International Food Research Journal 20(2): 551-556 (2013)



Yüklə 91.19 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü91.19 Kb.

© All Rights Reserved

*Corresponding author. 

Email: rabeta75@yahoo.com

      International Food Research Journal 20(2): 551-556 (2013)

Journal homepage: http://www.ifrj.upm.edu.my

1*

Rabeta, M. S., 



1

Chan,  S., 

1

Neda, G. D., 



2

Lam, K. L. and 

2

Ong, M. T.



1

Food Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology

2

Institute for Research in 

Molecular Medicine, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang

Anticancer effect of underutilized fruits 

Abstract

Plants,  particularly  fruits  and  vegetables,  have  many  phytochemicals  that  possess  various 

bioactivities,  including  antioxidant  and  anticancer  properties.  In  this  study,  the  aim  was  to 

investigate the antiproliferative properties of Syzygium fruits, namely water apple (Syzygium 



aqueum),  milk  apple  (Syzygium  malaccense),  and  malay  apple  (Syzygium  malaccense  L.) 

against two types of cancer-origin cells, namely MCF-7 (hormone dependent breast cancer 

cell  line)  and  MDA-MB-231  (nonhormone-dependent  breast  cancer  cell  line). Two  solvent 

methods  were  prepared  using  aqueous  and  methanol  extraction. Antiproliferation  activities 

of these extracts were evaluated by employing colorimetric MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-

yl)2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay through time periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours. The 

result showed that extracts from the three fruits had no significant effects  for 24 and 48 hours 

time periods (p >0.05) but extracts  of Water apple and Malay apple displayed  antiproliferation 

effects on MCF-7 cell lines (p <0.05) in 72 hours, also there were no effects on the non-cancer 

origin cell line. The methanolic extracts of the malay apple was more significant with 79% cell 

viability in the case of MCF7 (IC

50

 =632.3 µg/ml). However, extracts of the milk apple did 



show antiproliferation effects on both cancer origin and non cancer-origin cell lines (p <0.05) 

in 72 hours. This finding revealed that fruits extract exhibit antiproliferative activity against 

MCF-7, which is strongly estrogen-dependant, probably due to extract compound responsible 

for its anticancer properties. Many studies had shown that plant polyphenols may prevent the 

metastasis of breast cancer cells through common pathway.

Introduction

Recent  studies  focusing  on  the  exploitation 

of  natural  compounds  from  fruits  for  medicinal 

purposes has drawn much attention to the effective 

extraction  of  the  desired  bioactive  ingredients 

from  natural  products.  Plants,  particularly  fruits 

and  vegetables,  have  many  phytochemicals  that 

possess  various  bioactivities,  including  antioxidant 

and  anticancer properties. Fruits  can  add  important 

vitamins, minerals, and other bioactive compounds to 

the human diet (Vasco et al., 2008). Some promising, 

but very under-utilized fruits belonging to Syzygium 

genus  of  the  Myrtaceae  family  found  in  Malaysia 

have been recognized as having the potential to be 

more useful for nutritional and medical purposes. 

Syzygium is a genus in the Myrtaceae family that 

includes a number of popular species cultivated for 

their  colorful,  edible  fleshy  fruit.  The  genus  name 

Syzygium is derived via Latin from the Greek word 

‘syzygos’, meaning yoked together, possibly referring 

to the paired leaves (Janick and Paull, 2008). Their 

fleshy fruit are eaten as such or added to fruit salads, 

or are cooked or preserved in various ways for home 

use (Wong and Lai, 1996). The three fruits focused 

on  water  apple,  Syzygium  aqueum,  which  is  also 

called jambu air by the local community, milk apple, 



Syzygium malaccense also known as jambu susu or 

jambu  tetek  and  lastly,  the  malay  apple,  Syzygium 

malaccense  L.  which  is  commonly  referred  to  as 

jambu bol or jambu agung. According to the study by 

Khoo et al. (2008), milk apple contains a low level 

of total carotene content of (about 3.35 mg/100 g), 

however beta-carotene was not found in milk apple. 

In addition, Syzygium species possess antibacterial 

activity (Chattopadhyay and Sinha, 2000). Also, the 

bark of the malay apple tree has a variety of interesting 

biological  activities.  It  inhibited  four  species  of 



Keywords

Antiproliferation

MCF-7

MDA-MB-231

MTT assay

water apple

milk apple

malay apple

breast cancer

Article history

Received: 29 August 2012

Received in revised form: 

27 October 2012

Accepted: 29 October 2012

552

Rabeta et al./IFRJ 20(2): 551-556

viruses,  three  species  of  fungus  and  provides 

experimental  verification  for  its  use  in  traditional 

medicine  (Locher  et  al.,  1995).    Syzygium  species 

has the potential to be more useful for nutritional and 

medical purposes.

Breast cancer is one of the major causes for the 

increasing  mortality  among  women.  In  Malaysia, 

there has been an increased admission rate of patients 

diagnosed with breast cancer in government hospitals 

(Abdullah and Yip, 2003). Breast cancer is the most 

common cancer among females in all ethnic groups 

and all age groups in females from the age of 15. It 

is also the most important cancer regardless of sex in 

Peninsular Malaysia (Zainal et al., 2006). 

According to the study done by Norsa’adah et al

(2005), the main factors associated with high risk of 

breast cancer in women are nulliparity (the condition 

of not bearing offspring), overweight/obesity, family 

history  of  breast  cancer,  and  oral  contraceptives 

(birth  control  pills)  usage.  Abdominal  obesity  has 

been shown to be correlated with breast cancer risk 

in the Klang Valley, Malaysia (Rabeta et al., 2007) 

and estrogen hormone modifying breast cancer risk 

(Oldenburg et al., 2007). 

Many  evidences  from  researches  have 

demonstrated  that  many  natural  products  isolated 

from plant sources possess antitumor properties (Wu 



et al., 2002). A few studies have already examined 

the antioxidant properties of these fruits. The main 

objective  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  the  anti 

proliferative  properties  of  selected  underutilized 

fruits  namely  water  apple,  milk  apple,  and  malay 

apple  against  cancer-origin  MCF-7  (hormone 

dependent  breast  cancer  cell  line),  MDA-MB-231 

(nonhormone-dependent breast cancer cell line) and 

noncancer  origin  HS27  (human  foreskin  fibroblast 

cell line). 



Materials and Method

Water apple, milk apple, and malay apple were 

harvested  in  October  2010.  HS27  (ATCC®  CRL-

1634™, human foreskin fibroblast cell line), MCF-7 

(ATCC®  HTB-22™,  hormone-dependent  breast 

cancer cell line) and MDA-MB-231 (ATCC® HTB-

26™, non hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line) 

were  purchased  from  the  American  Type  Culture 

Collection (ATCC), USA. Phosphate Buffer Solution 

(PBS)  tablets  were  obtained  from  AMRESCO 

INC,  Cleveland,  Ohio,  USA.  The  media  used  was 

Dulbecco’s  Modified  Eagle  Medium  (DMEM  with 

low  glucose,  and  high  glucose)  and  Foetal  Bovine 

Serum  (FBS),  penicillin–streptomycin  and  trypsin 

were  from  Gibco®,  InvitrogenTM,  USA.  MTT 

labelling  reagent  was  obtained  from  Molecular 

Probes®, InvitrogenTM, Oregon, USA.

Sample preparation 

The  fruits  were  harvested  from  Kuala  Kurau, 

Perak,  Malaysia.  The  fruits  were  identified  by  the 

Herbarium  Unit  of  the  Forest  Research  Institute 

Malaysia  (FRIM)  in  Kepong,  Selangor.  Fruits  of 

water  apple,  milk  apple  and  malay  apple  were 

cut  into  small  pieces  and  dried  by  using  a  freeze 

drier  (ALPHA  Freeze  Drier  Model  1-2  LD  plus, 

Vacuubrand, Germany) for four days. Ground fruits 

were kept in -20°C prior to extraction. This was done 

at the School of Industrial Technology, USM Penang, 

Malaysia.



Hot aqueous extraction 

Based on the method proposed by Huang et al

(2003),  ground  fruits  were  extracted  with  boiling 

distilled water in the proportion of 1:20 (w/v) for 4 

hours. The resulting crude extracts were filtered with 

Whatman filter. The filtrate was lyophilized down to 

dry powder by using freeze drier. The dried extracts 

were kept in -20°C.



Methanol extraction

Methanol extraction of the plant was performed 

according to the method described by Wicaksono et 

al. (2009). Firstly, we had use 100 g of ground fruits. 

The  sample  were  weighed  and  then  soaked  in  300 

mL  absolute  methanol  for  24  hours.  Subsequently 

the  crude  extract  was  filtered  with  Whatman 

filter.  Residual  solvent  of  methanolic  extract  was 

removed  under  reduced  pressure  at  40

o

C  using 



a  rotary  evaporator  (EYELA  Rotary  Evaporator 

Model  N-1000,  Tokyo  Rikakika  Co.,  Ltd,  Japan). 

Evaporation was continued by storing the methanolic 

extract at room temperature for 2 days. The extract 

was diluted in PBS before assays. Final dilution was 

made in DMEM containing 20% FBS.



Cell subculture

This was carried out at the Institute for Research 

in  Molecular  Medicine  (INFORMM),  USM  based 

on  method  from  Freshney  (1994).  The  cells  were 

observed  under  inverted  phase-contrast  microscope 

and split using trypsin-EDTA after incubation at 37

o



in 5% CO



incubator for 5 mins. Cell suspension of 

10

3

 cells /ml was added into the T-25 flask containing 



complete media. The cells were checked daily under 

inverted microscope and the subculture was fed by 

removing  the  existing  media  and  replenished  with 

fresh complete media.



Rabeta et al./IFRJ 20(2): 551-556

553


Cell plating

Cell  growth  was  observed  under  inverted 

phase-contrast  microscope.  Firstly,  the  cells  were 

trypsinized and then centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 4 

mins.  Subsequently,  the  supernatant  was  discarded 

and  the  cells  were  resuspended  with  1  mL  PBS. 

Again, the cells were centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 4 

mins. Once the supernatant was discarded, the cells 

were  resuspended  with  3  mL  of  incomplete  media 

(incomplete media = basal medium + 1% penicillin-

streptomycin).  Then,  the  cell  suspension  was  well 

mixed  and  15  µL  of  cells  was  added  to  15  µL  of 

trypan blue in a small vial for cell counting using the 

hemocytometer. The cells were diluted to obtain 3000 

cells  in  each  60  µL  using  incomplete  media.  Cells 

of 60 µL were dispensed into each well of a 96-well 

microtitre plate and incubated at 37

o

C and 5% CO



(Freshney, 1994).



MTT assay

Each  cancer  cell  line  was  grown  in  a  96-well 

microtiter plate (Nunc, Denmark) in a final volume of 

120 μL culture medium per well. Each well contained 

3 x 10

3

 cells/well and was incubated for 24 hours in a 



5% CO

2

 incubator at 37



o

C. The cells were then treated 

with extracts of the fruits at doses of 0.78, 1.56, 3.125, 

6.25,  12.5,  25,  50  and  100  μg/mL  and  maintained 

at 37

o

C with 5% CO



2

 for 24,48 and 72 hours. After 

the incubation period, 0.5 mg/ml of MTT labelling 

reagent was added to each well. The microtiter plate 

was then incubated again for 4 hours at 37

o

C with 5% 



CO

2

.  Then,  the  formazan  crystals  were  solubilised 



with 100 μL of acidified-isopropanol. One hundred 

microlitre  distilled  water  was  added  into  each  well 

for further colour development. Absorbance of viable 

cells was measured using a spectrophotometric plate 

reader  (Multiskan  spectrum,  Thermo  Electron  Co., 

Waltham, Massachusetts, USA) at 570 nm (Freshney, 

1994).

Statistical analysis

Results  for  percentage  cell  viability  were 

reported  as  means  ±  standard  error  from  triplicate 

determinations.  Significant  differences  for  multiple 

comparisons  were  determined  by  one-way  analysis 

of  variance  (ANOVA)  followed  by  Duncan  test  by 

SPSS statistical package (ver.17.0). The p value less 

than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant.



Results and Discussion

Growth inhibition with water apple extract

Figures  1  and  Figure  2  showed  the  effects  of 

water  and  methanol  extracts  in  water  apple  using 

MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines and non cancer-

origin cells at 72 hours, respectively. In examining 

the  antiproliferative  effect  of  aqueous  extract  from 

water  apple,  it  was  found  to  have  the  strongest 

inhibitory  effect  when  non  cancer-origin  cell  lines 

were compared with cancer-origin cell lines. It was 

observed  that  the  viability  of  MCF-7  and  MDA-

MB-231  cells  were  reduced  in  extracts  at  high 

concentration,  the  viability  of  MCF-7  cells  were 

significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in methanol extract.

Based  on  results  obtained,  it  is  apparent  that 

water  apple  possesses  inhibiting  activity  on  two 

breast cancer origin cell lines, especially MCF-7 that 

is  hormone/estrogen  dependent  breast  cancer  cell 

line, and its activity is more prominent after 72 hours 

incubation  with  the  extract.  Some  studies  reported 

a  strong  correlation  between  phenolic  content  and 

antioxidant  activity  in  fruits,  vegetables  and  grains 

(Ismail et al., 2004; Dasgupta and De, 2007; Osman 



et al., 2009). From the study by Ling et al. (2010), 

water apple contains natural antioxidants. 

Studies also showed that the volatile oils isolated 

from Syzygium species by vacuum distillation contain 

a  high  percentage  of  terpenoids  and  γ-terpinene. 

Terpenoids  may  act  by  affecting  the  farnesylation 

of  ras  gene  product  in  premalignant  and  malignant 

cells  (Smith  and  Yang,  1994).  Limonene  has  been 

found to be effective in inhibiting the promotion or 

progression  stage  of  carcinogenesis  and  significant 

(p  <0.05)  in  inhibiting  rat  mammary  tumors. 

Limonene  has  also  been  found  to  cause  inhibition 

to primary differentiated mammary tumors by 7,12-

Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene  (DMBA)  which  is  a 

carcinogen. 

Results  from  this  study  indicate  that  the  water 

apple  has  antiproliferative  effects  on  MCF-7.  This 

may  be  due  to  the  involvement  of  polyphenols 

on  estrogen  metabolism,  hence  inhibiting  the 

proliferation of MCF-7 which is strongly estrogen-

dependant. Furthermore, it has also been suggested 

that  polyphenols  may  act  as  estrogen  agonists  or 

antagonists  in  different  contexts.  Thus,  several 

factors may play a role in determining the effect of 

polyphenols on breast cancer cell growth (Hakimuddin 

et al., 2008).

Growth inhibition with milk apple extract

The percentage of cell viability of MCF-7, MDA-

MB-231  and  HS-27  cell  line  for  treatment  with 

different  concentrations  of  aqueous  and  methanol 

extract  of  milk  apple  in  72  hours  are  presented  in 

Figure 3 and Figure 4, respectively.

According  to  the  figures,  there  is  a  significant 

increase (p <0.05) in cell viability for HS27 cell  and 



554

Rabeta et al./IFRJ 20(2): 551-556

decrease in cell viability for MCF-7 and MDA-MB-

231 cells at low concentration in 72 hours incubation 

with aqueous extract of milk apple. However, after 

incubation  with  methanol  extract  of  milk  apple  for 

72 hours, the cell viability of noncancer-origin cell 

lines (HS-27) showed significant decrease (p <0.05) 

starting from a concentration of 1.56 µg/mL, while 

cell  viability  for  cancer-origin  cell  lines  does  not 

show significant changes (p>0.05).

Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded 

that  milk  apple  possesses  antiproliferation  effects 

against  HS27  cell  and  growth-promoting  effects 

against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. This study 

can supports the finding by Khoo et al. (2008) that milk 

apple does not contain beta-carotene, which acts as 

an anticancer compound as discussed in the previous 

section. This can be explained by the whitish colour 

of milk apple, as beta-carotene is mostly present in 

fruits with yellow-orange colour. 



Treatment with malay apple extract

The effect of aqueous and methanol extracts of 

malay  apple  was  tested  against  MCF-7  and  MDA-

MB-231. Figures 5 and 6 exhibit the effect of these 

Figure  1.  Cell  viability  for  treatment  with  different  concentrations  of 

aqueous  extract  of  water  apple  for  72  hours. Values  are  expressed  as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a-c represents means for each concentration labelled with different letters 

were significantly different at p<0.05.

Figure  2.  Cell  viability  for  treatment  with  different  concentrations  of 

methanol extract of water apple for 72 hours. Values are expressed as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a-b represents means for each concentration labelled with different letters 

were significantly different at p<0.05.

Figure 3. Cell viability for treatment with different concentrations of 

aqueous  extract  of  milk  apple  for  72  hours. Values  are  expressed  as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a-b  represents  means  for  each  concentration  labelled  with  different 

letters were significantly different at p<0.05.

Figure  4.  Cell  viability  for  treatment  with  different  concentrations  of 

methanol  extract  of  milk  apple  for  72  hours.  Values  are  expressed  as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a-b represents means for each concentration labelled with different letters 

were significantly different at p<0.05.

Figure  5.  Cell  viability  for  treatment  with  different  concentrations  of 

aqueous extract of malay apple for 72 hours. Values are expressed as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a represents means for each concentration were not significantly different 

at p<0.05.

Figure  6.  Cell  viability  for  treatment  with  different  concentrations  of 

methanol extract of malay apple for 72 hours. Values are expressed as 

mean ± standard error (SE) of triplicate measurements.

a-b represents means for each concentration labelled with different letters 

were significantly different at p<0.05.



Rabeta et al./IFRJ 20(2): 551-556

555


extracts  in  increasing  concentrations  during  a  72 

hours period.

Both  figures  indicated  that  for  both  examined 

cancerous  cell  lines,  the  viability  of  cells  reduced 

constantly by increasing malay apple concentration. 

Cell viability for HS-27 showed significant increase 

(p <0.05) starting from concentration 25 µg/mL; while 

MDA-MB-231  did  not  show  significant  changes 

(p>0.05) after treatment with methanol extract.

Based  on  the  results  obtained,  the  methanol 

extract  of  malay  apple  displays  antiproliferative 

effects against MCF-7 cell line. The effect is more 

obvious after 72 hours of incubation (Figure 6). This is 

corroborated by the findings of Wongwattanasathien 



et al. (2010) that showed the antiproliferative effect of 

malay apple on MCF-7 cell line with The methanolic 

extracts  of  the  malay  apple  was  more  significant 

with  IC


50 

value  of  632.3  µg/ml.  The  polyphenilic 

effect  of  malay  apple  on  estrogen  metabolism  is 

presumed to be the antiproliferative cause of MCF-7, 

which  is  known  to  be  strongly  estrogen  dependent 

(Hakimuddin et al., 2008).



Conclusion

Based on results obtained, the water apple, malay 

apple, and milk apple possess antiproliferative activity 

against  cancer  origin  cell  lines  of  MDA-MB-231 

and  MCF-7. The  results  of  the  study  demonstrated 

that both water and methanolic extracts of the fruits 

decrease  the  viability  of  the  mentioned  cancerous 

cell  lines.  However,  the  influence  of  the  methanol 

extracts of the Malay apple was more significant with 

79% cell viability in the case of MCF7 at 72 hours 

(IC

50 


=632.3 µg/ml) that is categorized as a hormone/

estrogen dependent breast cancer cell line. Extracts of 

the three fruits did not exhibit significant effects for 

24 and 48 hour periods (p>0.05). Furthermore, it can 

be concluded that the fruits have anticancer activity 

as  demonstrated  in  previous  studies  on  different 

cancerous  cell  lines.  However,  knowing  the  exact 

compound  responsible  for  its  anticancer  properties 

will help in making appropriate formulations that can 

be used as anticancer agents in future. 



Acknowledgments

 

The  authors  are  thankful  to  Universiti  Sains 



Malaysia Short Term Grant 304/PTEKIND/6310065 

and School of Industrial Technology, USM.



References

Abdullah, N.H. and Yip, C.H. 2003. Spectrum of Breast 

Cancer  in  Malaysian  Women:  Overview.  World 

Journal of Surgery 27: 921-923.

Dasgupta,  N.  and  De,  B.  2007.  Antioxidant  activity  of 

some leafy vegetables of India: A comparative study. 

Food Chemistry 101: 471-474.

 Freshney, R.I. 1994. Culture of animal cells: a manual of 

basic technique: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Hakimuddin, F., Tiwari, K., Paliyath, G. and Meckling, K. 

2008. Grape and wine polyphenols down-regulate the 

expression of signal transduction genes and inhibit the 

growth  of  estrogen  receptor–negative  MDA-MB231 

tumors in nu/nu mouse xenografts. Nutrition Research 

28: 702–713.

Huang,  S.T.,  Yang,  R.C.,  Yang,  L.J.,  Lee,  P.N.  and 

Pang, J.H.S. 2003. Phyllanthus urinaria triggers the 

apoptosis  and  Bcl-2  down-regulation  in  Lewis  lung 

carcinoma cells. Life Sciences 72: 1705–1716.

Ismail,  A.,  Marjan,  Z.M.  and  Foong,  C.W.  2004.  Total 

antioxidant activity and phenolic content in selected 

vegetables. Food Chemistry 87: 581–586.

Janick,  J.  and  Paull,  R.E.  2008.  The  Encyclopaedia  of 

Fruit & Nuts, pp. 551-554, CAB International, United 

Kingdom.

Khoo, H.E., Amin, I., Norhaizan, M.E. and Salma, I. 2008. 

Carotenoid  content  of  underutilized  tropical  fruits. 

Plant Foods Human Nutrition 63: 170–175.

Ling,  L.T.,  Radhakrishnan,  A.K.,  Subramaniam,  T., 

Cheng, H.M. and Palanisamy, U.D. 2010. Assessment 

of Antioxidant Capacity and Cytotoxicity of Selected 

Malaysian Plants. Molecules 15: 2139-2151.

Locher, C., Burch, M., Mower, H., Berestecky, J., Davis, 

H., Van Poel, B., Lasure, A., Berghe, D.A., Vlietinck, 

A. 1995. Anti-microbial activity and anti-complement 

activity of extracts obtained from selected Hawaiian 

medicinal  plants.  Journal  of  ethnopharmacology 

49(1): 23-32.

Norsa’adah,  B.,  Rusli,  B.N.,  Imran, A.K.,  Naing,  I.  and 

Winn, T. 2005. Risk factors of breast cancer in women 

in Kelantan, Malaysia. Singapore Medicine Journal 46 

(12): 698.

Osman,  H.,  Rahim,  A.A.,  Isa,  N.M.  and  Bakhir,  N.M. 

2009. Antioxidant Activity  and  Phenolic  Content  of 



Paederia  foetida  and  Syzygium  aqueum.  Molecules 

14: 970-978.

Rabeta,  M.S.,  Suzana,  S.,  Ahmad  R.G.,  Fatimah,  A., 

Normah,    H.  and  Wan  Nazaimoon  W.M.  2008. 

Adiponectin Level And Risk Of Breast Cancer: A Case 

Control Study In Klang Valley, Malaysia.  Malaysian 

Journal of Health Science 5(2): 17-28.

Smith,  T.J.  and  Yang,  C.S.  1994.  Effects  of  Food 

Phytochemicals  on  Xenobiotic  Metabolism  and 

Tumorigenesis,  in  Food  Phytochemicals  for  Cancer 

Prevention I (Ed. Huang, M.T., Osawa, T., Ho, C.T. 

and  Rosen,  R.T.),  pp.  17-48,  American  Chemical 

Society, USA.

Vasco,  C.,  Ruale,  J.  and  Kamal-Eldin,  A.  2008.  Total 

phenolic  compounds  and  antioxidant  capacities  of 

major fruits from Ecuador. Food Chemistry 111: 816-

823.

Wicaksono, B.D., Handoko, Y.A., Arung, E.T., Kusuma, 



I.W., Yulia, D., Pancaputra, A.N. and Sandra, F. 2009. 

556

Rabeta et al./IFRJ 20(2): 551-556

Antiproliferative effect of the methanol extract of Piper 



crocatum ruiz & pav leaves on human breast (T47D) 

cells  in-vitro.  Tropical  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical 

Research 8 (4): 345-352.

Wong, K.C. and Lai, F.Y. 1996. Volatile constituents from 

the fruits of four Syzygium species grown in Malaysia. 

Flavour and Fragrance Journal 11: 61-66.

Wongwattanasathien,  O.,  Kangsadalampai,  K.  and 

Tongyonk, L. 2010. Antimutagenicity of some flowers 

grown  in  Thailand.  Food  and  Chemical  Toxicology 

48: 1045–1051.

Wu, J., Wu, Y. and Yang, B.B. 2002. Anticancer activity of 

Hemsleya amabilis extract. Life Sciences 71: 2161–

2170.


Zainal,  A.O.,  Zainudin,  M.A.,  and  Nor  Saleha,  I.T. 

2006.Malaysian  Cancer  Statistics-  Data  and  Figure 

Peninsular Malaysia 2006. National Cancer Registry, 

Ministry of Health Malaysia.




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə