Health monitoring program



Yüklə 0.76 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/6
tarix03.09.2017
ölçüsü0.76 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

HEALTH MONITORING PROGRAM 

2014 

 

F Q M   A U S T R A L I A   N I C K E L   P T Y   L T D



 

M A R C H   2 0 1 5  



TEL.

 (08) 9315 4688 

 

office@woodmanenv.com.au 



PO Box 50, Applecross WA 6953 

www.woodmanenv.com.au 



FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

 

DOCUMENT REVISION HISTORY 

 

Revision 



Description 

Originator

Internal 

Reviewer 

Internal 

Review 

Date 

Client 

Reviewer 

Client 

Review 

Date 

Rev A 


Draft report 

BL

CG/GW



5/3/2015

Tony 


Petersen 

6/03/2015

Rev 0 

Final report 



BL

GW

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Report Reference:  

FQM14‐33‐01 

Cover Photographs:   Clockwise from top left – Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea monitoring 

quadrat; flowers; typical yellowing of leaves on growing tip; fruit 

(Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd) 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

DISCLAIMER 

 

This  document  is  prepared  in  accordance  with  and  subject  to  an  agreement  between 



Woodman  Environmental  Consulting  Pty  Ltd  (“Woodman  Environmental”)  and  the  client  for 

whom it has been prepared (“FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd”) and is restricted to those issues 

that  have  been  raised  by  the  Client  in  its  engagement  of  Woodman  Environmental  and 

prepared using the standard of skill and care ordinarily exercised by Environmental Scientists 

in the preparation of such Documents. 

 

Any organisation or person that relies on or uses this document for purposes or reasons other 



than those agreed by Woodman Environmental and the Client without first obtaining the prior 

written consent of Woodman Environmental, does so entirely at their own risk and Woodman 

Environmental denies all liability in tort, contract or otherwise for any loss, damage or injury 

of  any  kind  whatsoever  (whether  in  negligence  or  otherwise)  that  may  be  suffered  as  a 

consequence  of  relying  on  this  document  for  any  purpose  other  than  that  agreed  with  the 

Client. 


FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1.

 

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ....................................................... 1

 

1.1


 

 OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................. 1

 

2.

 

MONITORING PROGRAM ........................................................................ 1

 

3.

 

METHODS ............................................................................................... 2

 

3.1


 

 QUADRAT ESTABLISHMENT ......................................................................................... 2

 

3.2


 

 PLANT COLLECTION, LICENSING AND NOMENCLATURE ............................................. 4

 

3.3


 

 MONITORING ............................................................................................................... 4

 

3.3.1 

Health Ranking ................................................................................................................... 4 

3.3.2 

Quadrat Health .................................................................................................................. 6 

3.3.3 

Plant Health ........................................................................................................................ 6 

3.3.4 

Multispectral Imagery Interpretation ............................................................................... 7 

3.4


 

RAINFALL DATA ............................................................................................................. 8

 

4.

 

RESULTS .................................................................................................. 9

 

4.1


 

QUADRAT HEALTH ........................................................................................................ 9

 

4.2


 

PLANT HEALTH ............................................................................................................ 10

 

4.3


 

RAINFALL ..................................................................................................................... 12

 

4.4


 

MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY RESULTS ........................................................................... 13

 

4.4.1 

Interpretation of 2013 VCD Image ..................................................................................13 

4.4.1.1


 

 Correlation with Rainfall ........................................................................................................................... 16

 

4.4.2 

Interpretation of 2014 VCD Image ..................................................................................16 

4.4.2.1


 

 Correlation with Health Monitoring ......................................................................................................... 16

 

4.4.2.2


 

 Correlation with Rainfall ........................................................................................................................... 17

 

5.

 

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS ........................................................... 17

 

6.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................ 19

 

7.

 

REFERENCES .......................................................................................... 20

 

 

Tables 

Table 1: 

Site Selection of Quadrats 

Table 2: 

Personnel and Licensing Information 

Table 3: 

Quadrat Vegetation Health Score Ranking Scale 

Table 4: 

Plant Health Score Ranking Scale 

Table 5: 

Plant Health Monitoring Parameters 

 

 



FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

 

Appendices 

Appendix A:  Photographic  Representation  of  Fecundity  Classifications  and 

Upright Stems 

Appendix B:  Pseudo‐colour Change Detection Scale Range 

Appendix C:  Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea

 

Monitoring 2014 Raw Data 



Appendix D:  Photographic Record of Plots 2014 

Appendix E:   Photographic Representation of Plant and Foliage Death 

Appendix F:  Photographic Representation of Ground‐truthed Points 

Charts 

Chart 1: 

Monthly and Mean Annual Rainfall for Ravensthorpe (Bureau of 

Meteorology 2015) 



Figures 

Figure 1: 

Field  Location  of  Quadrats  and  2013  0.5m  Pseudo‐colour  Image 

(2012‐2013 Change) 

Figure 2: 

2013 0.2m Pseudo‐colour Image (2012‐2013 Change) 

Figure 3: 

2014 0.2m Pseudo‐colour Image (2013‐2014 Change) 

Figure 4: 

2014 0.2m Pseudo‐colour Image (2012‐2014 Change) 

 


FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

1

 



1.

 

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 

FQM Nickel Australia Pty Ltd’s (FQM) Ravensthorpe Nickel Operations have approval under 

Part  IV  of  the  Environmental  Protection  Act  1986  (EP  Act)  for  their  lateritic  nickel  mining 

operations  near  Ravensthorpe.    A  condition  of  operation  is  to  monitor  the  health  of 

populations  of  the  Threatened  ‐  Declared  Rare  Flora  (T‐DRF)  taxon  Kunzea  similis  subsp. 

mediterranea.    The  operation  currently  has  an  agreed  monitoring  program  for  this  taxon 

focusing on transect based sampling conducted on a quarterly basis. 

 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd (Woodman Environmental) were commissioned 



to  design  a  less  intensive  and  intrusive  monitoring  program  to  monitor  the  health  of  the 

naturally  occurring  population  of  Kunzea  similis  subsp.  mediterranea  (Kunzea)  within  the 

Kunzea  Conservation  Area,  that  could  be  used  in  conjunction  with  remote  sensing 

multispectral  imagery  (flown  annually  in  October)  to  track  vegetation  health  on  an  annual 

basis. 

 

Following  a  review  of  the  existing  monitoring  program  parameters  and  historical  results 



(Western Botanical 2008), a revised method utilising a quadrat based sampling regime with 

parameters  designed  to  be  repeatable,  reduce  observer  variation  during  monitoring,  limit 

errors in interpretation of parameters by different recorders, and take into account the form 

of  the  taxon,  was  proposed  (Woodman  Environmental  2014).    This  report  details  the  new 

methods and 2014 monitoring results (baseline sampling) for the program. 

1.1  

Objectives 

The  objectives  required  to  fulfil  the  condition  of  monitoring  the  health  of  Kunzea  similis 

subsp. mediterranea include: 

 



Establish a new monitoring method to reduce variations and errors in results due to 

human sampling, and to increase time effectiveness; 

 

Conduct baseline monitoring of the population during Spring 2014 utilising the new 



method; and  

 



Prepare  a  report  documenting  the  methods  and  results  of  the  initial  sampling,  and 

recommendations for additional investigations if deemed appropriate.  

 

2.

 

MONITORING PROGRAM 

The monitoring program incorporates 2 distinct aspects (interpretation of remotely sensed 

multispectral imagery / field observation of vegetation and plant health) that are compared 

to  each  other.    The  program  is  designed  to  provide  correlation  of  multispectral  data  with 

field observations which will allow the use of the multispectral data as a monitoring tool in 

the absence of annual field monitoring.  Field monitoring would therefore become a regular 

(every  3  to  5  years)  check  on  the  multispectral  data  and  also  a  response  to  observed 

significant change in vegetation health when indicated by the remote sensing imagery. 

 

The  first  aspect  (multispectral  imagery)  is  utilised  to  provide  an  overview  of  the  Kunzea 



Conservation  Zone,  focussing  on  general  vegetation  health.    The  vegetation  health  is 

FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

2

 



interpreted from data presented in the imagery on photosynthesising plant cell density, with 

changes in health identified from comparison of digital images collected over time. 

 

The  second  aspect  (field  observation)  involves  the  use  of  a  plant  and  vegetation  health 



ranking  system  applied  to  a  set  of  small  portions  (subsamples/quadrats)  of  the  Kunzea 

population to assess visual symptoms of vegetation health/stress. 

 

The  monitoring  program  design  was  initially  provided  to  FQM  in  a  separate  report 



(Woodman Environmental 2014) that described the approach and proposed data collection 

and analysis methods.  Some aspects of the proposed design have been modified to reflect 

field conditions and these revised methods are described below. 

3.

 

METHODS 

3.1  

Quadrat Establishment 

Identification  of  potential  sampling  locations  (quadrats)  within  the  Conservation  Area 

involved inspection of existing remote sensing data at 0.2m pixels (the 2013 pseudo‐colour 

image  showing  changes  in  vegetation  from  2012  to  2013,  specifically  plant  cell  density 

(loss/gain  of  leaves))  in  conjunction  with  previously  prepared  Kunzea  population  polygons 

(Western  Botanical  2008).    Proposed  sampling  locations  were  chosen  to  incorporate  areas 

that appeared to be healthy and also areas that appeared to be distressed (as per the 2013 

pseudo‐colour  image)  to  provide  an  overview  of  the  population  health  and  also  to  help 

calibrate  the  monitoring  method.    Another  parameter  utilised  in  the  selection  of  sampling 

sites  was  proximity  to  areas  of  mine  activity  in  order  to  monitor  or  gauge  the  effects  of 

mining activities, both direct and indirect on the community and the Kunzea itself (i.e. dust, 

spread of Dieback, altered hydrological regimes, disturbance).   

 

Quadrats  locations  were  spread  across  the  Kunzea  population  to  measure  variation  and 



incorporated some of the original transect locations (Western Botanical 2008).  Six quadrats 

were initially proposed, three placed in vegetation showing signs of foliage loss and three in 

vegetation  in  good  health  (foliage  gain)  based  on  the  vegetation  change  detection  (VCD) 

multispectral image, with one of each in proximity to the original monitoring transects.  Final 

selection  of  quadrat  locations  was  determined  on‐site  following  a  reconnaissance  of  the 

Kunzea Conservation Area in conjunction with the 2013 0.5m pixel VCD pseudo‐colour image 

which gave the impression of more drastic change from 2012 to 2013 (see Section 2.2.4).    

 

A  total  of  eight  quadrats  measuring  10m  x  10m  were  established  during  the  field 



assessment,  with  30  individual  plants  tagged  and  monitored  within  each  quadrat.    Table  1 

presents quadrat location information and justification for site selection.  Figure 1 presents 

the quadrat locations in conjunction with the 2013 0.5m pixel VCD pseudo‐colour image.   

 

 


FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

3

 



 

Table 1: 

Site Selection of Quadrats 

 

Quadrat 

Original 

Transect 

Vegetation Health* 

Other Parameter 

Q1 


 

Potentially distressed ‐ Intense 

area  of  red  on  imagery 

indicating reduction of foliage) 

Located  on  northern  edge  of  population 

adjacent  to  cleared  area;  potentially 

prone  to  dust,  altered  hydrology  and 

future ground disturbance/excavation 

Q2 



Possibly  slightly  stressed  ‐ 



Area  with  yellow  patches  on 

imagery 


Located  on  northern  edge  of  population 

adjacent  to  cleared  area;  potentially 

prone  to  dust,  altered  hydrology  and 

future ground disturbance/excavation 

Q3 

 

Probably  healthy  vegetation  ‐ 



Area of green with little to no 

yellow  or  red  present  on 

imagery 

Objective  to  observe  any  differences  in 

vegetation  health  between  Q3  and  Q4 

given  distinction  in  imagery  along  track 

(i.e. N versus S) 

Q4 


Possibly  slightly  stressed  ‐ 

Area  with  yellow  patches  on 

imagery 


Located  towards  eastern  edge  of  the 

population and located adjacent to a haul 

road 

Q5 


 

Possibly  slightly  stressed  ‐ 

Area  with  yellow  patches  on 

imagery 


Located  on  western  slope/change  of 

slope;  near  northern  edge  of  the 

population  with  potential  of  future 

ground disturbance adjacent 

Q6 



Probably  healthy  vegetation  ‐ 



Area of green with little to no 

yellow  or  red  present  on 

imagery 

Located  near  northern  edge  of  the 

population  with  potential  of  future 

ground disturbance adjacent 

Q7 



Probably  healthy  vegetation  ‐ 



Area of green with little to no 

yellow  or  red  present  on 

imagery 

Located  on  southern  slope;  to  the  south 

of potential future ground disturbance 

Q8 


 

Probably  healthy  vegetation  ‐ 

Area of green with little to no 

yellow  or  red  present  on 

imagery 

Located 


towards 

the 


centre 

of 


Conservation  Area  away  from  any 

potential direct impacts of mining 

* ‐ Based on the 2013 0.5m pixel VCD pseudo colour image 

 

Initially,  quadrat  dimensions  of  20m  x  20m  were  proposed  in  order  to  capture  a  suitable 



sample size of at least 5‐10 plants/quadrat (Woodman Environmental 2014).  However, once 

in the field the density of plants was found to be extremely high, with plant numbers within 

a 20m x 20m quadrat too large (100+) to effectively monitor all plants present.  Monitoring 

of  individuals  was  therefore  restricted  to  30  plants  per  quadrat,  regardless  of  the  total 

number of plants in the quadrat, to establish consistency between quadrats for comparative 

purposes  and  limit  monitoring  time.    The  smaller  quadrat  dimensions  will  also  assist  with 

relocating plants in subsequent monitoring periods given the extremely dense nature of the 

vegetation. 

 

The quadrats were orientated along cardinal points with a pink pin dropper placed in each 



corner  and  pink  flagging  tape  tied  above  the  location  of  each  pin  dropper.    A  quadrat 

FQM Australia Nickel Pty Ltd  

 

Kunzea similis subsp. mediterranea 

 

 

Health Monitoring Program 2014 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

4

 



identifier (unique number) was labelled on the north‐west pin dropper, with a photograph of 

the  quadrat  and  its  vegetation  taken  from  this  corner  towards  the  south‐east  corner.    A 

structural description of the vegetation, with identification of dominant taxa, was recorded 

to describe and characterise the vegetation associated with the Kunzea in each quadrat.   

 

Each Kunzea to be monitored was demarcated with pink flagging tape and a labelled ear tag 



(with unique identifier number) attached to an upright stem.  A number of existing tagged 

plants (with ear tags) from the original monitoring transects were utilised.  The GPS location 

of each plant was also recorded, utilising a hand‐held GPS.  A total of 240 Kunzea individuals 

were demarcated for monitoring. 



3.2  

Plant Collection, Licensing and Nomenclature 

Specimens of dominant taxa were collected for positive identification under scientific licence 

pursuant to the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 Section 23C and Section 23F as listed in Table 

2.  Taxon nomenclature generally follows Florabase (DPaW 2015b) with all names checked 

against the current DPaW Max database to ensure their validity.  However, in cases where 

names of plant taxa have been published recently in scientific literature but have not been 

adopted  on  Florabase  (DPaW  2015),  nomenclature  in  the  published  literature  is  followed.  

The  conservation  status  of  each  taxon  was  checked  against  Florabase,  which  provides  the 

most  up‐to‐date  information  regarding  the  conservation  status  of  flora  taxa  in  Western 

Australia.   

 

  1   2   3   4   5   6


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə