International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research



Yüklə 118.3 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü118.3 Kb.

Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 36(1), January – February 2016; Article No. 42, Pages: 239-243                                            ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net 

 

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 



 

239


 

 

 

                                                                                                                          

 

 

Kala K



*

, V.T. Antony, Sheemole M.S, Asha Saji 

Research and Post Graduate Department of Botany, St.Berchmans College, Changanacherry, Kerala, India. 



*Corresponding author’s E-mail:

 

kalakarunakaran.karunakaran@gmail.com 



 

Accepted on: 08-12-2015; Finalized on: 31-12-2015. 

ABSTRACT 

Syzygium caryophyllatum (L.) Alston is red listed as a threatened species according to International Union of Conservation of Nature 

and Natural Resources. The various phytochemicals present in the fruit of this plant were analysed using Liquid Chromatography 

Mass Spectroscopy (LCMS) and their bio activities were predicted using Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances (PASS). Plants 

produce a variety of secondary metabolites that are not needed for the growth of plants but are essential for other uses such as 

protection, pollination etc. The results showed the presence of numerous phytochemicals such as terpenoids, carotenoids, alkaloids, 

carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds such as flavanoids, other compounds such as coumarins, saponins, glycosides and sterols. 

The activity spectra of compounds were predicted using the chemical formula reveals that the compounds present in pulp and seed 

are active against numerous diseases. Many pharmaceutical industries use computer aided programs for the designing of new drugs 

for diseases. The present study clearly shows the medicinal uses of the plant, signifies the consumption of raw fruit for preventing 

diseases and will be helpful for pharmaceutical industries for the designing of new drugs for diseases. The work also emphasises the 

need for conservation of the species.  

Keywords: Secondary metabolites, phytochemicals, LCMS analysis, PASS, sickle cell anaemia, gaucher disease.

 

 



INTRODUCTION 

lants  have  been  used  as  source  of  food  and 

medicine  by  man  from  the  beginning.  Effective 

remedy  of  ailments  with  minimal  side  effects  is 

provided by use of plants. The use of herbal medicines in 

India can be cited about 5000 years back. Recent studies 

made  by  the  WHO  state  that  80%  of  the  world 

populations rely on herbal medicines for their preliminary 

healthcare  and  in  developing  countries  its  use  may  be 

about  95%.  Some  countries  like  US  show  continuous 

increase in its use each year.

1

 Any part of the plant leaves, 



stem and stem bark, flowers, fruits, seeds, root, root bark 

or  the  plant  as  a  whole  may  be  used  as  medicine.  The 

medicinal properties of plants are due to the wide variety 

of  secondary  metabolite  like  the  flavanoids,  alkaloids, 

tannins, phenols, terpenoids etc, that are produced as an 

intermediate  or  by  product  of  the  reactions  of  primary 

metabolites.  They  are  sometimes  produced  as  response 

to adverse environmental condition in particular stages of 

development,  in  specialized  cells.    Some  secondary 

metabolites  may  also  be  species  specific  therefore  these 

phytochemicals  are  also  very  important  for  taxonomic 

research.

2

  They  may  be  used  by  plants  for  defense 



mechanism,  attractants  as  pollinators,  seed  dispersal, 

allelopathic agents, UV protectants, and signal molecules 

for nodule formation.

3

 The secondary metabolites are not 



needed  for  the  growth  of  the  plant  but  they  have  wide 

range  of  chemical  structures  and  biological  reactions. 

These  bioactive  compounds  provide  medicinal  property 

to a plant. 

Therefore the identification and characterization of these 

compounds  in  crude  plant  extracts  are  very  essential, 

which  can  further  lead  to  isolation  and  purification  so 

that it may be of use in pharmaceutical industry. 



Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston,  is  a  member  of 

Myrtaceae  family  with  edible  fruits.  Van  Rheed  (1678  – 

1703)  has  mentioned  it  as  ‘njara’  in  the  Hortus 

Malabaricus the first published work about the plants of 

Malabar.


4

 It is a small tree found in places where there is 

water.

5

 It is categorised as Endangered under the Red List 



category of the IUCN Red List of Threatened species.

6

 The 



leaves, bark and root of Syzygium caryophyllatum shows 

the  presence  of  alkaloids,  flavanoids,  phenols,  tannins, 

saponins, glycosides, triterpenoids, fats and fixed oilsthe 

leaves  of  this  plant  shows  hypoglycemic  activity  on 

alloxan  induced  diabetic  mice  and  potent  antioxidant 

activity was shown by root extracts of this plant.

7-9

 

The tree bears black globose fruits which are edible. The 



fruits are green when unripe and then it turns pale pink, 

pink  and  purplish  black  on  maturity.  The  fruit  bears  a 

crown  of persistent  calyx.  So far little  study  dealing with 

its fruits have been reported. Therefore the study aims to 

identify the different compounds present in the pulp and 

seed  of  fruit  of  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  by 

conducting the LCMS and PASS analysis and also to study 

its medicinal and nutraceutical properties. 



MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Taxonomic description of the plant 

Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston,  is  a  tree  up  to  6  m 

high; bark thick, reddish-brown; branchlets terete. Leaves 

simple,  opposite,  exstipulate;  petiole  up  to  4  mm  long, 

stout,  glabrous;  lamina  3-8  x  1.3-3.5  cm,  obovate  or 

obovate-oblong,  base  attenuate  or  acute,  apex  obtuse, 

Analysis of Bioactive Compounds Present in Syzygium caryophyllatum (L.) Alston Fruit

P

Research Article 



Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 36(1), January – February 2016; Article No. 42, Pages: 239-243                                            ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net 

 

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 



 

240


 

obtusely  acute  or  emarginate,  margin  entire,  glabrous, 

coriaceous,  brown  on  drying,  pellucid-dotted;  lateral 

nerves  many,  close,  slender,  prominent  looped  at  the 

margin  forming  intramarginal  nerve.  Flowers  bisexual, 

white, up to 5 mm across, in terminal corymbose cymes, 

inflorescence  branches  moderately  thick,  ascending. 

Calyx tube 2-2.5 mm long, turbinate, no thick disc. Petals 

calyptrate.  Stamens  numerous,  bent  inwards  at  the 

middle  when  in  bud,  2.5-3.5  mm  long.  Ovary inferior,  2-

celled, ovules many; style 1; stigma simple. Fruit a berry, 

up  to  5  mm  across  globose,  green  then  turns  purplish 

black when ripe. 

Collection and authentication 

The  ripe  fruits  of  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston 

were collected from various localities and these collected 

samples  were  authenticated  from  the  Regional 

Herbarium Kerala (RHK) at S. B College, Changanacherry, 

Kerala. 


About  100  fruits  were  collected  from  each  locality  and 

they  were  rapidly  processed  on  the  same  day.  The 

collected  fruits  were  rapidly  washed  under  running  tap 

water to clean off dust and dirt particles. Wrinkled fruits 

were discarded. The rest of the fruits were dried at room 

temperature  using  an  air  blower.  Fully  dried  fruits  were 

packed in polypropylene bags sealed and stored at -20

o

 C 



for future use. 

Extraction 

The  pulp  (fleshy  part)  along  with  its  outer  peel  was 

separated  from  the  seed  manually.  The  residue  of  the 

pulp which was left on the seeds were washed off and the 

seeds  were  taken.  Both  (pulp with  peel  and  seeds)  were 

dried  under  hot  –  air  oven  and  then  ground  into  a  fine 

powder  in  a  coffee  grinder  and  stored  in  airtight 

containers. 3 g of the pulp and the seed were separately 

extracted  using  petroleum  ether  (60  –  80◦C)  and 

methanol  sequentially  using  30ml  of  the  corresponding 

solvent.  The  extracts  were  then  dried  and  dissolved  in 

10ml petroleum ether and ethanol (HPLC Grade, Merck). 

It  was  then  filtered  through  0.20mm  membrane  filter. 

The extract was used for this analysis. 



LCMS analysis 

10µl  of  the  filtered  sample  was  then  injected  to  the 

manual  injector  using  a  micro  syringe  (1  -  20µl, 

Shimadzu).The  mobile  phase  used  was  water:  methanol 

(50: 50) in an isocratic mode. The column used was RP – C 

– 18 (phenomenex). The separated compounds were then 

ionized using APC method and using split mode (50: 50). 

The  flow  rate  was  maintained  to  2ml/mn  with  a 

temperature  25±  2

o

C.  The  class  VP  integration  software 



was  used  for  the  data  analysis.  The  Library  used  for  the 

analysis was Metwin – LS. The version of the library was 

version 1.0 – 52.09. 

PASS 

The  activity  spectra  of  the  phytochemical  compounds 

were  predicted  using  the  computer  programme  PASS 

(Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substance).

10-12

 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 



The  primary  and  secondary  metabolites  are  the  wide 

range of organic compounds synthesized by plants. Apart 

from  carbohydrates,  lipids,  proteins  and  nucleic  acids 

primary  metabolites  include  phytosterols,  amino  acids 

and  organic  acids.  These  have  vital  role  in  plant 

metabolism  such  as  photosynthesis,  respiration,  growth 

and development whereas secondary metabolites that is 

comparatively produced in higher concentration in some 

species  of  plants  is  not  used  in  plant  metabolism  rather 

have  other  functions  like  protection  from  microbes, 

attractants  for  pollination,  allelopathic  agents,  UV 

protectants, signal molecules etc. Secondary metabolites 

are  also  used  as  waxes,  gums,  dyes,  flavoring  agents, 

drugs, perfumes etc. 



Primary metabolites 

The primary metabolites present in the pulp and seed of 



Syzygium caryophyllatum (L.) Alston are as follows: 

Sugars 

Fructose  was  detected  in  the  pulp.  The  presence  of 

sucrose and deoxyribose was detected from seeds. 

Amino acids 

Amino acids present in pulp were asparagine and cystine 

and serine was obtained from seed. Amino acid derivative 

like  Diaminobutyric  acid  was  obtained  from  pulp.  Amino 

acid related compound (Betalins) like Betalamic acid was 

present in pulp and Dopaxanthin was present in seed. 



Fatty acids and Lipids 

Table  1:  Shows  the  presence  of  Fatty  acids  present  in 

pulp and seed. 



 

Pulp 

Seed 

Hexanoic acid 

√ 



Linoleic acid 



√ 

Linolenic acid 



√ 

Alpha linolenic acid 



√ 

Alpha licanic acid 



√ 

Palmitic acid 



√ 

√ 

Stearic acid 

√ 

Decanoic acid 



√ 

Palmitic  acid  is  the  only  fatty  acid  present  in  both  pulp 



and  seed.  Hexanoic  acid,  linoleic  acid  and  linolenic  acid 

were  present  in  the  pulp  and  alpha  linolenic  acid,  alpha 

licanic acid, decanoic acid and stearic acid were present in 

the seed. 



Secondary metabolites 

The secondary metabolites are those that instigate more 

curiosity among the researchers since they are protective 

in  function  and  lower  the  risk  of  most  diseases.  The 



Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 36(1), January – February 2016; Article No. 42, Pages: 239-243                                            ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net 

 

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 



 

241


 

secondary metabolites  that  was  present  in  the  pulp  and 

seed  of  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  are  as 

follows: 



Terpenoids 

Terpenoids  play  a  very  important  role  in  the  growth, 

development,  reproduction  and  defense  of  plants.  Its 

presence  gives  plants  fragrance.

13

  Both  pulp  and  seed 



reported its presence. 

Table 2: Shows the presence of terpenoids 

 

Pulp 

Seed 

Alpha vetivone 

√ 

Betulin 



√ 

Isodonal 



√ 

Lupulone 



√ 

Phytol 



√ 

Beta citronellal 



√ 

√ 

Friedelin 



√ 

√ 

Beta citronellal and Friedelin were found in both seed and 

pulp. 

Carotenoids 

Carotenoids  give  plants  economical  value  in  ornamental 

garden. They are also used as food addictives. They play a 

significant  role  in  Vitamin  A  metabolism  which  is  an 

uncompromising  factor  for  growth  and  development  in 

children.

14

  The  pulp  of  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.) 



Alston contained crocetin. 

Alkaloids 

Very  few  alkaloids  were  present  in  pulp  and  seed. 

Alkaloids usually provide bitter taste but it also has other 

significant 

uses. 

They 


also 

exhibit 


numerous 

bioactivities.

13

  Nicotine  and  nornicotine  were  present  in 



pulp hydroquinidine and ambellin in seed. 

Carboxylic acid 

Table 3: Carboxylic acids present were as follows 

Pulp 

Mevalonic acid 

Ethyl paramethoxy cinnamate 

Seed 

Pipecolic acid 

Azelaic acid 

Lupic acid 

Succinic acid 

Melilotic acid 



Phenolic compounds 

Simple phenols 

Simple  phenol  compounds  like  methyl  phenol  was 

present in pulp and hydroquinone in the seed. 

Flavonoids 

The  flavonoids  are  the  polyphenols  with  C

6

–  C


3

  -  C


6

 

structure.  They  show  very  good  antioxidant  activity, 



anticancer activity etc.

15

 



Table 4: Shows presence of flavonoids 

 

Pulp 

Seed 

Liquiritegenin 

√ 

 

Quercetin 



√ 

√ 

Kaempferol 

√ 

 

Isoquercetin 



 

√ 

Dihydroxyflavan 



 

√ 

Kaempferide 



 

√ 

Quercemeritrin 



 

√ 

Hydroxyflavan 



 

√ 

Quercetin methyl ester 



 

√ 

More  number  of  flavanoids  were  found  in  the  seed. 



Quercetin was present both in the pulp and seed. 

Phenyl propanoids 

They  are  organic  compounds  that  are  synthesized  by 

plants  from  the  amino  acid  phenylalanine.  Caffeic  acid 

glucoside  was 

present  in 

pulp 


and  methoxy 

cinnamaldehyde in seed. 



Phenolic acids 

Phenolic acids are of two types as derivatives of benzoic 

acid and derivatives of cinnamic acid. 

Table 5: Shows presence of phenolic acids 

Pulp 

Parahydroxy benzoic acid 

Hydroxymethyl benzoicacid 

Ferulic acid 

Caffeic acid 

Seed 

Gallic acid 

Ferulic acid 

Caffeic  acid  is  abundantly  found  in  most  fruits  and 

vegetables and ferulic acid is common in cereals.

16

 Ferulic 



acid was found to be present in both pulp and seed. 

Coumarins 

Coumarins mainly occur in higher plants its concentration 

being  the  highest  in  fruits  followed  by  roots,  stem  and 

leaves. 


Coumarins 

are 


benzopyrones 

having 


anticoagulant,  free  radical  scavenging,  anticancer,  anti-

inflammatory and many such activities.

17

 

Table  6:  Coumarins  present  in  the  pulp  and  seed  are 



tabulated below. 

 

Pulp 

Seed 

Xanthotoxin 

 

√ 

Xanthatoxin 



√ 

 

Xanthatoxol 



√ 

 

Xanthotoxol 



 

√ 

Scopoletin 



√ 

 

Wedelolactone 



 

√ 


Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 36(1), January – February 2016; Article No. 42, Pages: 239-243                                            ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net 

 

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 



 

242


 

Coumarins  such  as  Xanthotoxin,  xanthotoxol  and 

Wedelolactone  were  present  in  seed.  Xanthatoxin, 

Xanthatoxol and scopoletin were present in pulp. 



Saponins 

Saponins  are  compounds  that  form  foams  and  act  as 

emulsifying  agents.  They  have  expectorant,  anti-

inflammatory  activity  and  can  inhibit  cholesterol 

adsorption,  besides  they  also  have  good  hypertensive, 

cardiac depressant properties, and insecticidal, antifungal 

activities etc.

18,19


 Acetyl oleonolic acid was found in pulp 

and seed. 

Apart  from  these  other  phytochemicals  like  Jambolin  a 

glycoside was present in pulp as well as seed. Ergosterol 

was  present  in  seed.  Ergosterol  is  considered  as 

provitamin of calciferol. 



PASS Activity of compounds 

The  biological  activity  spectrum  is  defined  as  a 

compounds  intrinsic  property  depending  on its  structure 

and  physiochemical  activity.  It  depends  on  nature  of 

compound  such  as  structure  and  physicochemical 

property, the sex, age and type of the target species and 

also  the  mode  and  route  of  treatment.  Various 

comparisons  and  algorithms  are  used  to  suggest  its 

activity  against  specific  target.  Nowadays  many  of  the 

pharmaceutical industries are using Computer Aided Drug 

Design for their new drug research and development, and 

PASS has proven to be 300% more than the estimation by 

skilled expert.

11 


 

Table 7: Showing activity of compounds 

Caffeic acid 

Membrane 

integrity 

agonist, 

Mucomembraneous 

protector, 

Apoptosis 

agonist, 

Hypercholesterolemic,  Choleretic,  Sickle  cell  anaemia  treatment,  Cytoprotectant,  Antihypoxic, 

Antiseborrheic, Eye irritation, Fibrinolytic, Pulmonary hypertension treatment 



Ferulic acid 

Membrane 

integrity 

agonist, 

Mucomembraneous 

protector, 

Apoptosis 

agonist, 

Hypercholesterolemic,  Choleretic,  Cytoprotectant,  Pulmonary  hypertension  treatment,  Myocardial 

ischemia treatment, Eye irritation, Fibrinolytic, Carminative, Vasodilator – cerebral, Sigma receptor 

agonist. 

Gallic acid 

Creatininase  inhibitor,  Sickle  cell  anaemia  treatment,  Fibrinolytic,  Antiseptic,  Mucomembraneous 

protector, Antiseborrheic, Antiinflammatory – intestine, Free radical scavenger, Coccolysin inhibitor, 

Pitrilysin inhibitor, Non mutagenic – Salmonella, Cardioprotectant. 



Palmitic acid 

Sickle  cell  anaemia  treatment,  Fibrinolytic,  Mucomembraneous  protector,  Antiseborrheic,  Skin 

disease  treatment,  Sclerosant,  Carnosine  synthesis  inhibitor,  Cholesterol  synthesis  inhibitor, 

Hypercholesterolemic, 

Lipid 

metabolism 



regulator, 

Antihypoxic, 

Antiviral 

(Arbovirus), 

Cytoprotectant,  Alopecia  treatment,  Eye  irritation  (inactive),  antithrombotic,  platelet  adhesion 

inhibitor,  proline  racemase  inhibitor,  acidifying  agent  gastric,  Antimutagenic,  erthropoietin, 

Leucolysin inhibitor, fibrinolytic, antitoxic, metabolic disease treatment, corticosteroid side – chain 

isomerase treatment. 



Quercetin 

Vascular  (peripheral)  disease  treatment,  membrane  integrity  agonist,  capillary  fragility  treatment, 

membrane 

permeability 

inhibitor, 

antiseborrheic, 

antineurotoxic, 

cytoprotectant, 

mucomembraneous protector, chemoprotective. 

Xanthotoxol 

Radio  protector,  dependence  treatment,  vascular  (peripheral)  disease  treatment,  amyotrophic 

lateral sclerosis treatment, membrane integrity agonist, myocardial ischemia treatment. 

Linoleic acid 

Gaucher  disease  treatment,  skin  disease  treatment,  muco  membraneous  protector,  lipid 

metabolism  inhibitor,  antiseborrheic,  antithrombotic, Pulmonary  hypertension  treatment,  antiviral 

(arbovirus),  cytoprotectant,  sickle  cell  anaemia  treatment,  eye  irritation  treatment,  sclerosant, 

platelet adhesion inhibitor, skin irritation, hypercholesterolemic, cholesterol synthesis inhibitor. 

Friedelin 

Hypercholesterolemic, hepatic disorder treatment, cardiovascular analeptic. 



Pipecolic acid 

Proline  racemase  inhibitor,  fibrinogen  receptor  antagonist,  neuroprotector,  convulsant,  opoid 

dependency  treatment,  amyotrophic  lateral  sclerosis  treatment,  fibrinolytic,  acute  neurologic 

disorder  treatment,  gaucher  disease  treatment,  dopamine  release  stimulant,  urologic  disorders 

treatment. 


Int. J. Pharm. Sci. Rev. Res., 36(1), January – February 2016; Article No. 42, Pages: 239-243                                            ISSN 0976 – 044X  

 

 



International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research 

Available online at 

www.globalresearchonline.net 

 

© Copyright protected. Unauthorised republication, reproduction, distribution, dissemination and copying of this document in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. 



 

243


 

 

CONCLUSION 



Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  is  a  small  sized  tree 

with  edible  fruits  which  is  naturally  distributed  near 

ponds  and  water  bodies.  In  the  present  study  the 

phytochemical  analysis  of  fruit  and  seed  of  Syzygium 



caryophyllatum  using  Liquid  Chromatography  Mass 

Spectroscopy  (LCMS)  shows  the  presence  of  various 

secondary  metabolites.  Terpenoids  like  beta  citronellal 

and  friedelin,  flavanoids  such  as  Quercetin  and  Phenolic 

acids  such  as  ferulic  acid  were  obtained  from  both  pulp 

and  seed.  It  is  seen  that  more  carboxylic  acid  and 

flavanoids  compounds  were  obtained  from  seed.  The 

coumarins  such  as  Xanthotoxin,  xanthotoxol  and 

Wedelolactone  were  present  in  seed;  xanthatoxin, 

xanthatoxol  and  scopoletin  in  the  pulp.  Other 

phytochemicals  like  acetyl  oleonolic  acid  -  saponin; 

jambolin  –  glycoside  were obtained  from  seed  and  pulp. 

Very few alkaloids were obtained from the pulp and seed. 

The  medicinal  property  of  the  plant  may  be  due  to  the 

presence of these phytochemicals. 

The  Prediction  of  Activity  Spectra  for  Substances  of 

selected  compounds  points  out  that  they  are  active 

against various diseases. Compounds such as Caffeic acid, 

Palmitic  acid,  Gallic  acid  and  Linoleic  acid  showed  >70% 

activity  against  sickle  cell  anaemia;  along  with  these 

compounds 

Quercetin 

activity 

predicted 

as 

mucomembraneous protector. Pipecolic acid and Linoleic 



acid  is  predicted  to  be  active  for  gaucher  disease 

treatment.  Pipecolic  acid  shows  neuroprotector  activity. 

The study serves as a  stepping stone for designing novel 

drugs  using  this  plant  and  can  be  recommended  for  use 

after preclinical trial using animals and clinical trials using 

humans.  Even  though  the  fruits  are  edible  its 

consumption is less, it may be due to small size of fruit or 

lack  of  availability.  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  is  listed  as 

endangered  species  by  IUCN  it  may  be  due  to  the 

destruction of habitat of the species for urbanization and 

industrialization.  The  results  obtained  from  our  study 

shows  that  the  plant  has  many  significant  compounds 

that  are  of  pharmaceutical  importance  and  therefore  its 

conservation is very important. 



REFERENCES 

1.

 



Rivera  J.D,  Loya  A.M,  Ceballos  R,  Use  of  Herbal  Medicines 

and  Implications  for  Conventional  Drug  therapy  Medical 

Sciences, Altern Integ Med, 2, 6, 2013, pages 1 – 6, 130 doi: 

10. 4172/ 2327 - 5162. 1000130. 

2.

 

Ramasubramania  Raja  R,  Sreenivasulu  M,  Medicinal  plants 



secondary  metabolites used  in  pharmaceutical  importance, 

World  Journal  of  Pharmacy  and  Pharmaceutical  Sciences, 

4(4), 2015, 436 – 447. 

3.

 



Veberic  Robert,  Bioactive  Compounds  in  fruit  plants, 

Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, 2010, 4. 

4.

 

Manilal K.S, Van Rheed’s Hortus Malabaricus English Edition 



with  annotation  and  Mordern  Botanical  nomenclature,  Vol 

5, University of Kerala, 2003, 99 – 101. 

5.

 

Sivarajan  V.V,  Indira  Balachandran,  Ayurvedic  drugs  and 



their  plant  sources,  Oxford  and  IBH  Publishing  Co  Pvt  Ltd, 

New Delhi, 1994, 190. 

6.

 

The  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species.  Available  from:  



24 November 2015). 

7.

 

Savitha 



Rebeque 

C, 


Padmavathy 

S, 


Comparative 

phytochemical analysis of S. caryophyllatum (L.) Alston and 



S. densiflorum Wall., Scientia, 7(1), 2011, 125 – 131. 

8.

 



Savitha Rebeque C, Padmavathy S, Hypoglycaemic effect of 

S.  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  on  alloxan  induced  diabetic 

albino mice, Asian J Pharm Clin Res, 6(4), 2013, 203 – 205. 

9.

 

Savitha Rabeque C, Free Radical Scavenging potential of root 



extracts  of  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston,  Am.  J. 

Pharm Health Res, 2(9), 2014, 112 – 120. 

10.


 

Filimonov  D.A,  Poroikov  V.V,  Karaicheva  E.I,  Kararyan  R.K, 

Boudunova  A.  P,  Mikhailovsky  E.M,  Rudnitskih  A.V, 

Goncharenko L.V, Burov, Yu V, Computer aided prediction of 

biological activity spectra of chemical substance on the basis 

of  their  structural  formulae;  computerized  system  PASS, 

Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology (Rus), 8(2), 1995, 56 

– 62. 


11.

 

 John  De  Britto  A,  Leon  Stephen  Raj  T,  Abiya  Chelliah  D, 



Prediction  of  Biological  Activity  Spectra  for  Few  Anticancer 

Drugs  Derived  from  Plant  Sources, Ethnobotanical  Leaflets, 

12, 2001, 801 – 810. 

12.


 

Filimonov 

Dmitry, 

Poroikov 

Vladimir, 

Probabilistic 

Approaches  in  Activity  Prediction,  Chemoinformatics 

approaches  to  Virtual  Screening  Eds,  Chapter  6,  Alexandre 

Varnek and Alex Tropsha, RSC Publishing, 2008, 182 – 216. 

13.


 

Saxena  Mamta,  Saxena  Jyothi,  Rajeev  Nema,  Dharmendra 

Singh, Abhishek Gupta, Phytochemistry of Medicinal Plants, 

Journal  of  Pharmacognosy  and Phytochemistry,  1(6),  2013, 

168 – 182. 

14.


 

Crozier Alan, Clifford M.N, Ashihara Hiroshi, Plant Secondary 

Metabolites – Occurance, Structure and Role in the Human 

Diet, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2006, 332 – 341. 

15.

 

Ghasemzadeh  Ali,  Ghasemzadeh  Neda,  Flavonoids  and 



Phenolic  acids:  Role  and  biochemical  activity  in  plants  and 

human, J Med Plants Res, 5(31), 2011, 6697 – 6703. 

16.

 

Dai  Jin,  Mumper  J  Russell,  Plant  phenolics:  Extraction, 



Analysis  and  their  antioxidant  and  anticancer  properties, 

Molecules, 15, 2010, 7313 – 7352. 

17.

 

Jain  P.K,  Joshi  Himanshu,  Coumarin:  Chemical  and 



Pharmacological  profile,  Journal  of  Applied  Pharmaceutical 

Science, 2 (6), 2012, 236 – 240. 

18.

 

Oakenfull  David,  Saponins  in  food  –  a  review,  Food 



Chemistry, 6, 1981, 19 – 40. 

19.


 

Ezeabara  A.C,  Okeke  C.U,  Aziagba  B.O,  Ilodibia  C.V,  Emeka 

A.N,  Determination  of  Saponin  content  of  various  parts  of 

six Citrus species, International Research Journal of Pure and 

Applied Chemistry, 4(1), 2014, 137 – 143.

 

 



Source of Support: Nil, Conflict of Interest: None. 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə