Interesting information on trees at bateleur



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INTERESTING INFORMATION ON TREES AT BATELEUR

Peltophorum africanum: African (Weeping) Wattle. Huilboom. S.A. No. 215

A semi-deciduous to deciduous tree up to 15m tall. Yellow Flowers from September to April. Fruiting from December to May. Fruit, non-splitting, thinly woody pods, hanging in clusters.

HABITAT. Occurs in wooded grassland.

Value. The leaves & twigs are eaten by elephant, black rhino, giraffe, kudu, impala & grey duiker.

A good source of nectar and pollen. A decorative garden tree for shade, with a non- aggressive root system.

The tree is often attacked by spittle bugs in summer, which excretes almost pure water, which froths around the insect and drips to the ground, thus causing the rain to ‘rain’ / ‘weep’. Hence the common name.

The yellow flowers attract many insects, which in turn, attract many insect-eating birds.

The larvae of the butterflies Charaxes vansoni (Van Son’s), Charaxes ethalion (Satyr) and Charaxes brainei (Braine’s) feed on the leaves and in turn, attract insect- eating birds.

A fast grower, with a growth rate of between 1 – 1,5 m per annum. It is fairly drought resistant.


Ziziphus mucronata: Buffalo Thorn. Blinkblaar-wag-‘n-bietjie. S.A. No. 447

A deciduous tree up to 17m tall. Yellowish green clusters of flowers from October to April. Fruiting from February to August. Fruit a reddish/brown glossy drupe.



HABITAT. Occurs mostly in woodland and wooded grassland.

Value. A valuable fodder tree for game which relish the nutritious leaves and fruit. This tree has a non-aggressive root system and is a must for the bird garden, as it attracts guineafowl, francolins, purple crested and grey louries as well as Burchell’s coucal.

Larvae of the black pie Tuxentius melaena, common dotted blue Tarucus Sybaris Sybaris, Hintza pie



Zintha hintza and white pie Tuxentius calice calice butterflies feed on the leaves.

A fast growth rate of between 4 – 6m in four years. A hardy tree which is drought resistant.


Erythrina lysistemon: Common Coral Tree. Gewone Koraalboom. S.A. No.245

A deciduous tree up to 12m. Bright red erect heads of flowers from June to October. Fruiting from September to February. Black seed pods, splitting to release shiny orange to red seeds.



HABITAT. Covers a wide range of habitats, not restricted to any soil types. This tree has an aggressive root system and should not be planted near buildings, walls or pools.

Value. Many insect and nectar seeking birds, including sunbirds are attracted to the flowers. Leaves are browsed by elephant, klipspringer, black rhino, kudu and nyala. The larvae of the giant charaxes butterfly Charaxes castor flavifasciatus feed on the leaves. The brown – headed parrot feeds on the unripe seeds and nectar from the flowers. Grey louries feed on the flower buds and flowers. Barbets and woodpeckers usually nest in these trees, because the soft fibrous wood is easy to excavate.

The trees can easily be propagated from truncheons and have a fast growth rate of up to 1,5m per annum. They are very drought resistant.


Bolusanthus speciosus: Tree Wisteria. Vanwykshout. S.A. No. 222

A deciduous tree up to 18m with bunches of purple pea like flowers from September to October. The seed pods are narrow, non- splitting and grey brown in colour.



HABITAT. Grows in woodland and wooded grasslands and is an indicator of clay soils. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. It makes a good container plant, in full sun and is also a good accent tree. The flowers are eaten by monkeys and grey duiker eat the pods and dropped leaves.

The trees are very drought resistant and have a fast growth rate of up to 800mm per annum.


Sclerocarya birrea: Marula. Maroela. S.A. tree No. 360

A deciduous tree up to 18m with long sprays of yellow flowers, tinged with red, with male a female flowers on separate trees from August to December. The fruits are spherical and yellow in colour, when ripe from November to March.



HABITAT. Grows in various types of woodland on sand to sandy loam. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. The fruit is eaten by Kudu, impala, duiker and monkeys. They also attract many bird species as well as 8 different species of butterflies. The fruit has a high vitamin C content.

A very fast growing tree, with a growth rate of up to 1,5 m per annum. The Marula is a drought resistant tree which also makes a good shade tree. It can be propagated from truncheons.


Trichilia emetica: Natal Mahogany. Rooiessenhout. S.A. No. 301

An evergreen tree up to 20m. The flowers are borne is dense short branched heads which are creamy green in colour from August to November. The fruits are borne in a pear shaped capsule, which splits to release glossy black seeds, which are enveloped in an orange-red aril, from December to April.



HABITAT. Grows on alluvial or sandy soils. . It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. A good shade tree. The seeds attract starlings, louries, hornbills and barbets. The larvae of the whitebarred charaxes (Charaxes brutus natalensis) butterfly feed on the leaves of this tree.

A fast growing tree with a growth rate of up to 1m per annum. It can withstand long periods of drought and is a protected tree in South Africa.


Harpephyllum caffrum: Wild Plum. Wildepruim. S.A. No. 361

An evergreen tree up to 20m. The flowers are whitish in small branched sprays, with male and female flowers on different trees from November to December. The fruits are oblong, fleshy and red when mature from December to March.



HABITAT. Grows in evergreen forests and woodland and prefers being close to water. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. The fruit is eaten by monkeys, bushbabies, bushpigs and bushbuck, African green pigeons, cape parrots, louries, mousebirds, barbets, bulbuls and starlings. The larvae of the common hairtail (Anthene definita) butterfly feeds on the flower buds and flowers .

A fast growing good shade tree with a growth rate of 1 – 1,5m per annum. It is fairly drought resistant. It can be propagated from truncheons.


Ficus ingens var. ingens: Red Leaved Rock Fig. Rooiblaarrotsvy.S.A. No. 55

A semi-deciduous tree up to 25m with coppery-red leaves in Spring. The small male and two types of female flowers are found INSIDE the fruit. The figs are thus not true fruits, but receptacles called syconia. Each fig tree is pollinated by different species of wasps. Fruiting (flowering) from June to December.



HABITAT. It Grows in rocky outcrops, on hills, or in woodland. The tree has an aggressive root system and must not be planted near buildings or walls.

Value. The young leaves are eaten by grey duiker and nyala. The fruits attract Rameron and African green pigeons, Cape and brown headed parrots, purple crested and grey louries, bulbuls, starlings and barbets.

It has a fast growth rate of up to 1m per annum and can be propagated from truncheons. The tree makes an excellent container plant.


Ficus Sur: Broom Cluster Fig. Besemtrosvy. S.A. No. 50

An Evergreen tree up to 35m in height. The figs are borne in clusters on long branched stalks on the old wood of the tree. They are reddish, mottled with cream when ripe. Fruiting from September to March.



HABITAT. Grows in riverine bush, in wooded grassland and always near water. The root system is aggressive and not suitable for gardens or planting near to walls or foundations.

Value. The leaves are eaten by kudu, nyala and blue duiker. Fruits are eaten by African green pigeons, Cape parrots, brown headed parrots, Knysna, grey and purple crested louries. Fruit eating bats also relish the ripe fruits. The larvae of the Fig Tree butterfly, Myrina silenus ficedula and the African map butterfly Cyrestis pantheus sublineatus feed on the leaves.

The growth rate is fast, up to 1m per annum. And can be propagated from cuttings or truncheons.


Heteropyxis natalensis: Lavender Tree. Laventelboom. S.A. No. 455

A semi-diciduous to evergreen tree up to 15m in height. The flowers are small in branched and spreading heads, fragrant, white to pale yellowish cream from December to March. The fruits are small brownish purple from March to May. The leaves have a distinctive lavender smell when crushed.



HABITAT. Grows in open woodland or grasslands and on rocky hills. The tree has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. The leaves are eaten by Kudu and grey duiker. The small flowers attract many insects, which in turn attract many insect eating birds. The tree makes a good accent plant for the garden with its grey to light brown flaking bark.

The growth rate is fast, 800mm to 1m per annum.


Dichrostachys cineria: Sickle Bush. Sekelbos. S.A. No. 190.

A semi-deciduous to deciduous tree up to 7m in height. The flowers are borne in pendulous long two coloured spikes. The upper part pink with the lower part yellow from October to February. The fruit is a cluster of non-splitting, contorted pods from May to September.



HABITAT. Grows in a diverse range of habitats, including woodland, forest margins, scrub and grassland. It grows on all types of soil. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. The leaves, young twigs and fresh seed pods are eaten by nyala, impala, klipspringer, red duiker. The tree has been classified as a pioneer species, which can also become an encroacher. It attracts many insects, which in turn, attract many insect eating birds. The larvae of the satyr charaxas (Charaxas ethalion ethalion) butterfly feed on the leaves.

It can easily be grown from seed and is a medium to slow growing tree with a growth rate of 600 – 800mm per annum. It is very drought resistant.


Syzygium cordatum: Waterberry. Waterbessie. S.A. No. 555

The flowers are dense heads of creamy white, borne from August to November. The fruits are in clusters and are fleshy, pinkish to purplish borne from November to March.



HABITAT. Grows along streams, dams and rivers. This tree is an indicator of underground water. The root system is fairly aggressive.

Value. It is a good shade tree for game. The leaves are browsed by nyala, bushbuck and grey duiker. The ripe fruits are eaten by monkeys and bushbabies, tambourine doves, African green pigeons, purple crested and grey louries. The larvae of the flame-bordered charaxes (Charaxas protoclea) and the silver-barred charaxes (Charaxes druceanus) butterflies feed on the leaves.

The Waterberry has a fast growth rate of up to 1m per annum. The seed germinates readily and transplants well. It is a protected tree in South Africa.


Dombeya rotundifolia var. rotundifolia: Wild Pear. Drolpeer. S.A. No. 471

A deciduous tree up to 10m. The flowers are borne in early Spring from July to September and appear before the leaves. They are borne in clusters, at the tips of branches, and are white to light pink turning brown with age. The fruits are hairy, semi round and brown, borne from October to December.



HABITAT. Grows in woodland, wooded grassland and on rocky mountain slopes. It has a non- aggressive root system.

Value. The trees are browsed by kudu, nyala, sable and steenbok. The sweetly scented flowers , which produce copious amounts of nectar, attract bees and butterflies.

The growth rate is very fast, 1 -1,5m per annum and is very drought resistant. It makes an excellent garden specimen.


Acacia sieberiana var. woodii. Paperbark Thorn. Papierbasdoring. S.A. No. 224.

A deicduous to semi-deciduous tree up to 12 m with a spreading crown. The flowers are florets with white and yellow bases from September to November. The fruits are hard, thick and woody, from March to July.



HABITAT. The trees occur in bushveld and grassland areas. The root system is non-aggressive.

Value. The pods are eaten by a variety of game. The tree harbours a variety of insects, which attract insect eating birds. It is also prone to borer attack. A good shade tree.

The growth rate is fast, up to 1m per annum. It is easily propagated from fresh seed. The tree is drought resistant.



Senna petersiana (Cassia petersiana): Monkey Pod. Apiespeul. S.A. No. 213.

A deciduous small tree, up to 12m in height. The flowers are branched sprays of yellow borne from January to June. The fruits are long slender pods, often constricted between the seeds and are borne from May to August.



HABITAT. The trees occur in bushveld and sand forest, particularly on sandy soils. They have a non-aggressive root system.

Value. Fairly fast growing, up to 500mm per annum. The seed pods are relished by several species of birds. The African migrant (Catopsilia florella) butterfly breeds on this tree.
Antedesma venosum: Tassel Berry. Voelsitboom. S.A. No. 318

An evergreen to semi deciduous tree up to 15m in height. Male and female flowers are borne on different trees. Male flowers in spikes with blood red anthers and female flowers in long racaemes which are strongly scented from October to January. The fruits are black and fleshy borne from January to May.



HABITAT. Grows in various types of woodland and wooded grassland. Prefers well drained and sandy soils. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Value. The leaves and young shoots are eaten by kudu, nyala and bushbuck. The fruits are eaten by nyala, monkeys and impala, guinefowl, francolins, green spotted doves, tambourine doves, African green pigeons, louries, hornbills, barbets, bulbuls and mousebirds.

An excellent tree for attracting wildlife to a garden.

The growth rate is fast, 800- 900mm per annum and grows easily from seed.
Tremia orientalis: Pigeonwood. Hophout. S.A. No. 42.

A small to medium sized semi-deciduous tree up to 13m. The flowers are small, inconspicuous, yellowish green, borne from December to February. The fruits are small round and black borne from January to June. It has a mildly aggressive root system.



HABITAT. Grows in various habitats along forest margins, along water courses and in woodland areas. It is a pioneer species, widely planted for the reclamation of soils.

Value. The fruit is eaten by a variety of birds. The leaves are browsed by game. The larvae of Charaxas species butterflies feed on the leaves.

The growth rate is fast, up to 1m per annum. Seed germinates well and is easily transplanted.


Englerophytum magaliesmontanum: Transvaal Milkplum. Stamvrug.

S.A. No. 581

A low branching, multi-stemmed, evergreen small tree up to 10m.

The flowers are strong smelling, creamy white to pink and star shaped from June to December. The fruits are plum shaped and red when ripe from December to February.



HABITAT. Grows on rocky outcrops.

Value. The fruit is eaten by a variety of animals and birds. The larvae of the Pseudacraea boisduvalii trimeni butterfly.

The growth rate is fairly slow and drought resistant. The tree can be propagated from fresh seed and cuttings.



Acacia ataxacantha: Flame Thorn. Rank-wag-‘n-bietjie. S.A. No.160

A very thorny, multi stemmed deciduous tree up to 12m. The flowers are spikes of creamy yellow in colour from September to February.

The seed pods are a deep red colour when ripe from December to June.

Value. The larvae of the Charaxes ethalion ethalion butterfly, feed on the leaves. The Red Billed Woodhoepoe and Bar Throated Apalis eat insects which live on the bark and leaves.

The tree has a fast growth rate of up to 1m per annum.


Tabernaemontana elegans: Toad Tree, Paddaboom. S.A. No. 644

Deciduous tree which grows up to 3 – 4 meters. The flowers are white to cream, sweetly scented and are borne from October to February. The fruits are paired, green when young and brown when ripe, splitting to expose a bright orange pulp which contains the seeds, during April to September. It has a non-aggressive root system.



HABITAT. Grows in varied soil types on rocky outcrops and along streams, in low altitude areas.

VALUE: The seeds are relished by various birds, monkeys and baboons.

The tree is relatively fast growing with a growth rate of up to 1m per annum.


Annona senegalensis: Wild Custard –Apple, Wildesuikerappel. S.A. No 105

A deciduous shrub or small tree up to 4m. The flowers are cream to yellow and are borne from October to December. The fruits are fleshy, lumpy and egg-shaped, yellow to orange when ripe, from December to March.



HABITAT. Grows along rivers and streams, in mixed scrub and woodland and on rocky outcrops, favouring sandy soils.

VALUE: The fruit is edible and has a very pleasant flavour and are eaten by monkeys and baboons.

The tree has a relatively fast growth rate and is drought resistant.


Celtis Africana: White Stinkwood, Witstkinhout. S.A. No. 39

A deciduous tree up to 12m in height. The sexes of the flowers are separate, but borne on the same tree, small inconspicuous and greenish in colour, borne from August to October. The fruits are small berry like yellow brown to black when ripe from October to February.



HABITAT: Grows is forests and along streams, in woodland and grassland and has a non-aggressive root system.

VALUE: The leaves are browsed by kudu, bushbuck, nyala, impala and grey duiker. The ripe fruits are eaten by bulbuls, mousebirds, barbets, parrots, louries, doves and pigeons. The Larvae of the African snout (Libythea labdaca) and the blue-spotted charaxas (Charaxas cithaeron) feed on the leaves.

The tree is fast growing, up to 2m per annum and can be cultivated easily from fresh seed. It is a protected tree in S.A.



Bridelia micrantha: Mitzeerie. Mitserie. S.A. No. 324

HABITAT: Grows in swamp forest, along forest edges and streams and in open woodland. The flowers are very small and yellowish, flowing from October to December. The fruits are oval and black when mature, from January to March. It has an aggressive root system and should not be planted near buildings or paved areas.

VALUE: The leaves are eaten by Nyala, bushbuck and grey duiker. The fruits are relished by Green Pigeons, Purple Crested & Grey Louries, Pied Glossy Starlings, Crested Barbets, Mouse Birds and Bulbulls. Larvae of the Giant charaxas (Charaxes castor flavifasciatus) and Morant’s orange (parasmodes morantii) live on this tree.

The tree has a fast growth rate of up to 2m per annum and can be cultivated easily from seed. It is a protected tree in South Africa.


Euclea divinorum: Magic Guarri. Towerghwarrie. S.A. No. 242

HABITAT: An evergreen shrub or small tree up to 8m in height that occurs in bushveld, along river banks and grasslands. The flowers are very small, white to creamy yellow, flowering from July to January. The fruits are spherical, purplish black when mature from October to December). It has a non- aggressive root system.

VALUE: Browsed by game. The flowers attract bees.

They are fast growing and hardy and can be cultivated easily from fresh seed.


Gymnosporia buxifolia: Common Spike-thorn. Gewone pendoring. S.A. No. 399. (Maytenus heterophylla).

A shrub or small tree up to 5m in height. Mostly evergreen and usually with somewhat drooping branches with slender spines. The flowers are whitish and are borne from February to June. The fruits are more or less spherical greenish yellow and from yellow to redish when ripe from May to January.



HABITAT: Occurs in a wide range of habitats. There are at least 4 sub-species of this shrub.

It has a non-aggressive root system and is often a pioneer species in disturbed places.


Rhus rehmanniana: Blunt-leaved taaibos. Stompblaartaaibos. S.A.No. 393.1

A small tree up to 5m in height. Flowers are small, greenish yellow from December to April. The fruits are spherical and yellowish when ripe from April to June.



HABITAT: Occurs in thicket, grasslands and mountainsides. It has a non-aggressive root system.

Psychotria capensis: Black Bird Berry. Swartvoelbessie. S.A. No. 723

A small tree or shrub up to 7m in height. Flowers are in terminal heads, are rich cream to yellow from September to January. The fruits are red when mature from April to August,



HABITAT: Occurs on rocky outcrops in high rainfall grassland and in forests.
Clerondendrum myricoides: Blue Cat’s Whiskers. Kleinharpuisblaar. S.A. No. 667.1

A deciduous shrub or small tree, 3 – 7 meters in height. Flowers are in terminal clusters, bright blue to purple from October to January. The fruits are reddish to black, when mature, from December to February.



HABITAT: Occurs in Bushveld and coastal bush and is often found on rocky outcrops.
Rhus pentheri: Common Crow-berry. Gewonekraaibessie. S.A. No. 391.

A much branched shrub or small tree up to 6m in height. The flowers are small, yellow and star shaped from August to March. The fruit are grape like, shiny yellow to light brown, from September to April.



HABITAT: Occurs in dry types of woodland, thornveld and scrub.
Rhus pyroides: Common taaibos. Gewone taaibos S.A. No. 392.

A small bushy shrub or small tree,up to 5 meters in height. The Flowers are small, yellow and borne in terminal heads from October to February. The fruits are small, grape like, yellow to reddish brown from October to May.



HABITAT: Occurs in open woodland and dry thronveld.


Mimusops zeyheri: Transvaal red-milkwood. Moepel. S.A. No. 585.

An evergreen, medium to large tree up to 15 meters in height. The flowers are strong scented, white to creamy star shaped flowers, borne from October to March. The fruits are plum like, yellow-orange when ripe from April to October.



HABITAT: Occurs on rocky outcrops and in grasslands. It is a fairly fast grower and does not have an aggressive root system. Makes an attractive container/bonsai specimen.

VALUE: The fruits are eaten by kudu, nyala, duiker and bushpig, Green and Rameron pigeons. The larvae of the Pied False Acraea butterfly, Pseudacraea lucretia tarquini .
Apodytes dimidiata: White Pear. Witpeer. S.A. No. 422.

An evergreen tree, usually 4 to 5 meters, but can reach up to 25 meters in forests. The flowers are in loose heads, white and sweetly scented, from September to April. The fruits are berry like and black when ripe from December to June.



HABITAT: Occurs in open woodland, on grassy mountain slopes, often among rocks. It makes an attractive garden specimen and has a non-aggressive root system. It is a protected tree in S.A.

VALUE: The fruits are eaten by Rameron pigeons, Redwinged starlings, Pied barbets and Bulbuls and Guineafowl.

Ficus thonningii: Common Wild Fig. Moerasvy. S.A. No. 48.

An evergreen tree up to 15 meters in height. The flowers are enclosed in the fig, which is reddish when ripe and only found on the new growth of the tree. Flowering and fruiting during most time of the year, reaching a peak in Ocober.



HABITAT: Occurs in wooded grassland, on rocks and on the edges of forests. It has an aggressive root system and should not be planted near buildings, pools or walls.

VALUE: The leaves and twigs are eaten by kudu, nyala, bushbuck and impala. The fruits are eaten by fruit-eating bats, louries, parrots, pigeons, starlings, barbets and bulbuls.

Larvae of the lesser fig tree blue, Myrina dermaptera and the common fig tree blue Myrina silenus ficedula butterflies, feed on the leaves.


Ekebergia capensis: Cape Ash. Essenhout. S.A. No. 298.

An evergreen tree up to 20 meters in height. The sweetly scented flowers are in loose sprays at the tips of the branches, found on separate male and female trees, white in colour from September to December. The fruits are fleshy and red when mature from November to April.



HABITAT: Occurs mostly in woodland, coastal sandveld or montane forests. It has a non-aggressive root system.

VALUE: Kudu, nyala and bushbuck browse the leaves. The fruits are eaten by Purple crested louries, barbets, hornbills, bulbuls and mousebirds. Larvae of the white-barred charaxes Charaxes brutus natalensis feed on the leaves.
Tarchonanthus trilobus: Broad-leaved camphor bush. Wildekanferbos. S.A. No. 734.

An evergreen tree up to 9 meters in Height. The flowers are cream coloured in sprays from March to June. The fruits are nutlets covered in long white woolly hairs from June to September.



HABITAT: Occurs in woodland and in wooded grasslands. It has a rather aggressive root system. These trees can be planted in eroded areas to assist with prevention of soil erosion.

VALUE: The leaves are browsed by nyala, impala and grey duiker.
Annona senegalensis: Wild custard-apple. Wildesuikerappel. S.A. No. 105.

A shrub or small deciduous tree, up to 4 meters in height. The flowers are cream to yellow, often tinged with red or maroon, from October to December. The fruits are fleshy, egg shaped, yellow to orange when ripe, from December to March.



HABITAT: Occurs along rivers, rocky outcrops and in swampy areas.

VALUE: The leaves are browsed by game. The fruits are eaten by a variety of birds. The larvae of the swordtail butterflies Graphium spp. Feed on the leaves.

PLANTS FOUND ON BATELEUR ESTATE:


Cyrtanthus contractus: Fire Lily

Bright red tube like flowers appear in spring(August to September) in open areas or in areas which were burnt. It is a relatively rare plant in medium to high altitude grasslands. This is a protected plant in S.A.


Xerophyta retinervis: Bobbejaanstert, Aapstert.

White, pink or mauve flower in early spring, after the first rains, from the apparently dead dark brown to black fibrous stems. The stems consist mainly of fire-proof layers of old leaf bases, which enable the plant to survive the annual ravages of fire. Normally found on exposed granite outcrops at low to medium altitudes.


Typhaceae capensis: Bulrush, Papkuil, Palmiet.

A vlei plant with conspicuous brown inflorescences in mid summer, which grows to about 1-5m high with narrow leaves. The inflorescence consists of densely packed Males flowers in the upper zone and female flowers below. Growing in dams, streams and vlei’s. Provides nesting places for a variety of birds, such as weavers, southern red bishops and widow birds.


Nymphae caerulea: Water Lily, Blue Lotus, Waterlelie

Aquatic plant, with floating ,almost circular leaves. The flowers range from a very pale mauve to almost white and blue and bloom from Summer to Autumn.



LLippia javanica. Fever Tea. Braam van Wyk & SassaMalan book pg. 182.
Rhoicissis tridentate. Bushman’s Grape. Pg. 392 . a Filed Guide to trees of Southern Africa by Braam and Piet van Wyk.


Scilla natalensis. Blue Squill. Jo Onderstall.
Eucomis Autumnalis. Pineapple plant. Jo Onderstall.


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