Issn: 2044-2459; e-issn: 2044-2467



Yüklə 152.97 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü152.97 Kb.

British Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology 4(6): 215-221, 2013                   

ISSN: 2044-2459; e-ISSN: 2044-2467 

© Maxwell Scientific Organization, 2013 

Submitted: February 16, 2013                         Accepted: March 11, 2013 

Published: December 25, 2013 

 

Corresponding Author:  S.  Adeola Adesegun, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Lagos State University, Ojo 

Lagos State, Nigeria, Tel.: +234-802-308-1364 

215 


 

Essential Oil of Syzygium samarangense; A Potent Antimicrobial and Inhibitor of Partially 

Purified and Characterized Extracellular Protease of Escherichia coli 25922 

 

S. Adeola Adesegun, O. Folorunso Samuel, B. Ojekale Anthony, 



B. Ogungbe Folasade and S. Kayode Mary 

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Lagos State University, Ojo Lagos State, Nigeria 

 

Abstract: Volatile oils being secondary metabolites are phytoactive ingredients found in medicinal plants and may 

be active against various infectious microorganisms. The present study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial 

effect of the volatile oil from the  leaf of Syzygium samarangense on  Escherichia coli and its inhibition on the 

extracellular protease of this organism. The volatile oil inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli with IC

50

 of 0.42% 



(v/v). The extracellular protease of this organism exhibited highest activities at pH 7.0 and 43°C. This enzyme was 

moderately activated by the chloride salts of Zn

2+

, K


+

  and Cu


2+

. The set of chloride salts of Ba

2+

, Pb


2+

, Hg


2+

  and 


Mg

2+

, Mn



2+

, Co


2+

, Ca


2+

, Fe


2+

 were, respectively strong and mild inhibitors against the activity of this enzyme. The 

line weaver burke kinetic plot indicated a competitive mode of inhibition by the volatile oil on the enzyme with 

V

max



 of 8.33×10

µmol/min and the K



m

 in the absence and presence of the volatile oil (inhibitor) were 0.23 mg/mL 

and 1.25 mg/mL, respectively. The highest percentage yield during purification was 66.3 and the highest purification 

fold  was11.9 as compared to the crude enzyme. Sephadex G-100 gel filtration produced one peak each for total 

protein and enzyme activity. Therefore, the volatile oil from the leaf of Syzygium samarangense may possess 

antimicrobial activity and its inhibitory effect on the extracellular protease of Escherichia coli may be one of its 

modes of action on the pathogenic organisms. 

 

Keywords: Antimicrobial, Escherichia coli, extracellular protease, inhibitor, Syzygium samarangense, volatile oil 

 

INTRODUCTION 



 

Man, since creation, has been dependent on plants 

for food, shelter, clothing and medicine. Medicinal 

plants are herbs that contain phytoactive components 

known to modern and ancient civilization for their 

healing properties. These medicinal plants used for 

disease remedies could be in any usual  forms such as 

infusions, decoctions, tinctures, syrups, infused oils, 

essential oils, ointments and creams (Leslie, 2004; 

Green, 2000; Chancal, 2006).  Syzygium  samarangense 

(Myrtaceae) is a deciduous tree commonly known as 

Semarang apple. The fruits of this plant are used in 

traditional medicine to cure diabetes (Shahreen  et al., 

2012). The oils extracted from Syzygium samarangense 

(Blume)  contain  γ-terpene  (28.5%),  α-pinene (18.2%) 

and  β-cymene (13.7%) as some of the essential 

components (Gao  et al., 2012). Essential/volatile 

(ethereal) oils have been found to be one of the active 

ingredients of the medicinal plants (Singh et al., 2002; 

Lawless, 1995; Jansen  et al., 1987).  They are 

concentrated, hydrophobic liquid containing volatile 

aromatic compounds (Lima et al., 1993). Some of these 

aromatic compounds have been isolated and 

characterized, with antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral 

and antiprotozoal properties (Danuta, 1998). These oils 

give various scents to medicinal plants (Watt et al., 

1962). The volatile oils have been used as part of active 

ingredients in the manufacture of antiseptics and 

disinfectants (Hoffman, 1987) and they have found 

their applications in the production of pharmaceutical 

and household cleaning products (Kurt, 1998). 

Escherichia coli  (Enterobacteriaceae) are enteric, 

facultative, anaerobic, gram-negative, rod-like bacteria 

that live in the intestinal tracts of healthy and disease 

animals (Eckburg et al., 2005). Minimal cell density of 



Escherichia coli at the gastrointestinal tract of man 

could be beneficial. Symbiotically, vitamin K

2

 (Bentley 



and Meganathan, 1982) in man is partly synthesized by 

the intestinal fauna colonization of these bacteria. 

However, higher cell density of these bacteria could be 

responsible for flatulation, stomach upset, induced 

diarrhoea, colitis, Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), soft 

tissue infections, bacteraemia and neonatal meningitis 

(Todar, 2007).  Certain strains like Enteroinvasive  and 

Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli are highly 

virulent  and pathogenic (Vogt and Dippold, 2002). 

Virulence factors enable Escherichia coli and its strains 

to colonise and invade adjacent mucosal uro-epithelium 

tissue layer by invoking inflammatory reactions (Todar, 

2007). These human pathogens produce extracellular 

proteases with which they accomplish their 


 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

216


 

pathophysiological roles (Holder and Haidaris, 1979). 

Extracellular proteases are strategically used by these 

pathogens to digest host cellular surface glycoprotein at 

the epithelial layer of the gastrointestinal lining thereby 

facilitating    host invasion and colonization  (Crowther  



et al., 1987; Stewart-Tull et al., 1986). 

The wide use of antibiotics in the treatment of 

bacterial infections has led to the emergence and spread 

of resistant strains (Kapil, 2005). The emergence of 

Multiple Drug Resistant bacteria (MDR) has become a 

major cause of failure in the treatment of infectious 

disease by antibiotics (

Livermore, 2002; Costerton and 

Anwar, 1994; Gibbons et al., 2003, 2004;

 

White et al., 



2002;

 

Sanders  et al.,  1977



). The need for alternative 

natural antibiotics may be one of the ways of 

complementing the presence failing drugs. 

This study 

aims at assessing the antimicrobial effect of the volatile 

oil of Syzygium samarangense and its mode of 

inhibition on partially purified extracellular protease of 

Escherichia coli.  

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

Collection 

of plant material: Identified and 

authenticated leaves of Syzygium  samarangense  were 

obtained as green foliage from the botanical garden of 

Lagos State University, Ojo Lagos State, Nigeria. The 

leaf sample was air-dried for a week. 

 

Microorganism:  The  Escherichia coli 25922  used  in 

this study was obtained from the Department of 

Microbiology, Nigeria Institute of Medical Research 

(NIMR) Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria. The isolate was 

maintained at 37°C in a disposable petri dishes 

containing nutrient agar for 24 h and then stored at 4°C. 



 

Extraction of volatile oil  of  Syzygium samarangense 

by hydrodistillation: This was done according to the 

procedure of Lawrence and Reynolds (1993). Briefly, 

600  g of the dried leaves of Syzygium samarangense 

were introduced into the 5 L 34/35 Quick fit round 

bottom flask containing 1.5 L distilled water with fixed 

Clevenger. The oil was extracted at a steady 

temperature of 80°C for 3 h and the oil was collected 

over 2 mL n-hexane. The oil was kept tightly in a 

sample bottle and stored at 4°C until it was used. 

 

Bacteria growth inhibition and determination of 

IC

50 

of the volatile oil: The antimicrobial activity of 

the volatile oil extracted from Syzygium samarangense 

was tested against the growth of Escherichia coli 25922 

and the inhibitory concentration required to clear off 

50% of the bacterial growth was estimated. This was 

done by using microbroth dilution technique in nutrient 

broth following a modified method described by 

Akujobi and Njoku  (2010). Briefly,  a colony of the 

organism was added to 200 µL of susceptible test broth 

(prepared with 0.5%  v/v Tween-80) containing two-

fold serial dilutions of the volatile oil in the microtitre 

plate (21.5 cm by 17 cm). The plate was covered and 

incubated under anaerobic condition at 37°C for 24 h. 

After 24 h, each inoculum from the microwell was re-

inoculated into a fresh nutrient broth and growth 

inhibition of the bacteria was spectrophotometrically 

determined at 620 nm using a microplate reader after 18 

h of anaerobic incubation at 37°C. The degree of 

percentage growth inhibition was estimated using the 

formula: 

 

100


1

×



o

o

A

A

A

 

 



where,  

A



 

= The absorbance of the well in the absence of 

volatile oil  

A

1 



 

= The absorbance of the well in the presence of 

volatile oil 

 

Production of extracellular protease: This was done 

according to the procedure of Makino et al. (1981). 

Escherichia coli  25922  was re-inoculated under 

anaerobic condition into 5.0 mL freshly prepared 

nutrient broth in McCartney bottle and this was 

incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The dirty cloudy microbial 

broth formed was centrifuged at 9000 rpm for 10 min. 

The supernatant of this microbial broth was stored in a 

sample bottle at 4°C until it was used. This supernatant 

was used as a crude source of extracellular protease. 

 

Protein determination: Total protein of the crude 

enzyme extract was determined using Lowry et al

(1951) method. This was done by adding 5.0 mL of 

alkaline solution containing a mixture of 50 mL of 

solution X (20 g sodium trioxocarbonate IV and 4 g 

sodium hydroxide in 1L) and 1mL  of solution Y (5 g 

cupper II tetraoxosulphate VI pentahydrate and 10 g 

sodium-potassium tartrate in 1L) to 0.1 mL of crude 

enzyme extract and mixed thoroughly. The solution was 

allowed to stand for 10 min at room temperature and 

0.5 mL of freshly prepared Folin Ciocalteau’s phenolic 

reagent (50% v/v) was added. The solution was mixed 

thoroughly and the absorbance was read at 750 nm after 

30 min. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was used as 

standard protein (0.20 mg/mL). 

 

Enzyme assay: The extracellular proteolytic activity of 



Escherichia coli  25922  was assayed using Folin and 

Ciocalteau (1927) method. This was carried out by 

adding 5.0 mL of casein solution (0.6% w/v in 0.05 M 

Tris buffer at pH 8.0) to 0.1 mL of the crude enzyme 

extract and the mixture was incubated for 10 min at 

37

o



C. The reaction mixture was stopped by adding 5.0 

mL of a solution containing 0.11 M trichloroacetic acid, 

0.22 M NaCl and 0.33 M acetic acid mixed in ratio 

1:2:3. The turbid solution was filtered and 5.0 mL of 

alkaline solution was added to 1.0 mL of the filtrate 


 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

217


 

followed by 0.5 mL of freshly prepared Folin 

Ciocalteau’s phenolic reagent after 10 min of thorough 

mixing. The absorbance was read at 750 nm after 30 

min. L-tyrosine solution (0.20 mg/mL) was used as 

standard for the protease activity.  A unit of protease 

activity was defined as the amount of enzyme required 

to liberate 1.0 µmol of tyrosine in 60 sec at 37°C. The 

specific activity was expressed in units of enzyme 

µmol/min/mg protein. 

 

Determination of optimum pH of the enzyme 

activity: The method adopted was described by Makino 

et al. (1981) with little modification. This was carried 

out by adding 5.0 mL  of 0.6% w/v  casein solution in 

0.05 M Tris buffer (pH ranges from 6.0-8.5), as 

substrate, to 0.1 mL of the crude enzyme extract and the 

enzyme assay was carried out at 37°C for 10 min as 

earlier described. 

 

Determination of optimum temperature of the 

enzyme activity: As described by Makino et al. (1981), 

5.0 mL of 0.6%w/v casein in 0.05 M Tris buffer at pH 

8.0 was mixed with 0.1 mL of crude enzyme extract 

and the enzyme assay was carried out at temperature 

range of 30-60°C for 10 min. The reaction was stopped 

and enzyme activity was carried out at each stage of 

temperature. 

 

Inhibitory assay: The method adopted was described 

by Makino et al. (1981)

 

with a slight difference. 



Briefly, 0.1 mL of the crude enzyme extract and 0.1 mL 

of 3.5% v/v of the volatile oil in 0.5% v/v Tween 80 

solution were added concomitantly to different 

concentration of casein solution (0.2-1.0% w/v) in 0.05 

M Tris buffer at pH 8.0 and the reaction mixture was 

mixed and incubated at 37°C for 10 min. The reaction 

was stopped by adding 5.0 mL of a solution containing 

0.11 M trichloroacetic acid, 0.22 M NaCl and 0.33 M 

acetic acid mixed in ratio 1:2:3. Protease assay was 

carried out as earlier described  above. The procedure 

was repeated without an inhibitor. 

 

Effect of metallic chloride salts: Following the 

method  described  by  Jahan  et al. (2007) with little 

modification, the extracellular protease activity was 

carried out in the presence of 1.0 mM chloride salt 

solutions of Hg

2+

, Pb


2+

, Ca


2+

,

 



Cu

2+

,



 

Ba

2+



, Co

2+

, Fe



2+

,

 



Mg

2+

, Mn



2+

, Zn


2+

  and K


+

. Briefly, to 0.1  mL  of the 

crude enzyme extract, 1.0  mL  of each chloride salt 

solution and 5.0 mL of different concentration of casein 

solution (0.2-1.0% w/v) in 0.05 M Tris buffer at pH 8.0 

were concomitantly added and the reaction mixture was 

mixed and incubated at 37°C for 10 min. The reaction 

was stopped by adding 5.0 mL of a solution containing 

0.11 M trichloroacetic acid, 0.22 M NaCl and 0.33 M 

acetic acid mixed in ratio 1:2:3. Protease assay was 

carried out as described above. 

 

Dialysis: The crude enzyme extract was dialyzed (using 

SIGMA    Dialysis   Tubing   Cellulose   Membrane,   D 

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Fig. 1:  Growth inhibition of Escherichia coli 25922  by the 



volatile oil of Syzygium samarangense 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Fig. 2:  Effect of pH on the caseinolytic activity of 



extracellular protease of Escherichia coli 25922 

 

9402), at room temperature, with 55%  w/v saturated 



solution of ammonium sulphate for 48 h in 0.05 M Tris 

buffer solution (pH 8.0). The solution was centrifuged 

(Kendros Pico Biofuge, Heraeus) at 5000 rpm for 10 

min to separate the protein residue. After reconstituting 

in Tris buffer, both total protein and protease activity 

were assayed. 

 

Gel  filtration:  Three gram of Sephadex G-100 was 

soaked in 100 mL Tris buffer for 72 h. The soaked gel 

was poured into a capillary tube (20×2) cm

2

 with a flow 



rate of 0.33 mL/min. Little sodium azide salt was added 

to the top of the gel overnight to prevent bacterial 

growth.  Five  mL of separated 55% w/v ammonium 

sulphate dialysate was introduced on top of the gel and 

was filtered using Tris buffer (0.05 M, pH 8.0, at room 

temperature) as mobile phase. Fifty fractions of 3 mL 

each were collected. Protein and enzyme activity were 

determined at 750 nm. 

 

RESULTS 

 

The volatile oil from the leaves of Syzygium 



samarangense inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli 

25922  as shown in Fig. 1.  The IC

50

  of this oil as 



estimated from the graph was 0.42% (v/v). 

0.220


0.210

0.200


0.190

6.0


6.5

7.0


7.5

8.0


8.5

pH

O



D

 

7



5

0

 n



m

-1.50


-1.00

-0.50


0.00

 0.50


 1.00

 1.50


2.00

Log conc of the volatile oil (%v/v)

1.4

1.2


1.0

0.8


0.6

O

D



 

 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

218


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Fig. 3:  Effect of temperature on the caseinolytic activity of 



extracellular protease of Escherichia coli 25922 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Fig. 4:  Effect of metallic chloride ions on the caseinolytic 



activity of extracellular protease of Escherichia coli 

25922 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Fig. 5:  Line weaver burke plot showing the kinetic inhibition 

of Syzygium samarangense volatile oil (SSVO) on the 

caseinolytic activity of extracellular protease of 

Escherichia coli 25922 

 

Figure 2 and 3  show  the effects of pH and 



temperature on the activity of extracellular protease of 

Escherichia coli

  25922.


  This enzyme exhibited optimal 

activities  at 7.0 and 43°C, respectively. However, the 

activity of this enzyme was moderately high between 

pH 6.7 and 8.2. There was a steady increase in the 

enzyme activity between 40-45°C. 

Figure 4 shows the effect of metallic chloride ions 

on the activity of this extracellular protease. Ba

2+

, Pb



2+

 

and Hg



2+

  were strong inhibitors of this enzyme. Mg

2+



Mn



2+

, Co


2+

, Ca


2+

  and Fe


2+

  were mild inhibitors. 

Conversely, Zn

2+

, Cu



2+

  and K


+

  were moderate 

activators of this enzyme. 

The kinetic inhibition of the volatile oil of 



Syzygium samarangense against the caseinolytic 

activity of the extracellular protease of Escherichia coli 

is shown in Fig. 5. From this line weaver burke plot, the 

volatile oil as inhibitor exhibited competitive inhibition 

with V

max


  of 8.33×10

µmol/min and the K



m

  in the 

absence and presence of volatile oil were 0.23 and 1.25 

mg/mL, respectively. 

The purification profile of the crude extracellular 

protease of Escherichia coli is  shown in Table 1.  The 

highest percentage yield obtained during purification 

was 66.3 and 11.9 as the highest purification fold as 

compared to the crude extract. 

Figure 6 shows the chromatogram for Sephadex G-

100 elution profile. One peak each was obtained for 

both total protein and enzyme activity. 



 

DISCUSSION 

 

In this study, the volatile oil from the leaves of 



Syzygium samarangense was used to inhibit the growth 

of  Escherichia coli under anaerobic condition. In 

addition, the kinetic activity of the extracellular 

protease of this organism was examined under the 

influence of this essential oil as inhibitor in order to 

determine one of the ways by which this plant exhibits 

its antimicrobial activity. This volatile oil showed a 

noticeable growth inhibition of Escherichia coli under 

favourable condition. Venkata and Venkata Raju (2008) 

have been able to show the antibacterial effect of the 

organic extract of the fruits of this plant against both 

gram negative and positive bacteria. Joji and Beena 

(2011), after isolating the components of the volatile oil 

from the leaves of this plant, suggested that the broad 

antimicrobial activity of this plant may have been as a 

result of synergistic effect of the phytoconstituents 

present in this oil. Eucalyptin was one of the two 

flavonoids successfully extracted from Syzygium 



alternifolium  species (Pulla et al.,  2005) and this 

flavonoid was reported to possess antimicrobial activity 

(Takahasi et al., 2004) against some gram positive and 

negative pathogenic bacteria. The infusing volatile oil 

as an antimicrobial agent generally has ability to disrupt 

cell membrane thereby increasing their permeability to 

this oil and causes the biological functions of key 

proteins to be inhibited and this is followed by cell 

lysis. 

0.330


0.290

0.250


0.170

30.0


40.0

60.0


Temperature ( C)

°

O



D

 

7



5

0

 n



m

50.0


0.210

-5 0


.

1/[s][mg/mL]^-1

-4 0

.

-3 0



.

-2 0


.

-1 0


.

0.0


1.0

2.0


3.0

4.0 5.0


No inhibitor 

SSVO


[1

/V

o



][

m

o



l/

m

in



]^

-1

1



0

^5

µ



×

100.0


80.0

60.0


40.0

20.0


0.0

1.38


1.38

1.39


1.39

1.40


1.40

1.41


1.41

1.42


1.42

C

on



tr

o



B

a2

+



P

b2

+



H

g2

+



M

g2

+



M

n2

+



C

o

2+



C

2+

a

F

e2

+



Z

n

2+



K

+

C



u2

+

0.1 mM metallic chloride solution  



A

c

ti



v

it

y



 (

7

5



0

n

m



)

 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

219


 

Table 1: Summary of purification procedures 

Purification steps 

Total protein (mg) 

Total activity 

(µmol/min) 

Specific activity 

(µmol/min/mg protein) 

Percentage yield 

Purification fold 

Crude enzyme 

126 


8600 

68.30 


100 

1.00 


55% (NH

4

)



2

SO

4



 

65 


8500 

130.8 


98.8 

1.90 


Gel filtration 

5700 



814.3 

66.3 


11.9 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Fig. 6: Sephadex G-100 gel filtration elution profile 

 

The relatively high and stable activity of the 



extracellular protease of this organism at pH 6.7-8.2 

could have been one of the reasons  why this organism 

survives in the fore and the hind guts of GIT especially 

in warm blooded animals. More importantly, this type 

of protease is likely to be neutral protease (Fig. 2). 

Ordinarily, this type of organism hardly cause 

infections but prolong flora habitation and acquired 

genetophynotypic variation can make them virulence 

and therefore capable of causing infections such as 

gastroenteritis,  Urinary Tract Infections  (UTI) and 

neonatal meningitis. In rarer cases, virulence strains are 

also responsible for hemolytic-uremic syndrome, 

peritonitis,  mastitis,  septicemia  and gram-negative 

pneumonia (Todar, 2007). Similarly, the activity of this 

extracellular protease increased steadily between 40-

45

o



C  (Fig. 3). Some strains of Escherichia coli have 

been found to thrive well at 49°C (Fotadar et al., 2005). 

This enzyme therefore might just be one of the strategic 

proteins that make this organism to survive relatively 

high temperature and this is persistently correlated to 

the characteristics of this bacterium as contaminant of 

body openings (vagina, anus, nostrils, ears and mouth), 

dairy products, food, meat, fish and confectioneries. 

The present result may not totally support the 

extracellular protease of Escherichia coli to be 

metalloenzyme, because none of the metallic chloride 

used in this study was able to significantly stimulate the 

activity of this enzyme more than the control (native 

enzyme) when subjected to casein hydrolysis. The 

activity of this enzyme in the presence of Zn

2+

, Cu



2+

 

and K



was not different from the control. Ba

2+

, Pb


2+ 

and Hg


2+

 strongly inhibited the activity of this enzyme 

while Mg

2+

, Mn



2+

, Co


2+

, Ca


2+

 and Fe


2+

 mildly inhibited 

the enzyme. 

The volatile oil of Syzygium samarangense 

competitively inhibited the activity of extracellular 

protease of Escherichia coli 

25922

  indicating  that this 

volatile oil is potentially capable of reducing the 

catalytic activity of the extracellular protease of 

Escherichia coli  by binding to the active site of the 

enzyme thereby preventing the real substrate from 

binding and consequently reduce the affinity of the 

enzyme for the substrate. This may be possible as a 

result of structural resemblance of the component (s) of 

the volatile oil and the enzyme substrate. This may be 

an open way discovery of phytoactive drug capable of 

arresting similar gram-negative facultative human GIT 

pathogenic organisms. 

The highest purification fold obtained as compared 

to the extract was 11.9. The highest specific activity 

was 814.3 µmol/min/mg protein. The elution 

chromatogram revealed a peak each for both total 

protein and enzyme activity. Further works are needed 

to elucidate on the nature and molecular weight of this 

protein. 

The essential oil from the leaf of Syzygium 

samarangense  was found to be active against 

Escherichia coli 

25922 


and can be used as either 

bacteriostatic or bactericidal  agent to prevent or  treat 

bacterial infections. This study has shown Syzygium 

samarangense  to be a  source of compound(s) with 

possible antimicrobial activities and more 

pharmacological investigations will be necessary to 

validate its medical applications. 



 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

 

The authors wish to acknowledge the efforts of the 



entire laboratory technologists in the Department of 

Total protein 

0.05

T

o



ta

p



ro

te

in



 (

O

D



)

7

5



0

n

m



0.04

0.03


0.02

0.01


1

8

15



22

29

36



43

50

0.60



0.61

0.62


0.63

0.64


0.65

Elution fractions

E

n

z



y

m

e



 a

c

ti



v

it

y



 (

O

D



)

7

5



0

n

m



Enzyme activity

 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

220


 

Biochemistry, Lagos State University, Ojo Lagos State 

Nigeria  for the release of chemicals and Mr 

Omonigbeyin  EO  from Nigeria Institute of Medical 

Research, Yaba Lagos State Nigeria for his technical 

input in this study.  

 

REFERENCES 

 

Akujobi, C.O. and H.O. Njoku, 2010. Bioassay for the 



determination of microbial sensitivity to Nigerian 

honey. Global  J. Pharmacol., 4(1): 36-40. 

Bentley, R. and R. Meganathan, 1982. Biosynthesis of 

vitamin K (menaquinone) in bacteria. Microbiol. 

Rev., 46(3): 241-280. 

Chancal, C., 2006. History of western herbal medicine. 

J. Clin. Aromath., 470(309): 67-100. 

Costerton, W. and H. Anwar, 1994. Pseudomonas 



aeruginosa Infections and Treatment. The Microbe 

and Pathogen, pp: 1-17. 

Crowther, R.S., N.W. Roomi, R.E.F. Fahim and J.F. 

Forstner, 1987. Vibro cholerae metalloproteinase 

degrades intestinal mucin and facilitates 

enterotoxin-induced secretion from rat intestine. 

Biochem. Biophys. Acta, 924: 393-402. 

Danuta, K., 1998. Antifungal activity of the essential oil 



Melaleuca auternifolia against pathogenic fungi In 

Vitro. Skin Pharmacol., 9(6): 288-294. 

Eckburg, P.B., E.M. Bik, C.N. Bernstein, E. Purdom, L. 

Dethlefsen, M. Sargent, S.R. Gill, K.E. Nelson and 

D.A. Relman, 2005. Diversity of the human 

intestinal microbial flora.  Science,  308(5728): 

1635-1638. 

Folin, O. and V. Ciocalteau, 1927. On tyrosine and 

tryptophan determinations in proteins. J. Biol. 

Chem., 73: 627-650. 

Fotadar, U., P. Zaveloff and L. Terracio, 2005. Growth 

of  Escherichia  coli  at elevated temperatures. J. 

Basic Microbiol., 45(5): 403-404. 

Gao, Y., H. Qiuping and L. Xican, 2012. Chemical 

composition and antioxidant activity of essential 

oil from Syzygium samarangense  (BL.) Merr. et 

Perry flower-bud.  J. Complement. Med. Drug 

Discov., 2: 23-33. 

Gibbons, S., E. Moser and G.W. Kaatz, 2004. Catechin 

gallates inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) in 

Staphylococcus    aureus.    Planta    Med.,  70(12): 

1240-1242. 

Gibbons, S., M. Oluwatuyi, N.C. Veitch and A.I. Gray, 

2003. Bacterial resistance modifying agents from 



Lycopus europaeus. Phytochemistry, 62(1): 83-87. 

Green, J., 2000. The Herbal Medicine Maker's 

Handbook: A Home Manual. Chelsea Green 

Publishing, Freedom CA, pp: 168. 

Hoffman, D.L., 1987. The Herb User’s Guide. 

Thorsons, Publishing Group, Wellingborough, UK. 

Holder, I.A. and C.G. Haidaris, 1979. Experimental 

studies of the pathogenesis of infections due to 



Pseudomonas  aeruginosa: Extracellular protease 

and elastase as in  vivo  virulence factors. Can. J. 

Microbiol., 25: 593-599. 

Jahan, T., A.B. Zinat and S. Saheedah, 2007. Effect of 

some metals on some pathogenic bacteria. 

Bangladesh J. Pharmacol., 2: 71-72. 

Jansen, A.M., J.J. Scheffer and S. Baarheim, 1987. 

Antimicrobial activity of essential oils: A 1976-

1986 literature review: Aspects of test methods. 

Plant Med., 53(5): 395-398. 

Joji, R. and J. Beena, 2011. Chemical composition and 

antibacterial activity of the volatile oil from the 

leaf of Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. and 

L.M. Perry. Asian J. Biochem. Pharmaceut. Res., 

3(1): 263-269. 

Kapil, A., 2005. The challenge of antibiotic resistance: 

Need    to    contemplate. Indian J. Med. Res., 121: 

83-91. 


Kurt, S., 1998. Advanced Aromatherapy:  The Science 

of Essential Oil Therapy. Healing Arts Press,

 

Rochester, Vt. 



Lawless, J., 1995. The illustrated encyclopaedia  of 

essential oil. Brit. J. Aromath., 43(7): 152-160. 

Lawrence, B.M. and R.J. Reynolds, 1993. Progress in 

essential oils. Perfum. Flavor, 19: 31-44. 

Leslie, T., 2004. The Healing Power of Rainforest 

Herbs: Milam County. TX 77857. Retrieved from: 

http://www.rain-tree.com/prepmethod.htm. 

Lima, E.O., O.F. Gompertz, A.M. Giesbrecht and M.Q. 

Paulo, 1993. In vitro antifungal activity of essential 

oils obtained from officinal plants against 

dermatophytes. Mycoses, 36(9-10): 333-336. 

Livermore, D.M., 2002. Multiple mechanisms of 

antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas 

aeruginosa:  Our  worst nightmare? Clin. Infect. 

Dis., 34: 634-640. 

Lowry, O.H., N.J. Rosebrough, A.L. Farr and R.J. 

Randall, 1951. Protein measurement with Folin 

phenol reagent. J. Biol. Chem., 193: 265-275. 

Makino, K., K. Tomihiko, N. Tsutomu, I. Tomio and K. 

Masaomi, 1981. Characteristic studies of the 

extracellular protease of Listeria monocytogenes. J. 

Biol. Chem., 133: 1-5. 

Pulla, R.N., R.V. Narahari Reddy and D. Gunasekhar, 

2005. Chemical 

constituents of Syzygium 



alternifolium  (Wt.) Walp. Proceeding of UGC-

National Seminar on Role of Chemistry in Drug 

Development Strategies, pp: 13-14. 

Sanders, W.E., E.C. Hartwig, N.J. Schneider, R. 

Cacciatore and H. Valdez, 1977. Susceptibility of 

organisms in the Mycobacterium  fortuitum 

complex to antituberculosis and other antimicrobial 

agents.  Antimicrob. Agents  Ch.,  12: 295-297. 



 

 

Br. J. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 4(6): 215-221, 2013 

 

221


 

Shahreen, S., B. Joyanta, H. Abdul, R. Shahnaz, T.Z. 

Anahita, S. Abu, H.C. Majeedul and R. 

Mohammed, 2012. Antihyperglycemic activities of 

leaves of three edible fruit plants (Averrhoa 

carambola

Ficus 

hispida 

and 


Syzygium 

samarangense) of Bangladesh. Afr J. Tradit 

Complement Altern Med., 9(2): 287-291. 

Singh, G., I.P.S. Kapoor, S.K. Pandey, U.K. Singh and 

R.K. Singh, 2002. Studies on essential oils: Part 

10; Antibacterial activity of volatile oils of some 

spices. Phytother. Res., 16(7): 680-682. 

Stewart-Tull, D.E.S., R.A. Ollar and T.S. Scobic, 1986. 

Studies on the Vibro cholerae mucinase complex. 

I. Enzyme activities associated with the complex. J. 

Med. Microbiol., 22: 325-333. 

Takahasi, T., R. Kokubo and M. Sakaino, 2004. 

Antimicrobial activity of Eucalyptus  leaf extracts 

and flavonoids from Eucalyptus maculate. Lett. 

Appl. Microbiol., 39: 60-64. 

Todar, K., 2007. Pathogenic Escherichia coli". Online 

Textbook of Bacteriology. 

Department of 

Bacteriology,  University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Retrieved from: http:// www. text book of 

bacteriology. net/e. coli.html. 

Venkata, R.K. and R.R. Venkata Raju, 2008. In vitro 

antimicrobial screening of the fruit extracts of two 



Syzygium  species  (Myrtaceae).  Adv. Biol. Res., 

2(1-2): 17-20. 

Vogt, R.L. and L. Dippold, 2002. Escherichia coli 

O157: H7 outbreak associated with consumption of 

ground beef. Public Health Rep., 120(2): 174-178. 

Watt, J.M., B. Breyer and M. Gerdina, 1962. The 

Medicinal and Poisonous Plants of Southern and 

Eastern Africa. 2nd Edn., Pub. E & S Livingstone, 

Edinburgh, pp: 1457. 

White, D.G.S., S. Zhao, S. Simgee, D.D. Wanger and 

P.F. McDermott, 2002. Antimicrobial resistance of 

food    borne      pathogens.    Microbes    Infect.,    4: 



405-412.  

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə