Imagination, Form, Movement and Sound



Yüklə 23.48 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/32
tarix26.07.2017
ölçüsü23.48 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Imagination, Form,  
Movement and Sound 
Studies in Musical Improvisation 
 
 
 
 
 

II
 
 

III 
 
 
 
 
Imagination, Form,  
Movement and Sound 
 
Studies in Musical Improvisation 
 
 
Svein Erik Tandberg 
 
Academy of Music and Drama, Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, 
University of Gothenburg 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

IV
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Musical Performance and Inter-
pretation at the Academy of Music and Drama, Faculty of Fine, Applied and Per-
forming Arts, University of Gotheburg 
 
ArtMonitor is a publication series from the Board for Artistic Research (NKU), 
Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts, University of Gotheburg 
Publisher: Johan Öberg 
Address: ArtMonitor 
University of Gothenburg 
Konstnärliga fakultetskansliet 
Box 141 
405 30 Göteborg 
www.konst.gu.se 
 
Recording and digital editing: Kai Schüler 
Translation: Richard Morgan 
Design: Sara Lund 
Cover: Detail from Eila Hiltunen’s Sibelius-Monument, “Passio Musicae” 1967. 
Reproduced with kind permission from Helsinki City Art Museum. Photo: Yehia 
Eweis  
CD Covers: A 19
th
 Century Christmas Service: Detail from the organ façade in Haga 
Church, Gothenburg. Photo: Jost Papmehl. Reproduced by kind permission of 
Haga Church Council; Contrasts on an historic ground: from the Oseberg Ship. 
Photo: Mekonnen Wolday. Reproduced by kind permission of Vestfold County 
Museum; Missa sacra et profana CD I and II:  The altar piece in Eik Church, Tøns-
berg, by the artist Per-Odd Aarrestad. Photograph by Svein Carlsen. Reproduced 
with kind permission of the artist and Slagen Church Council 
Layout: Anna Frisk 
Printed by: Intellecta Docusys, Gothenburg 2008 
 Svein Erik Tandberg, 2008 
ISBN: 978-91-975-911-8-8  
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dedicated to my organ teacher Franz Lehrndorfer 
 
 

VI
 
Abstract 
Title: Imagination, Form, Movement and Sound: Studies in Musical Improvisation 
Language: English 
Keywords: Aesthetic, artistic research, chronology versus phenomenology, cogni-
tive models, cross-modality, imitation, improvisation, motor programmes, organ, 
organ textbooks, procedural knowledge, Protestant practices, Roman Catholic 
practices, schemas, style, Johann Sebastian Bach, Anton Bruckner, Marcel Dupré, 
Rolande Falcinelli, César Franck, Johann Georg Herzog, Hermann Keller, Olivier 
Latry, Conrad Paumann, Max Reger, Heinz Wunderlich, Ruth Zechlin 
ISBN: 978-91-975-911-8-8 
 
How does one improvise? How can one learn the art of improvisation? By consid-
ering these two questions this thesis aspires to make a contribution towards a 
greater understanding of what the production of improvised music actually in-
volves. The organ has long traditions as an instrument on which music is impro-
vised, and this study aims to focus primarily on organ improvisation. It is assumed 
that spontaneous impulses, rational thought and an extensive array of physical 
movements have their origins in the emotional, intellectual and physical aspects of 
a person. These different facets of a person, which continually interact with and 
influence each other, form a complex series of behaviour patterns. 
It can be useful to experience the interactive energy between these facets in or-
der to approach an understanding of improvisation. This hypothesis is based on an 
assumption that improvised music is created by an interaction between large num-
bers of internalised concepts of musical sound, along with a corresponding array of 
precise physical movements. The sounds are expressed through the actions of the 
improviser. Ideally these actions will have their origins in more or less well-
defined aesthetic concepts. Thus the hypothesis of this research is that it is in the 
light of the improviser’s different perceptions of the words “imagination” and 
“form” that the musical train of events is set in motion. 
This study should be regarded as artistic research. The term “artistic” defines a 
research position that is related to an actual artistic practice. The work incorpo-
rates elements which can be described as creative research. This means that resear-
ches do not only form a subject for discussion, but have actually resulted in the 
creation of three different recording projects presented on four CDs. These musi-
cal manifestations are intended to serve both as demonstrations of working meth-
ods whilst also functioning as reference points. Since art both consists of deeds and 
thoughts the aim here is to probe the links between practical and theoretical aspects 
of improvisation. The recordings should thus be regarded as a medium to empha-
sise and give added weight to the arguments. 
The study is divided into two main sections. The first part focuses on the art of 
organ improvisation as practised during different periods of history, whilst the 
second part considers the aesthetical and practical aspects involved. The question 
as to how differing forms of an improvisatory “vocabulary” can be acquired, as-
similated and developed will occupy a prominent position in this latter section. 
 
 

VII 
 
 
 
 
 
Table of contents 
 
c
ontents of the cds: three recording projects
 
  1 
1. Historically inspired organ improvisations in Haga Church,  
Gothenburg 
      
 

2. Improvisations at the organs in Slagen and Eik churches,  
Tønsberg  
 
 
 
 
 
  3 
3. Ensemble-improvisation in Vasa Church, Gothenburg 
  4 
 
acknowledgements 
 
 
 
 
  6 
 
preliminaries
 
 
 
 
 
 
  9 
Chapter 1 – Introduction 
    10 
Previous researches into organ improvisation 
 
12 
Karin Johansson – pedagogic approaches to organ  
improvisation 
     14 
Ernst Ferand – pioneering researcher 
 
 
14 
Artistic research   
 
 
 
 
15 
 
Chapter 2 – Approaches to the term “improvisation” 
17 
Improvisation and composition – two classical archetypes  17 
Artefacts and idioms 
 
 
 
 
18 
Links with other art forms   
 
 
 
19 
Two 
definitions 
     20 
 
Chapter 3 – Theoretical perspectives     22 
A basic theoretical approach 
 
 
 
23 
Paul Ricoeur’s ideas of approaches to history 
 
25 
Methodological 
considerations 
   27 
 
part 1: the art of organ improvisation as  
perceived by different sources through  
the ages
   
 
 
 
 
 
35 
Chronology 
versus 
phenomenology 
   35 
 
Chapter 4 – Historical contexts 
   36 
The vertical and the horizontal dimension   
 
37 
 
Chapter 5 – Earliest sources    39 
Early textbooks for keyboard musicians 
 
 
41 
 

VIII
 
Chapter 6 – Three masters of the late Gothic and  
Renaissance 
 
 
 
 
 
44 
Conrad 
Paumann 
     44 
Paumann’s teaching materials 
 
 
 
46 
Johannes (Hans) Buchner  
 
 
 
53 
Tomas de Sancta Maria: Libro llamado arte de tãner  
fantasia  
 
    58 
 
Chapter 7 – General features of Baroque improvisation  
and its teaching in Germany 
   60 
Improvisation – a central element in organist-trials   
60 
 
Chapter 8 – A 19
th
 century view of improvisation and  
organ playing 
 
 
 
 
 
65 
Between the creative and interpretive aspects 
 
65 
Three major 19
th
 century improvisers: 
 
 
67 
 
Chapter 9 – French traditions of organ improvisation 69 
César Franck and Aristide Cavaillé-Coll 
 
 
69 
Liturgical organ playing in the mid-19
th
 century 
 
69 
Liturgical playing emphasises improvisation  
 
71 
Training conditions, auditions and the discipline of music  
competitions 
     72 
Features of a conservatoire tradition 
 
 
73 
 
Chapter 10 – César Franck – interpreter, improviser  
and teacher 
 
 
 
 
 
77 
César Franck as professor of organ playing at the Paris  
Conservatoire 
     80 
“Pater 
Seraphicus”     82 
 
Chapter 11 – Catholic traditions of liturgical organ  
improvisation in 19
th
 century Austria and Germany 94 
Roman Catholic practices outlined  
 
 
94 
A German church organ textbook details the duties of  
Catholic 
organists 
    96 
 
Chapter 12 – Anton Bruckner: composer and legendary  
organ improviser 
     104 
Bruckner as a church musician 
 
 
 
105 
Bruckner’s 
organ 
improvisation 
   106 
An improvisation outlined   
 
 
 
108 
Some 
common 
recollections 
   111 
The route to improvisation  
 
 
 
113 
 
 
 
 

IX 
Chapter 13 – Protestant traditions of organ playing and  
chorale improvisation 
    116 
Hymnological and liturgical background 
 
 
116 
Three musicologists and their contribution   
 
117 
Church music linked to practical theological studies  
119 
 
Chapter 14 – A leading organist, improviser and teacher 121 
Characteristics of Herzog’s liturgical organ playing   
123 
The 
Bach-succession 
    125 
The music scholar Johann Georg Herzog   
 
126 
Herzog’s own musical preferences  
 
 
127 
 
Chapter 15 – An important textbook in church organ  
playing 
      130 
Johann Georg Herzog’s Orgelschule 
 
 
130 
1. Principles for chorale-playing 
 
 
 
132 
2. Choral preludes and pieces of a free character   
137 
3. 
Liturgical 
accompaniment 
   145 
 
Chapter 16 – Recording project 1: 
A 19
th
 Century  
Christmas Service 
 
   148 
A creative understanding of music history   
 
148 
Historically inspired organ improvisations in Haga Church,  
Gothenburg 
     150 
 
Chapter 17 – A collection of examples for improvisation 153 
Musical craftsmanship – a common denominator for 19
th
  
century 
musicians 
    155 
 
Chapter 18 – 20
th
 century tradition bearers  
 
158 
Heinz 
Wunderlich 
     158 
Ruth 
Zechlin 
     161 
Rolande Falcinelli 
     164 
Olivier 
Latry 
     167 
European organ improvisation traditions illustrated by two  
20
th
 century textbooks   
 
 
 
170 
 
part 2: the art of improvisation as a stylistic,  
aesthetic and procedural phenomenon
  
173 
 
Chapter 19 – Style and aesthetic 
   174 
Improvisation – craftsmanship, art or kitsch? 
 
174 
Two 
main 
directions 
    175 
Two 
newspaper 
reviews 
    178 
20
th
 century culture – a powerful catalyst   
 
179 
Improvisation – the aesthetic of the moment 
 
182 
The expression “style” as a subject to be studied 
 
187 
A plan for the study of organ improvisation   
 
190 

X
 
Chapter 20 – Understanding the processes   193 
Early 19
th
 century and early 21st century thoughts on  
improvisation 
     194 
A process based on dilemmas 
 
 
 
196 
1. Musical improvisation as an activity based on rules  
 
and 
systems 
     198 
A distinction between composition and improvisation 
200 
Cognitive and motor models for explaining improvised  
actions 
      202 
Improvisation in the light of specialised skills 
 
207 
Basis of knowledge 
 
 
 
 
209 
About 
referents 
     209 
Conscious systemisation of the elements of knowledge 
211 
2. Improvisation as an interplay between intuitive and  
logical-analytical 
factors 
    213 
Keith Swanwick – about the formation of musical    
expressions 
     215 
3. Creative actions in the light of cross-modal experiences  216 
Cross-modal 
theory 
    219 
4. Skills which originate from imitation and study with  

master      225 
Procedural goals of knowledge 
 
 
 
227 
 
Chapter 21 – A model for learning 
   229 
Developing a “vocabulary” for improvisation linked to  
movements 
     229 
A model for learning of movements  
 
 
232 
A model for the control of movements 
 
 
233 
About chunking in improvisation 
 
 
 
234 
Historic instructions for learning improvisation’s  
“vocabulary” 
     235 
How is a technique for improvisation created? 
 
237 
 
Chapter 22 – Studying harmony and counterpoint  
in improvisation 
     241 
Harmonic 
awareness 
    241 
Learning 
contrapuntal 
techniques 
   242 
 
Chapter 23 –Two Recording projects     244 
Recording project 2: Contrasts on an historic ground 245 
Henri Bergson – a philosophical inspiration for the  
recording 
     245 
Kaleidoscopic 
organ 
sounds 
   246 
Improvisations at the organs in Slagen and Eik churches,  
Tønsberg 
     248 
“Det var en gang en dronning...” 
   249 
(“Once there was a queen…”) 
   249 
Commentary on the Recording 
 
 
 
250 

XI 
Recording project 3: A Concert Mass – Missa sacra  
et profana 
     253 
Dietrich Bonhoeffer – a theological inspiration for a  
recording 
project     253 
The fragmentary and paradoxical as an esthetical idea 
255 
Ensemble-improvisation in Vasa Church, Gothenburg 
258 
The Roman Catholic Mass for Easter day   
 
259 
 
postlude
 
      263 
Sketches for a conclusion – a possible approach to further  
creative improvisation research   
 
 
263 
 
Chapter 24 – Summary reflections   
 
 
264 
Aspects of Teaching 
 
 
 
 
266 
Aspects for further investigation 
 
 
 
267 
 
appendices
 
      269 
The function of the organ in 19
th
 century  
Evangelical Lutheran services 
   270 
 
A description of Louis Vierne’s improvisations  
and teaching 
     272 
 
Improvisation taught by Louis Vierne – his  
approach to harmonisation and development  
of a thème libre     273 
 
Adalbert Lindner describes Reger’s art of  
improvisation in his youth in Weiden  
 
280 
 
Reger’s improvisation at concerts in Kolberg   281 
 
Reger on the subject of fugal improvisation  
 
283 
 
Some facts about the Performers on the  
Recording 
projects 
    284 
 
Organs used for the Recording projects  
 
287 
 
literary sources
 
     291 
 
music sources
 
     301 
 
index of names
 
     305 
 
 
 
 

XII
 
 


 
 
 
 
C
ONTENTS OF THE 
CD
S
 
Three Recording projects 
1. Historically inspired organ improvisations in 
Haga Church, Gothenburg
 
A 19
th 
Century Christmas Service
 
Bell ringing (from St. Mary’s Church in Lübeck) (track 1) 
Prelude over the chorale melody Lobt Gott ihr Christen alle gleich: Concerto brevis 
in “Style Antiquo” (track 2) 
Opening hymnLobt Gott ihr Christen alle gleich
1
 (Text: Nikolaus Hermann. Me-
lody: Nikolaus Hermann 1560) Verse 1 (track 3) – Interlude (track 4) – Verse 2 
(track 5) – Interlude (track 6) – Verse 3 (track 7) – Interlude (track 8) – Verse 4 
(track 9) – Interlude (track 10) – Verse 5 (track 11) – Interlude (track 12) – Verse 
6 (track 13) – Interlude (track 14) – Verse 7 (track 15) – Interlude (track 16) – 
Verse 8 (track 17) – Epilogue and modulation to Introit (track 18)
 
IntroitUns ist ein Kind geboren
2
 (track 19)
 
The German Gloria PatriEhr sei dem Vater (track 20)
 
Confession (track 21) 
The German KyrieKyrie eleison, Herr erbarme Dich
 
(track 22) 
Absolution (track 23) 
The German Gloria in excelsisEhre sei Gott in der Höhe (track 24) 
Collect_with_salutation'>Collect with salutation (track 25) 
Bible reading (track 26) 
The Apostolic Creed (track 27) 
Gradual HymnGelobet seyst du, Jesu Christ
3
 (Text: Martin Luther. Melody: Old 
German 1524) Chorale prelude (track 28) – Verse 1 (track 29) – Interlude (track 
 
1
   Hymn tune in Gesangbuch für die evangelisch-lutherische Kirche in Bayern. Kraft des der 
allgemeinen Pfarrwittwen=Kasse zustehenden Verlagsrecht dermalen im Verlag bei U. E. Se-
bald, Buchdruckereibesitzer in Nürnberg 1855, no. 61. 
2
   This recorded Christmas Service reflects the traditions and practices of the 1860’s and 
1870’s Evangelican Lutheran liturgical playing in Germany (Bavaria). The greater part of the 
organ music (chorale preludes and harmonisations, intermissions, epilogues and the conclud-
ing postlude) was often improvised by professional church musicians. The regular liturgical i-
tems (such as Introit, Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, etc) were played according to the settings in Mu-
sikalische Anhang zu dem Agenden-Kern und zu der ihm vorangestellten Gottesdienstordnung 
für die evangelisch-lutherische Kirche in Bayern. Zum Gebrauch für Organisten und Cantoren, 
Nürnberg 1856. This accords to the descriptions below of an organ-master’s duties and habil-
ities. 
3
   Hymn tune in Gesangbuch für die evangelish-lutherische Kirche in Bayern, 1855, no. 57. 

three recording projects
 
2
 
30) – Verse 2 (track 31) – Interlude (track 32) – Verse 3 (track 33) – Interlude 
(track 34) – Verse 4 (track 35) – Interlude (track 36) – Verse 5 (track 37) – Inter-
lude (track 38) – Verse 6 (track 39) – Interlude (track 40) – Verse 7 (track 41). 
Bible reading (The sermon) (track 42) 
HymnWunderbarer Gnadenthron
4
 (Text: Joh. Olearius (1611-1684). Old 
Church Melody: 1544) Chorale prelude (track 43) – Verse 1 (track 44) – Interlude 
(track 45) – Verse 2 (track 46) – Interlude (track 47) – Verse 3 (track 48). 
PrayerDas allgemeine Kirchengebet (track 49) 
Lord’s PrayerVater unser (track 50) 
Hymn verse before CommunionSchaffe in mir Gott
5
 Prelude (track 51) – Verse 
(track 52) – Epilogue and modulation to Preface (track 53)
 
Preface and the German Sanctus: Heilig, Heilig, Heilig (track 54)
 
Eucharistic Prayer (track 55)
 
Lord’s Prayer: Vater unser (sung by the celebrant) (track 56) 
The German Agnus Dei: Christe, du Lamm Gottes (track 57) 
Words of institution (sung by the celebrant) (track 58)
 
Distribution (sharing of the sacred elements) (track 59)
 
Communion hymnVom Himmel hoch
6
 (Text: Martin Luther. Melody: 1540) 
Chorale prelude (track 60) – Verse 1 (track 61) – Interlude (track 62) – Verse 2 
(track 63) – Interlude (track 64) – Verse 3 (track 65) – Interlude (track 66) – 
Verse 4 (track 67) – Interlude (track 68) – Verse 5 (track 69) – Interlude (track 
70) – Verse 6 (track 71) – Interlude (track 72) – Verse 7 (track 73) – Interlude 
(track 74) – Verse 8 (track 75) – Interlude (track 76) – Verse 9 (track 77) – Inter-
lude (track 78) – Verse 10 (track 79) – Interlude (track 80) – Verse 11 (track 81) – 
Interlude (track 82) – Verse 12 (track 83) – Interlude (track 84) – Verse 13 (track 
85) – Interlude (track 86) – Verse 14 (track 87) – Interlude (track 88) – Verse 15 
(track 89).
 
Collect (track 90)
 
Blessing-Dismissal (track 91) 
Postlude: Choral-Fugue over Vom Himmel Hoch (track 92)
 
Bell ringing (from St. Mary’s Church in Lübeck) (track 93) 
Participants 
Choir (Congregation): Guldhedskyrkans Kammarkör, Gothenburg 
Conductor: Ulrike Heider 
Celebrant (liturgical song): Jan H. Börjesson 
Celebrant (liturgical reading): Jobst Ruediger Puchert 
Organ and artistic concept: Svein Erik Tandberg
 
 
4
 
 Ibid., no. 67. 
5
   Ibid., no. 188. Harmonised in Musikalische Anhang zum Agenden-Kern, 1856. 
6
   Hymn tune in Gesangbuch für die evangelisch-lutherische Kirche in Bayern, 1855, no. 58. 

 
                                              three recording projects  

Appendix 
From  Lochamer Liederbuch (1452) – Conrad Paumann (1410-1473): Benedicte 
almechtiger got (track 94)
 
 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə