Infestation (Photo: Sheldon Navie) habit



Yüklə 35.6 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix04.07.2017
ölçüsü35.6 Kb.

infestation (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

habit (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

the large and deeply-lobed lower leaves (Photo: Sheldon

Navie)


close-up of lower leaf with several deep lobes that have

bluntly toothed margins (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

close-up of stem, with scattered stiff hairs, and smaller

upper leaf (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet

Weeds of Australia - Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet



Raphanus raphanistrum

Scientific Name

Scientific Name

Raphanus raphanistrum L.

Synonyms

Synonyms


Raphanus raphanistrum L. subsp. raphanistrum

Family


Family

Brassicaceae (Queensland, New South Wales, the ACT, Victoria, Tasmania, Western

Australia and the Northern Territory).

Cruciferae (South Australia)

Common Names

Common Names

cadlock, charlock, jointed charlock, jointed radish, pointed charlock, radish, radish weed,

runch, white charlock, wild charlock, wild kale, wild radish, wild rape, wild turnip

Origin

Origin


Native to Europe, the Azores, the Madeira Islands, the Canary Islands, northern Africa

(i.e. Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia) and western Asia.

Naturalised Distribution

Naturalised Distribution

A very widely naturalised species that is most common in the southern and eastern

parts of the country. It is very common in south-eastern Queensland, the costal and sub-

coastal districts of New South Wales, the ACT, Victoria, Tasmania, south-eastern South

Australia and south-western Western Australia. It also has a scattered distribution in

other parts of Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia

and is possibly also naturalised in the Northern Territory.

Habitat

Habitat


A weed of disturbed sites, waste areas, roadsides, crops, pastures, waterways,

floodplains and open woodlands in temperate, sub-tropical, semi-arid and sometimes

also tropical regions.

Habit


Habit

An upright (i.e. erect or ascending) and short-lived (i.e. annual or biennial) herbaceous

plant usually growing 40-100 cm tall, but occasionally reaching up to 1.5 m in height. It

forms a basal rosette of leaves during the early stages of growth.

Distinguishing Features

Distinguishing Features

an upright herbaceous plant usually growing 40-100 cm tall.

it forms a basal rosette of large, deeply lobed leaves during the early stages

of growth.

its smaller and narrower upper leaves are alternately arranged and less

lobed than the lower leaves.

its white, pale yellow, lilac, pink or purplish flowers (18-40 mm across) have

four petals are borne in loose elongated clusters at the tips of the branches.

its elongated fruit (3-9 cm long and 3-6 mm wide) are borne on stalks 1-3 cm

long and end in a tapering 'beak' (1-3 cm long).

these fruit break up into several one-seeded segments when mature.

Seedling

Seedling


The two seed leaves (i.e. cotyledons) are heart-shaped (i.e. cordate) with deeply

indented tips (i.e. emarginate apices). They are hairless (i.e. glabrous) and borne on

relatively long stalks (i.e. petioles). The first true leaves are bluntly toothed (i.e. crenate)


whitish flowers with conspicuous darker veins (Photo:

Sheldon Navie)

close-up of pale yellow flowers (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

immature fruit (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

mature fruit (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

close-up of seeds (Photo: Steve Hurst at USDA PLANTS

Database)

seedlings with heart-shaped cotyledons (Photo: Sheldon

or somewhat lobed with rounded tips (i.e. obtuse apices). They are roughly hairy (i.e.

pubescent) with prominent veins.

Stems and Leaves

Stems and Leaves

The stems are rounded or slightly angled and often bluish-green to purplish in colour.

They may be unbranched or produce a few long branches near the base of the plant.

The leaves are green or bluish-green in colour, covered with scattered stiff hairs (i.e.

they are hispid), and are slightly rough to the touch (i.e. scabrous). Lower leaves (15-30

cm long and 5-10 cm wide) are stalked (i.e. petiolate), deeply lobed (i.e. pinnatisect), and

have irregularly toothed (i.e. crenate or serrate) margins. Stem leaves are alternately

arranged and the uppermost leaves are smaller (up to 7.5 cm long), narrower, and less

lobed or toothed than the lower leaves.

Flowers and Fruit

Flowers and Fruit

The flowers (18-40 mm across) are borne on stalks (i.e. pedicels) and are arranged in

loose elongated clusters at the tips of the branches (i.e. in terminal racemes). They

have four petals (1-2 cm long) with conspicuous veins and may be white, pale yellow,

lilac, pink or purplish in colour. Flowering occurs mostly from winter through to early

summer.

The elongated fruit resembles a pod (i.e. siliqua) and is slightly to strongly constricted



between each of the seeds. These fruit (3-9 cm long and 3-6 mm wide) are borne

upright (i.e. semi-erect) or spreading on stalks 1-3 cm long and terminate in a tapering

'beak' (1-3 cm long). They are green or purplish when immature, but turn yellowish-

brown or greyish in colour as they mature. When fully mature, they readily break up into

3-10 barrel-shaped segments (3-7 mm long and 2-5 mm wide), each segment

containing a single seed. The seeds are egg-shaped (i.e. ovoid) or almost rounded in

shape (1.5-4 mm long), with a finely pitted surface, and are reddish or yellowish-brown

in colour.

Reproduction and Dispersal

Reproduction and Dispersal

Reproduction in this species is only by seed, which are spread shorter distances by

wind, water, animals and human activities. Dispersal via contaminated agricultural

produce is thought to be the most significant means of long range spread.

Environmental Impact

Environmental Impact

While this species is mostly a weed of agricultural areas and habitation, wild radish

(

Raphanus raphanistrum) is also troublesome in natural vegetation in some areas. It is



seen as an environmental weed in Victoria and Western Australia and during a recent

survey was listed as a priority environmental weed in two Natural Resource

Management regions.

In Victoria, wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) is listed as a major environmental

weed in Kinglake National Park. It is also present in other conservation areas in this

state (e.g. Organ Pipes National Park) and appears on environmental weed lists for

Knox City, Boroondara City and the Colac-Otway Shire.

Wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) was also recently ranked as a mild environmental

weed in the Environmental Weed Strategy for Western Australia. It occasionally grows

amongst disturbed natural vegetation in this state, including in mallee, salmon gum,

and York gum woodlands.

Though wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) has not often been seen as an

environmental weed in other parts of Australia, it certainly occupies natural habitats in

other states. It has been recorded in several conservation areas in South Australia (e.g.

Onkaparinga River National Park, Belair National Park, Deep Creek Conservation Park,

Kyeema Conservation Park, Horsnell Gully Conservation Park and Sturt Gorge

Recreation Park) and in Kinchega National Park in south-western New South Wales. It is

also a common weed of riparian vegetation around Brisbane in south-eastern

Queensland.

Other Impacts

Other Impacts

Wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) is a major weed of winter crops in southern and

eastern Australia, and is particularly troublesome in cereal and brassica crops. It is also

thought to be poisonous to livestock.

Legislation

Legislation

This species is declared under legislation in the following states and territories:

New South Wales: C la s s  4

C la s s  4  - a locally controlled weed. The growth and

spread of this species must be controlled according to the measures



Navie)

young plant (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

immature fruit with long 'beak' and mature one-seeded

segments (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

specified in a management plan published by the local control authority and

the plant may not be sold, propagated or knowingly distributed (in a minority

of local authority areas). See the New South Wales Department of Primary

Industries Noxious Weeds List at http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au for more detailed

information on which local areas are covered in these declarations.

Western Australia: Unassessed - this species is declared in other states or

territories and are prohibited until assessed via a weed risk assessment

(throughout the entire state).

Management

Management

For information on the management of this species see the following resources:

Moore and Wheeler (2002), 

Southern Weeds and their Control, pp. 42-47.

Similar Species

Similar Species

Wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) may be confused with numerous closely related

weedy plants (e.g. 

Diplotaxis spp., Brassica spp., Sinapis spp., Sisymbrium spp.,

Rapistrum rugosum, Hirschfeldia incana and Myagrum perfoliatum). However, the fruit

of these species are usually less then 3 mm wide and split open when mature, instead

of breaking up into one-seeded segments.

It can also be distinguished from two less common naturalised radishes (i.e. 

Raphanus


maritimus and Raphanus sativus) by the following differences:

wild radish (

Raphanus raphanistrum) fruit are relatively long (3-9 cm long)

and slender (3-5 mm wide). They are constricted between the seeds and

break up into one-seeded segments when mature.

sea radish (

Raphanus maritimus) fruit are relatively small (2-6 cm long) and thick (5-8 mm wide). They are constricted between the seeds

and break up into one-seeded segments when mature.

garden radish (

Raphanus sativus) fruit are relatively short (2-6 cm long) and thick (5-10 mm wide). They are not constricted between the

seeds and do not break up into one-seeded segments when mature.

Fact sheets are available from Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) service centres and our Customer Service Centre (telephone 13

25 23). Check our website at 

www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au

 to ensure you have the latest version of this fact sheet. The control methods referred to in this fact sheet

should be used in accordance with the restrictions (federal and state legislation, and local government laws) directly or indirectly related to each control method. These

restrictions may prevent the use of one or more of the methods referred to, depending on individual circumstances. While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of

this information, DEEDI does not invite reliance upon it, nor accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused by actions based on it.

Copyright © 2016. All rights reserved. Identic Pty Ltd. Special edition of Environmental Weeds of Australia for Biosecurity Queensland.

The mobile application of Environmental Weeds of Australia is available from the Google Play Store and Apple iTunes.

Android Edition

Apple iOS Edition




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə