface  for  a  substantial  time  after  heavy  rainfall.  However,  these 

24 


sites are on slight slopes, which allows for some degree of drainage. Soils at Northern 

25 


 

sites  are  considerably  sandier  than  the  loamy  soils  at  Southern  sites,  although  they 



often form hard surface crusts during prolonged dry spells, especially during summer. 

A  summary  of  the  general  site  characteristics  of  the  Northern  and  Southern 



populations of R. gardneri, including historical information, is given in Table 1. 



 



Aboveground structure and productivity of Melaleuca thickets 

Three  replicate  plots  of  10  m  x  10  m  were  established  within  Melaleuca  thickets  at 



each  of  the  six  sites.  Shrub  density,  canopy  cover,  stem  number  and  height  were 

measured  for  ten  Melaleuca  shrubs  within  each  10  m  x  10  m  plot.  The  biomass  of 





Melaleuca  at  each  site  was  estimated  by  destructively  sampling  five  individuals, 

10 


representative  of  the  range  of  canopy  areas,  and  measuring  their  above  ground 

11 


biomass. Individual plants were separated into foliage and stem components, weighed 

12 


and a sub-sample of foliage measured for total leaf area using a Li-3100 Area Meter 

13 


(Li-Cor Inc, Nebraska). The sub-sample of leaves was then oven dried at 70 

o

C for 48 



14 

hours,  and  specific  leaf  area  (m

2

  kg


-1

)  was  calculated  for  each  shrub.  Leaf  area  per 

15 

shrub was calculated as specific leaf area x total dry leaf mass. 



16 

 

17 



Standing leaf litter was measured by collecting all litter within 50 cm x 50 cm squares 

18 


at  0, 50 and 100 cm  distance from  randomly selected  Melaleuca  shrubs from  within 

19 


each  of  the  three  plots  at  each  site.  Litter  was  sorted  into  principal  (Melaleuca

20 


components (leaves, fruits, twigs) and those of other species (leaves and fruit) before 

21 


being oven dried at 60 

o

C for 48 hours and then weighed.  



22 

 

23 



Melaleuca root and living fungal biomass in Melaleuca thickets 

24 


Root biomass (< 2 mm diameter) was estimated from cores collected in June 2005 to 

25 


 

coincide with R. gardneri flowering and when soil moisture was consistently greatest. 



Duplicate soil cores (7.5 cm diameter) were sampled 10, 25, 50 and 100 cm in a south 

westerly  direction  from  three  randomly  selected  Melaleuca  shrubs  from  each  of  the 



three  plots  at  each  of  the  six  sites.  Cores  were  bulked  by  position  within  each  plot 

after  separating  into  0-5  cm  and  5-15  cm  depths  for  measurement  of  root  biomass. 



Leaf litter depth (mm) was also recorded at all sampling points. Roots were separated 

from soil by sieving samples (< 1 mm) under running water, and hand-sorting roots. 



Root  samples  were  then  oven  dried  at  60 

o

C  for  48  hours  and  all  roots  <  2  mm 



diameter  were  weighed.  The  gravimetric  moisture  content  of  sampled  soils  was 

calculated after drying for 24 hours at 110 



o

C. 


10 

 

11 


Living fungal biomass from a subsample of each of the 0-5 cm soil cores mentioned 

12 


above  was  estimated  from  ergosterol  concentrations  (Seitz  et  al.  1977).  Duplicate 

13 


samples  of  5-6  g  of  field  moist  soils  were  weighed  out.  One  duplicate  of  soil  was 

14 


amended  with  100  µg  ergosterol  in  1  mL  n-hexane-propan-2-ol  (98:2  v/v)  to 

15 


determine  extraction  and  recovery  efficiency.  Ergosterol  was  then  extracted  and 

16 


quantified  by  reverse  phase  HPLC  using  the  method  described  by  Ruzicka  et  al. 

17 


(1995)  as  modified  by  Grierson  and  Adams  (2000).  Ergosterol  recovery  of  ‘spiked’ 

18 


samples  (used  to  assess  ergosterol  extraction  efficiency)  was  always  greater  than  75 

19 


%.  

20 


 

21 


Soil chemistry analysis 

22 


Three  samples  from  each  of  the  three  plots  at  each  site  were  collected  using  7.5  cm 

23 


diameter metal corers, separated into 0-2, 2-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths, and bulked 

24 


by  plot  and  depth  prior  to  sieving  (<  2  mm).  Soils  were  then  assayed  for  a  range  of 

25 


 

chemical  attributes.  The  pH  of  5  g  fresh  soil  was  measured  after  vigorously  mixing 



samples with deionised water (1:1) (Thomas 1996). Labile phosphorus was measured 

using  two  techniques.  First,  labile  inorganic  P  (Bray  P



i

)  was  measured  according  to 

the  method  of  Bray  and  Kurtz  (1945).  Briefly,  air  dry  soil  was  mixed  with  an 



extraction solution (0.03 N NH

4

F and 0.1 N HCl), shaken for 45 seconds and filtered 



immediately.  Second,  labile  organic  and  inorganic  hydroxide-extractable  P  fractions 

were  measured  using  the  method  described  by  Grierson  and  Adams  (2000).  Briefly, 



10 g of soil in 50 mL of 0.1 M NaOH solutions were shaken for 16 hours after which 

extractions  were  centrifuged  and  the  supernatant  removed  via  filtration.  One  aliquot 



(OH-P


i

)  of  the  filtered  supernatant  was  acidified  with  HCl,  to  precipitate  organic 

10 

matter,  and  re-filtered.  A  second  aliquot  (OH-P



t

)  of  the  filtered  supernatant  was 

11 

digested  (H



2

SO

4



/H

2

O



2

).  Phosphorus  in  all  extracts  was  measured  using  a  modified 

12 

ascorbic  acid  method  of  Kuo  (1996).  Organic  P  (OH-P



o

)  was  estimated  as  the 

13 

difference in P between OH-P



and OH-P


i

14 



 

15 


Labile  inorganic  nitrogen  was  extracted  according  to  the  method  described  by 

16 


Rayment  and  Higginson  (1992).  Briefly,  5.0  g  fresh  soil  in  50  mL  of  1M  KCl  was 

17 


shaken  for  1  h  and  filtered  before  supernatant  NH

4

+



-N  and  NO

3

-



-N  concentrations 

18 


were  determined  by  automated  colorimetric  techniques  performed  on  a  Technicon 

19 


Auto Analyser II (Technicon 1977). 

20 


 

21 


Soil  and  litter  samples  were  analysed  for  total  N  and  C  content  (%),  and 

15



N  and 

22 


13

C  isotope  signatures,  using  an  Automated  Nitrogen  Carbon  Analyser-Mass 



23 

Spectrometer  consisting  of  a  Roboprep  connected  with  a  Tracermass  isotope  ratio 

24 

spectrometer  (Europa  Scientific  Ltd.,  Crewe,  UK)  in  the  West  Australian 



25 

 

10 


Biogeochemistry  Centre  at  the  University  of  Western  Australia.  All  samples  were 

standardised against a secondary reference of Radish collegate (3.167 % N, 



15

N 5.71; 



41.51  %  C, 

13

C  -28.61)



 

that  was  in  turn  standardised  against  primary  analytical 

standards  (IAEA,  Vienna).  Accuracy  was  measured  at  0.07  %,  while  precision  was 



measured  at  0.03  %,  according  to  the  stipulations  for  reporting  analytical  error  in 

stable isotope analysis outlined by Jardine and Cunjak (2005).  





 



Data analysis 

The  best  models  for  predicting  component  biomass  of  Melaleuca  based  on  canopy 



area  as  the independent  variable were determined after testing a number  of different 

10 

allometric  models.  The  allometric  models  that  best  fitted  the  data  were  chosen  by 



11 

examining  residual  distributions  and  maximum  adjusted  r

2

.  The  behaviour  of  the 



12 

models  for  small  diameter  and  "out  of  sampled  range"  trees  were  also  carefully 

13 

examined. The models tested were; y = a + band y = a + bx + cx



2

; where x is total 

14 

canopy area (m



2

), y is the mass of different components of sample shrubs, a, b and c 

15 

are constants.  



16 

 

17 



Analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  was  used  to  suggest  site  differences  among 

18 


Melaleuca  individual  and  thicket  structure,  biomass  (Melaleuca  aboveground, 

19 


Melaleuca  fine  roots  (<  2mm),  leaf  litter  and  fungus)  and  soil  nutrient  measures 

20 


among sites. In all cases, data were first checked for normality and square root or log 

21 


transformed  where  necessary  to  improve  homogeneity  of  variances.  For  analyses 

22 


where  samples  were  divided  into  depths  (soil  analyses)  or  distance  from  Melaleuca 

23 


stems  (standing  litter  biomass,  root  biomass,  ergosterol  concentrations),  two-way 

24 


ANOVA  was used to  determine if there was significant  interaction between the two 

25 


 

11 


independent variables. Significance level for all analyses was  

 0.05 and Statview 



5.0 software (SAS Institute 1996) was used for all statistical analyses.  

 



Multivariate  analyses  were  used  to  investigate  overall  similarities  and  differences 

among sites. Similarity of the soil characteristics of Northern and Southern  sites was 



calculated  using  principal  components  analysis  and  non-metric  multidimensional 

scaling  ordinations  (Primer  software  version  6.2,  Primer-E  Ltd,  Clarke  and  Gorley 



2006).  Analysis  of  similarity  (ANOSIM)  was  performed  to  determine  if  samples 

within  groups  were  more  similar  than  between  groups.  Similarity  percentages 



(SIMPER)  analysis  was  used  to  determine  contribution  of  individual  variables  to 

10 

dissimilarity of groups. Data were normalised prior to analysis and Euclidean distance 



11 

was used to generate the resemblance matrix for data (Clarke and Gorley 2006). 

12 

 

13 


  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə