Issn 2320-3862 jmps 2017; 5(1): 261-265 2017 jmps received: 18-11-2016 Accepted: 19-12-2016 ji abok



Yüklə 148.95 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü148.95 Kb.

 

~ 261 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 2017; 5(1): 261-265

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



ISSN 2320-3862 

JMPS 2017; 5(1): 261-265 

© 2017 JMPS 

Received: 18-11-2016 

Accepted: 19-12-2016 

 

JI Abok 

Department of Chemistry, 

Faculty of Sciences, Federal 

University Lafia-Nigeria. 

Nasarawa State, Nigeria. 



 

C Manulu 

Department of Chemistry, 

Faculty of Natural Sciences 

University of Jos, Jos-Nigeria. 

Plateau State, Nigeria. 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence 

JI Abok 

Department of Chemistry, 

Faculty of Sciences, Federal 

University Lafia-Nigeria. 

Nasarawa State, Nigeria. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



TLC analysis and GC-MS profiling of Hexane 

extract of Syzygium guineense Leaf

 

 

JI Abok and C Manulu 

 

Abstract

 

Introduction:  Syzygium  guineense  leaf  and  bark  of  are  used  for  the  treatment  of  tuberculosis,  chronic 

diarrhea, cough, dysentery, malaria, amenorrhea, wounds, ulcers, rheumatism and infections.  

Material  and  Method:  The  various  compounds  in  the  n-hexane  extract  of  the  leaf  were  analysed  by 

TLC and identified by GC-MS technique. The TLC results indicated that four (4) terpenes are present in 

hexane extracts of the leaf of Syzygium guineense after treating TLC plates with vanillin-Conc.H

2

SO



4

.  


Results: The results of the GC-MS analysis revealed twelve (12) compounds in the n-hexane extract of 

Syzygium guineense leaf. These are 1-ethyl-2-methylbenzene (2.61%), Ylangene (2.42%), decahydro-4a-

methyl-1-methylene-7-(1-methylethynyl)-naphthalene 

(γ-muurolone) 

(2.47%), 

4-dimethyl-7-(1-

methylethenyl)azulene(2.06%), caryophyllene oxide(3.86%), myristic acid (2.11%), n-hexadecenoic acid 

(11.94%),  9-octadecanoic  acid  (25.72%),  tetratriacontane  (31.45%),  1,2-benzenedicarboxylic  acid 

(2.71%), tetratriacontane (6.70%) and pentatriacontane (3.95%). These compounds fall into three classes; 

terpene/terpenoids,  organic  acids  and  hydrocarbons  with  the  major  compounds  been  the  organic  acids 

42.48%. Hydrocarbons constituent 42.1% of the extract while only 0.38% constitute terpenes/terpenoids. 



Conclusion: The results of this study offer a basis of using S. guineense leaf as an alternative medicinal 

agent as anti-inflammatory analgesic, antipyretic and platelet-inhibitory actions. 



 

Keywords:

 

Syzygium guineense leafTLC, GC-MS, Terpenes. 



 

1. Introduction 

Plants  are  described  as  “nature’s  chemical  factories”  which  may  contain  natural  substances 

that  exhibit  bioactive  properties  by  producing  a  definite  physiological  action  on  the  human 

body  when  administered 

[1]

.  Such  derived  compounds  are  reported  to  be  less  toxic  and  even 



more effective in fighting diseases 

[2]


. For instance, natural compounds have provided the best 

anti-malarials  known  to  date  with  quite  a  number  awaiting  investigation 

[3]

.  Isolating  and 



elucidating  structures  of  different  chemical  constituents  in  a  plant  is  a  basic  task  in  the  drug 

discovery  process 

[4,  5]

.  In  some  cases  the  crude  extract  is  more  effective  pharmacologically 



than the purified bioactive compound from the extract. Synergy between the identified active 

compounds  with  other  compounds  present  in  seems  to  add  to  pharmacological  activity 

[3,  1]



Natural  products  introduces  new  chemical  entities  of  wide  structural  diversity  that  will  are 



templates for semi-synthetic and total synthetic modification. Apart from plants, other natural 

sources are yet to be fully tapped from planktonic organisms to mammals. Intensive research is 

still  needed through concerted cooperation to explore the biological activity of all sources of 

natural products as core scaffolds for future drugs 

[6]

. New approaches to drug discovery, such 



as combinatorial chemistry, and computer-based molecular modeling design cannot replace the 

important role of natural products in drug discovery 

[6]

.  


This research is carried out to analyse and identify the phytochemical constituents of Syzygium 

guineense  leaf  extracts.  The  leaf  and  bark  of  this  plant  are  used  for  the  treatment  of 

tuberculosis,  chronic  diarrhea,  cough,  dysentery,  malaria,  amenorrhea,  wounds,  ulcers, 

rheumatism  and  infections.  The  investigation  involves  extracting  the  leaves  with  organic 

solvents, concentrating the extracts, thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of the extracts, 

and  spectra  analysis  using  hyphenated  technique  of  gas  chromatography-mass  spectrometry 

(GC-MS).  This  work  seeks  to  establish  a  scientific  basis  for  the  application  of  Syzygium 



guineense by herbal practitioners.  

Syzygium  guineense  is  a  member  of  the  family  Myrtaceae.  It  is  an  evergreen  water  loving 

dicotyledon which grows to a height of 8 – 15 metres 

[23]

. In Africa, the plant is distributed in 



Nigeria, Senegal, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Zaire, Rwanda, Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe,  

 

~ 262 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

Namibia,  Uganda,  Swaziland,  Cameroon,  and  South  Africa. 



In  Nigeria,  it  is  known  by  different  names  depending  on  the 

dialect  such  as  afour  (Afizere/Jarawa),  molmol  (Hausa)  and 

ori  (Yoruba).  The  root,  bark  and  leaf  are  used  in  traditional 

medicine  as  remedy  for  various  ill  health  conditions.  A 

mixture of water and powder made from the bark and roots of 

the  plant  when  administered  act  as  a  purgative 

[18]

.  Similar 



preparation is applied as a remedy for dysentery, diarrhea and 

treatment of stomach ache 

[19]

Syzygium guineense  extract  is 



used  against  Naja  katiensis  venom 

[20]


.  Gastro-intestinal 

upsets can also be remedied by using this plant 

[22]

.  


The crude extract of the plant has shown anti- mycobacterium 

activity  and  anti-diarrheal  activity  in  tested  organisms 

[18,  23]

The  aqueous  extract  exhibited  antibacterial  activity  against 



Salmonella E., Shigella D., Shigella F., E.  coli, Enterobacter 

A. 

[21]


.  Essential  oil  consituents  of  the  dried  leaf  include 

caryophyllene  oxide,  cadinene,  viridiflorol,  epi-α-  cadinol, 

cadinol, 

cis-calamenen-10-ol, 

citronellyl 

pentanoate, 

caryophyllene  and  humulene 

[22]

.  Betulinic  acid,  oleanolic 



acid,  2-hydroxyoleanolic  acid,  2-hydroxyursolic  acid, 

arjunolic  acid,  asiatic  acid,  terminolic  acid,  6-hydroxyasiatic 

acid,  arjunolic  acid  28-glucopyranosyl  ester  and  the  asiatic 

acid 


28-glucopyranosyl 

ester 


were 

reported 

[21]



Arabinogalactan polysaccharide was isolated from the Malian 



leaf 

[24]


. Essential oils extracted from dried leaves of Syzygium 

guineense  collected  in  Benin  analysed  by  GC-MS  contain 

caryophyllene  oxide  (7%),  δ-cadinene  (7.5%),  viridiflorol 

(7.5%),  epi-α-cadinol  (9.8%),  α-cadinol  (12.7%),  cis-

calamenen-10-ol  (14%),  citronellyl  pentanoate  (15.2%),  β-

caryophyllene (20.1%) and α-humulene (39.5%) 

[22]


.   

Arjulonic 

acid, 

Terminolic 



acid, 

2,3,23-Trihydroxy-

(2α,3β,4α)  olean-11-en-28  oic  acid  and  asiatic  acid 

(Hydroxyasiatic  acid)  were  also  isolated  and  they  show 

antibacterial  activity  against  B.  subtilis,  E.  coli  and  Shigella 

sonnei 

[21]


.  Similarly  2α,  3β,  24-Trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-

oic  acid  isolated  from  the  same  plant  were  also  antibacterial 

activity  against  Planchonia  careya  and  Enterococcus 

vancomycin resistant 

[25]


The  plants  of  the  Family  Myrtaceae  are  dicotyledonous 

angiosperm shrubs and trees found in the tropics, sub-tropics 

and temperate Australia 

[9]

. They are characterised by radially 



symmetrical flowers with a reduced calyx (sepals) and corolla 

(petals)  and  numerous  stamens 

[9]

.  The  sepals  and  petals 



number  either  4  or  5  or  have  united  to  form  a  cap  over  the 

flower (as  with  the eucalypts) 

[9]

. The fruit is usually a berry 



or capsule. The leaves generally contain oil glands. There are 

closely 150 genera in this family. The total number of species 

seems  to  be  disputable  as  different  literature  report  gives 

different  number  of  species 

[9]

.  However  within  Myrtaceae



species  belonging  to  the  genera  Corymbia,  Myrtus,  Psidium

PimentaEugeniaPseuocaryophyllusSyzygiumEucalyptus

Leptospermum,  Plinia,  and  Malaleuca  are  reported  to  be 

widespread  compared  to  the  other  species.  Phytochemically, 

several members of this family mainly accumulate flavonoids, 

tannins,  other  phenolic  derivatives  and  Terpenoids 

[9]

.  The 


plant  families  particularly  rich  in  essential  oils  are 

compositae,  matricaria,  Labiatae,  menthe  spp;  Myrtaceae, 



Eucalyptus;  Rutaceae  and  Umbilliferae.  The  various 

compositions of terpenes can be markedly different from one 

species to another 

[7]


. Currently, there is an increased interest 

in  terpenoids  for  antibacterial,  antineoplastic,  and  other 

pharmaceutical functions 

[8]




Eucalyptus species are particularly abundant and have a wider 

range  of  distribution  than  the  other  myrtaceous  genera  since 

they  are  frequently  grown  as  exotics  in  commercial 

plantations 

[10]

.  Members  of  this  genus  are  used  in  folk 



medicine 

as 


antidiarrheal, 

antimicrobial, 

antioxidant, 

antirheumatic,  anti-inflammatory,  cleansing  agents  and  are 

also  known  to  be  effective  in  reducing  blood  cholesterol 

[11]


Majority  of  the  plants  are  also  known  to  produce  essential 

oils,  most  of  which  are  bacteriostatic,  fungistatic,  anti-

inflammatory  and  antifungal  activities  and  as  such  used  in 

creams, soaps and toothpastes 

[11]


. Leaf of Eugenia uniflora 

analyzed  by  GC-MS  majorly  contains  atractylone  and 

curzereneIt’s essential oils are active towards  gram-positive 

bacteria, Streptococcus equi and Staphylococcus epidermis 

[9]



Plinia  trunciflor  leaf  contains  α-cadinol,  apiole  and  cubenol 



majorly.  The  essential  oils  showed  activity  towards  gram-

positive Streptococcus equi and Staphylococcus epidermis 

[9]



In  P.  cattleianum,  the  most  prominent  compound  is 



caryophyllene  oxide 

[12]


.  Caryophyllene  oxide  is  the  main 

constituent  most  Psidium  species.  Where  variations  exist  in 

oil content and composition, it is attributable to factors related 

to  ecosystem,  the  environment  (temperature,  relative 

humidity,  irradiance  and  photoperiod),  genetics,  chemotypes 

and  the  nutritional  status  of  the  plant 

[12]

.  Acetylated 



glycosidic  flavonoids  in  genus  Syzygium  are  present  in  the 

genera Eugenia and Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) 

[12]



Syzygium  australe  and  Syzygium  leuhmannii  are  widespread 



in  tropical  and  subtropical  regions  of  South-East  Asia, 

Australia and Africa 

[13]

. The use of these plants as medicinal 



agent  is  common  with  Australian  aborigines.  Syzygium 

Cumini  is  found  throughout  India  up  to  an  altitude  of  1800 

meters  from  Myanmar  and  to  Afghanistan  and  in  other 

countries  like  Thailand,  Philippines  and  Madagascar 

[14]




Syzygium jambos (L.) is  widespread and traditionally used in 

sub-Saharan  Africa  particularly  Benin,  Democratic  Republic 

of Congo and Cameroon to treat infectious diseases 

[15]


. It has 

been  used  in  the  treatment  of  pernicious  attack,  amenorrhea, 

abdominal pain and diarrhea. This specie of  Syzygium is also 

distributed  in  Reunion  Island,  Central  America  (i.e. 

Guatemala)  and  Asia  (i.e.  Malaysia,  Nepal) 

[15]


.  Syzygium 

forrestii  is  an  evergreen  broad-leaved  tree  distributed  on  the 

mountain slopes (altitude range from 800 to 2400 m) endemic 

to Yunnan Province, in southwest of China 

[12]


.  

The  family  Myrtaceae  is  characterised  by  tannins  and 

flavonols  as  the  main  chemical  constituents.  The  isolated 

flavonoid,  myricitrin  seems  to  be  the  main  flavonoid  in  this 

family. This same flavonoid is present in Syzygium levinei and 

Syzygium  samarangense  while  (-)-epicatechol-3-O-gallate 

was  found  from  S.  samarangens 

[12]

.  Furthermore,  nilocitin, 



pedunculagin  and  gemin  D,  all  hydrolyzable  tannins  are 

present  in  Syzygium  aromaticum.  Similar  flavonoids  and 

hydrolysable  tannins  ar  contained  in  S.  forrestii.  Therefore, 

the flavonoid glycoside myricitrin and the three hydrolyzable 

tannins  can  serve  as  the  chemosystematic  markers  of  the 

genus Syzygium 

[12]



Methanol extracts of S. australe showed antimicrobial activity 



against  73%  of  the  gram-negative  bacteria  tested  and  67% 

gram-positive  bacteria  tested  had  their  growth  inhibited.  The 

leaf  extract  showed  non-activity  against  Enterobacter 

aerogenes,  Escherichia  coli,  Salmonella  salford,  Bacillus 

subtilis Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 

[13]


. The 

extract  displayed  antifungal  activity  against  a  nystatin 

resistant strain of A. niger but did not affect the growth of  C. 

albicans or S. cerevisiae 

[13]


. Acetone and aqueous extracts of 

Sjambos bark showed some  activity against  Staphylococcus 

aureus,  Yersinia  enterocolitica,  Staphylococcus  hominis

Staphylococcus cohnii and Staphylococcus warneri 

[15]


The  major  components  in  n-hexane  extracts  of  Syzygium 



 

~ 263 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

aromaticum identified using GC-MS are eugenol and eugenol 

acetate 

[16]


.  The  dichloromethane  extract  of  the  buds  yielded 

limonin  and  ferulic  aldehyde  along  with  eugenol  while  the 

ethanol  extract  yielded  the  flavonoids  tamarixetin  3-O-b-D-

glucopyranoside,  ombuin  3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside  and 

quercetin which showed strong antioxidant activity against 1, 

2-diphenyl  picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH) 

[16]

.The  leaf  of  Syzygium 



cumini  are  particularly  rich  in  acylated  flavonol  glycosides 

such  as  quercetin,  myricetin,  myricetin  3-O-(4”-acetyl)-α-L-

rhamnopyranoside  and  galloyl  carboxylase.  The  stem  bark  is 

rich  in  the  pentacyclic  triterpenoid,  betulinic  acid,  friedelin, 

epi-firedenalol,  β-sitosterol,  eugenin  and  fatty  acid  ester  of 

epi-fierdanalol,  quercetin,  kaempferol,  myrecitin,  gallic  acid, 

bergenins  and  ellagic  acid.  These  phytochemicals  are  also 

reported  present  in  the  flower  of  Syzygium  cumini 

[14]

.  β-


sitosterol is found in almost all parts of  Syzygium cumini 

[14]


Friedelin  (C

30

H

50



O),  a  pentacyclic  triterpenoid  and  epi-

friedelanol  (C

30

H

51



OH)  were  reported  in  the  plant 

[14]


Pharmacological  studies  on  activities  of  Syzgium  cumini 

revealed  that  it  is  gastro-protective,  anti-ulcerogenic,  anti-

inflammatory,  hypoglycemic,  a  ntioxidant  hypolipidaemic, 

anti-anaemic,  antibacterial,  and  radio-protective 

[14]


.  The 

flowers  are  rich  in  kaempferol,  quercetin  myricetin- 

(quercetin-3-glucoside), myricetin-3-L-arabinoside, quercetin-

3-D-galactoside,  dihydromyricetin,  oleanolic  acid,  acetyl 

oleonolic acid and eugenol 

[17]


. The root is rich in flavonoids 

glycosides.  One  of  the  varieties  found  in  Brazil  possesses 

malvidin-3-glucoside  and  petunidin-3-glycoside.  The  purple 

colour  of  the  fruit  is  due  presence  of  one  or  two  cyanidin 

diglycosides 

[17]


.  Cyanidin  diglycoside  are  sap  pigments  and 

the actual colour the express on the plant depends on the pH. 

The  fleshy  pericarp  contains  sterol 

[17]


.  Tannins,  cynidin 

glycoside, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid and friedelin are main 

constituents of Syzgium cumini L. The medicinal value of the 

plant was attributed to malic acid, oxalic acid and gallic acid. 

The  leaf  contains  essential  oils  with  pleasant  odour  which 

contains  limonene,  dipentene  (20%),  sesquiterpenes  of 

cadalane  type  (40%),  and  sesquiterpenes  of  azulene  type 

(10% or less) with yield and physical characteristics of the oil 

varying  according  to  the  season  of  collection 

[14]


.  Major 

component  of  the  essential  oil  appears  to  be  triterpene 

hydroxyl  acid,  oleanolic  acid 

[14]


.  The  seeds  contain  tannins, 

ellagic  acid,  gallic  acid,  a  glycoside-  jamboline,  starch, 

myricyl  alcohol  in  the  unsaponified  fraction  of  seeds  and  a 

small quantity (0.05%) of pale yellow essential oil 

[14]



Djipa  et  al  reported  that  different  studies  between  1982  and 



2007 have shown that the aqueous, methanol and ethyl acetate 

extracts  of  S.  jambos  Guatemala  leaf  possess  anti-

inflammatory  activity  while  the  ethanol  extract  showed 

antiviral  activity 

[15]

.  Myricetin  and  quercetin-3-O-β-D-



xylopyranosyl-(1-2)-α-L-  rhamnopyranosides  were  isolated 

from  the  active  extracts 

[15]

.  The  methanol  extract  of  the  leaf 



contain  ellagic  acid  derivatives:  3,  3’,  4’-tri-O-methylellagic 

acid-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside 

and 

3, 


3’, 

4’-tri-O-

methylellagic  acid.  Ellagitannins  (pedunculagin,  casuarinin, 

tellimagrandin  I,  strictinin,  casuarictin,  and  traces  of 

tellimagrandin  II)  were  detected,  as  in  several  other 

Myrtaceae, in the extract of Sjambos from Japan 

[15]

.  


 

2. Materials and Methods 

2.1 Plant Material 

Syzygium  guineense  leaves  were  collected  from  Shere  hills 

area  in  Jos  Plateau  state,  Nigeria  in  August,  2012.  The  plant 

was  authenticated  at  Federal  College  of  Forestry,  Jos  and  a 

herbarium  sample  deposited  with  voucher  number  FHJ  0947 

in the herbarium. The leaves of the plant were air dried under 

shade and stored in an air tight container for subsequent use.  



 

2.2 Preparation of Extracts 

Crude extract of n-hexane was prepared by soaking 500grams 

of coarsely pulverized leaf of the plant in 2 litres of n-hexane. 

This mixture was intermittently agitated for 72 hours at room 

temperature.  After  the  72  hours,  the  extract  was  decanted, 

filtered  and  concentrated  using  a  rotary  evaporator  to  give 

7.0grams  of  the  crude  n-hexane  extracts  and  the  yield 

calculated  and  the  n-hexane  crude  extract  was  kept  in  the 

refrigerator for analysis. 

 

2.3 TLC Analysis of Hexane Extract 

TLC analysis of hexane extract was carried out in the solvent 

mixtures 

1.

 



100% Hexane  

2.

 



Hex: EtOAc (3:1)  

3.

 



Hex: EtOAc (2:1) 

The  TLC  analysis  using  100%  hexane  didn’t  resolve  the 

components.  Analysis  with  Hex:  EtOAc  (2:1)  gave  three 

components  with  R

values  0.13,  0.23  and  0.84  while  Hex: 



EtOAc  (3:1)  gave  seven  components  with  R

values  of  0.07, 



0.13,  0.23,  0.32,  0.40,  0.54  and  0.81.  Conc.  H

2

SO



4

  was 


sprayed  on  the  plates  eluted  in  solvent  mixture  Hex:  EtOAc 

(3:1).  After  heating  the  plates  for  5mins,  five  coloured 

components were obtained with R

f

 values of 0.06, 0.12, 0.19, 



0.32  and  0.75.  Treatment  with  vanillin-Conc.H

2

SO



4

,  gave 


four  components  with  R

0.06,  0.12,  0.19  and  0.75  were 



obtained.  

 

2.4 Gas Chromatographic – Mass Spectroscopic (GC/MS) 

Analysis 

The  crude  n-hexane  extract  was  analyzed  using  GC–MS-

QP2010  system  (Shimadzu,  Kyoto,  Japan)  with  split  mode 

(1:0)  and  the  purge  flow  of  3  mL/min.  The  injector 

temperature  was  250  ˚C.  Helium  with  constant  flow  of  1.5 

mL/min  served  as  carrier  gas.  The  oven  was  programmed  at 

the following rates; the initial temperature of the column was 

80  ˚C  (2  min  hold)  followed  by  200  ˚C  (4min  hold)  and 

finally  at  280  ˚C  (5min  hold).  The  mass  spectrometer 

conditions  were  as  follows:  electron  impact  ionization  (EI); 

interface temperature, 250 ˚C; ion source temperature, 200 ˚C; 

the  detector  voltage,  1  kV;  solvent  delay,  1.5  min.  All  data 

were obtained by collecting the full-scan mass spectra within 

the scan range of m/z 30 – m/z 800 over 30min. 

 

2.5 Identification of Phytocompounds 

The  chemical  compositions  of  the  hexane  extract  of  S. 



guineense leaf were investigated using Gas Chromatography-

Mass Spectrometry while the mass spectra of the compounds 

found  in  the  extract  was  matched  with  the  National  Institute 

of Standards and Technology (NIST) library along with other 

libraries.  The  identity  of  the  components  in  the  extract  was 

assigned  by  comparing  their  retention  indices  and  mass 

spectra  fragmentation  patterns  with  those  stored  in  the 

computer  library.  Interpretation  of  Mass-Spectrum  was 

conducted  using  the  database  of  National  Institute  Standard 

and Technology (NIST) having 191, 436 general compounds 

and  the  Wiley  library  containing  310,  000  general 

compounds.  The  spectrum  of  the  unknown  was  compared 

with  the  spectrum  of  known  components  stored  in  the  NIST 

libraries  and  were  used  for  matching  the  identified 

components  from  the  plant  material.  The  name,  molecular 

weight and structure of the components of the tested samples 

were ascertained. 


 

~ 264 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

3. Results and Discussion 

The  extraction  using  n-hexane  yielded  1.4%  of  the  leaf 

extract. The TLC analysis showed four terpenes are present in 

the  extract  when  plates  were  treated  with  vanillin-

Conc.H


2

SO

4. 



But  after  heating  the  plates  for  5mins,  five 

coloured  components  were  obtained  with  R

f

  values  of  0.06, 



0.12,  0.19,  0.32  and  0.75.  The  R

f

  values  of  the  four 



components  are  0.06,  0.12,  0.19  and  0.75.  The  five  (5) 

compounds may likely be corresponding with the compounds 

1-ethyl-2-methylbenzene,  Ylangene,  decahydro-4a-methyl-1-

methylene-7-(1-methylethynyl)-naphthalene, 4-dimethyl-7-(1-

methylethenyl)azulene and caryophyllene oxide not necessary 

in  that  order,  thereby  asserting  the  relationship  between  the 

two chromatographic methods employed for the analysis.  

 The  studies  on  the  principles  in  the  leaf  of  Syzygium 



guineense hexane extract by TLC and GC-MS analysis clearly 

showed  the  presence  of  twelve  compounds.  The  compounds, 

their  structures,  class  and  concentration  are  presented  in 

Tables 1, 2 and 3.  



 

Table 1: Terpenes Identified in the leaf of Syzygium guineense 

 

No. 

Compounds 

Structure 

Molecular 

Weight 

Concentration (%) 

1-ethyl-2-methyl benzene 



C

9

H



12

 

 



120 

2.61 


Ylangene 

C

15

H



24

 

 



204 

2.42 


3. 

γ-muurolone 

C

15

H



24

 

 



204 

2.47 


4. 

Azulene 


C

15

H



24

 

 



204 

2.06 


5. 

Caryophyllene oxide 

C

15

H



24

 



220 

3.86 


 

Table 2: Hydrocarbons Identified in the Leaf of Syzygium guineense 

 

 



Compounds 

Molecular 

Weight 

Concentration 

(%) 

Tetratriacontane C



34

H

70



 

478 


6.70 

Pentatriacontane C



35

H

72



 

492 


3.95 

 

Table 3: Organic Acids and Fatty Acids Identified in the Leaf of 



Syzygium guineense 

 

 

Compound 



Molecula

r Weight 

Concentr

ation 

(%) 

Tetradecanoic acid 



(Myristic Acid) C

14

H



28

O

2



 

228 


2.11 

n-hexadecanoic acid 



(Palmitic acid) C

16

H



32

O

2



 

214 


11.94 

3. 


Trans-Octadec-9-enoic acid 

(Elaidic acid) C

18

H

34



O

2

 



282 

25.72 


4. 

1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid 

(Pthalic acid) C

24

H



38

O

4



 

390 


2.71 

 

The  compounds  identified  by  the  mass  spectroscopy  are 



presented.  While  the  major  components  in  n-hexane  extracts 

of Syzygium aromaticum identified using GC-MS are eugenol 

and  eugenol  acetate,  the  major  components  in  Syzygium 

guineense 

are 


9-octadecanoic 

acid 


(25.72%) 

and 


tetratriacontane  (31.45%).  The  three  major  phytochemical 

components in the n-hexane extracts are n-hexadecenoic acid 

(11.94%),  9-octadecanoic  acid  (25.72%)  and  tetratriacontane 

(31.45%). The other nine (9) components put together makes 

up  only  26.42%  and  these  are  1-ethyl-2-methylbenzene 

(2.61%), 

Ylangene 

(2.42%), 

decahydro-4a-methyl-1-

methylene-7-(1-methylethynyl)-naphthalene, 4-dimethyl-7-(1-

methylethenyl)azulene (2.06%), caryophyllene oxide(3.86%), 

myristic acid (2.11%), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (2.71%), 

tetratriacontane  (6.70%)  and  pentatriacontane  (3.95%).  This 

study  is  reporting  two  acids  present  in  the  leaf  of  syzygium 



guineense not reported in the literature reviewed. These acids 

are myristic acid and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid. 

According 

to 


Pubmed 

data 


base 

(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), 

azulene 

shows 


anti-

inflammatory  actions  as  well  as  analgesic,  antipyretic,  and 

platelet-inhibitory actions. It acts by blocking the synthesis of 

prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. One mechanism 

by  which  it  does  this  is  through  inhibition  of  prostaglandin 

synthesis and this account for their analgesic, antipyretic, and 

platelet-inhibitory actions. Myristic acid is active in 7 of 711 

bioassays, elaidic acid  in 2 of 11, palmitic acid is 21 in 381, 

pthalic  acid  active  in  3  of  645  bioassays.  Tetratriacontane  is 

inactive in 6 tested bioassays. The results of this study offer a 

basis of using S. guineense as an alternative medicinal agent. 


 

~ 265 ~ 


Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies 

 

4. Conclusion 

In  the  present  study  twelve  (12)  phytochemical  constituents 

have  been  identified  from  hexane  extract  of  Syzygium 



guineense  leaf  by  Thin  Layer  Chromatography  (TLC)  and 

Gas  Chromatogram  Mass  spectrometry  (GC-MS)  analysis. 

The  presence  of  the  various  compounds  particularly  the 

bioactive ones i.e. azulene, tetradecanoic acid (myristic acid), 

and  trans-octadec-9-enoic  acid  (elaidic  acid)  justifies  the  use 

of  the  leaf  against  various  ailments  by  traditional 

practitioners. 

 

5. Acknowledgement 

The immense contribution of  Prof. (Mrs.) E. A.  Adelakun  of 

Chemistry  Department,  University  of  Jos,  Jos-Nigeria  is 

hereby acknowledged. 



 

6. Competing Interest 

Authours have declared that no competing interests exist. 

 

7. References 

1.

 



Paul  JP,  Venkatesan  M,  Yesu  JR.  The  Antibacterial 

Activity  and  Phytochemicals  of  the  Leaves  of 

Stylosanthes  Fruticosa  Linn  Intl  Journ  of  Phytopharm 

Res. 2012; 3(4):96-106. 

2.

 

Bharathi  SV,  Nithya  TG,  Sivakumar  S,  Muruga  L. 



Screening  of  Bioactive  Compounds  and  Antimicrobial 

Effect  of  Orithazh  Thamarai  Chooranam  Int.  J.  Pharm 

Tech Res., 2012; 4(2):572-575. 

3.

 



A Call for Using Natural Compounds in the Development 

of 


New 

Antimalarial 

Treatments 

https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/  

4.

 



Riaz  T,  Muhammad  AA,  Aziz-Ur-R,  Tayyaba  S, 

Muhammad  A,  Khalid  MK.  Antioxidant  Activity  and 

Phenolic Content of D. Viscose J Serb. Chem. Soc. 2012; 

77(4):423-435. 

5.

 

Si-Yuan P, Shan P, Zhi-Ling Y, Dik-Lung M, Si-Bao C, 



Wang-Fun F et al. New Perspectives on Innovative Drug 

Discovery:  An  Overview  J  Pharm.  Sci  2010;  13(3):450-

471. 

6.

 



Adriano  M,  Marcello  L,  Azzurra  S,  Francesco  P. 

Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from 

Marine  Sponges  Containing  Dibrominated  Indolic 

Systems Molecules. 2012; 17(5):6083-6099. 

7.

 

Chhandak B, Zwenger S. Plant Terpenoids: Applications 



and  Future  Potentials  Biotechnology  and  Molecular 

Biology Reviews. 2008; 1(3):1-7.  

8.

 

Abdelaziz  L,  Alexander  IY,  Khlaifat  H,  Qutob  RA, 



Abramovich,  Yuri  YK.  Characteristics  of  the  GC-MS 

Mass  Spectra  of  Terpenoids  (C

10

H

16



)  Chem  Sciences 

Journ. 2010; 2010(CSJ-7):3-10. 

9.

 

Sartorelli  P,  João  HG  Lago,  Elisângela  DS,  Bruna  M, 



Renata  P,  Marcelo  AV,  Roberto  CC  Martins  et  al

Chemical  and  Biological  Evaluation  of  Essential  Oils 

from  Two  Species  of  Myrtaceae  —  Eugenia  uniflora  L. 

and Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg) Kausel Molecules 2011; 

16(12):9827-9837. 

10.


 

Cheewangkoon R, Groenewald JZ, Summerell BA, Hyde 

KD,  To-anun  K,  Crous  PW.  Myrtaceae,  A  Cache  of 

Fungal Biodiversity Persoonia 2009; 23:55-85.  

11.

 

Chalannavar RK, Venugopala KN, Himansu B, Bharti O. 



Chemical  composition  of  essential  oil  of  Psidium 

cattleianum  var.  lucidum  (Myrtaceae)  Afri  Jour  of 

Biotechn, 2012; 11(18):33, 8341-8347.  

12.

 

Tian  L,  Min  X,  Dong  W,  Hong-Tao  Z,  Chong-Ren  Y, 



Ying-Jun  Z.  Phenolic  Constituents  from  the  Leaves  of 

Syzygium  forrestii  Merr.  and  Perry  Biochemical 

Systematics and Ecology 2011; 39:156-158. 

13.

 

Cock  IE.  Antimicrobial  Activity  of  Syzygium  australe 



and  Syzygium  leuhmannii  Leaf  Methanolic  Extracts 

Pharmacog. Comm. 2012; 2(2):71-77.  

14.

 

Abhishek KS, Vinod KV. Syzygium cumini: An overview 



J Chem. Pharm. Res., 2011; 3(3):108-113. 

15.


 

Djipa CD, Delme´e M, Quetin-Leclercq J. Antimicrobial 

Activity of Bark Extracts of Syzygium jambos (L.) Alston 

(Myrtaceae) J Ethnopharmacol. 2011; 71(1-2):307-313. 

16.

 

Nassar MI, Ahmed HG, Ahmed HE, Abdel-Razik H, Hui 



S,  Enamul  H  et  al.  Chemical  constituents  of  clove 

(Syzygium 



aromaticum

Fam. 


Myrtaceae

Rev. 

Latinoamer. Quím. 2007; 35:3. 

17.


 

Muniappan  A,  Pandurangan  S.  Syzygium  cumini  (L.) 

Skeels: A  Review of Its Phytochemical  Constituents and 

Traditional  Uses.  Asian  Pacific  Journ  of  Tropical 

Biomed. 2012; 2(3):240-246. 

18.


 

Idu  M,  Erhabor  JO,  Harriet  ME.  Documentation  on 

Medicinal  Plants  Sold  in  Markets  in  Abeokuta,  Nigeria 

Trop J Pharm Res. 2010; 9(2):110.  

19.

 

Ior LD, Otimenyin SO, Umar M. Anti-Inflammatory and 



Analgesic  Activities of the Ethanolic Extract of the  Leaf 

of  Syzygium  Guineense  in  Rats  and  Mice  Journal  of 

Pharmacy. 2012; 2(4):33-36.  

20.


 

Omale  J,  Ebiloma  UG,  Ogohi  DA.  Anti-Venom  Studies 

on  Olax  Viridis  and  Syzygium  Guineense  Extracts. 

American  Journal  of  Pharmacology  and  Toxicology, 

2013; 8(1):1-8.  

21.


 

Abou-Mansour E, Djoukeng  JD, Tabacchi R, Tapondjou 

AL, Boudab H, Lontsi D. Antibacterial Triterpenes from 

Syzygium 

guineense 

(Myrtaceae) 

Journ 

of 


Ethnophαrmaco. 2005; 101(3):283-286. 

22.


 

Jean-Claude  C,  Jean-Pierre  N,  Paul  Y,  Dominique  CKS, 

Gilles  F.  Chemical  Composition  of  Essential  oil  of 

Syzygium  guineense  (Willd.)  DC.  var.  guineense 

(Myrtaceae)  from  Benin  Rec.  Nat.  Prod.  2008;  2(2):33-

38. 

23.


 

Nvau 


JB, 

Oladosu 


PO, 

Orishadipe 

AT. 

Antimycobacterial  Evaluation  of  Some  Medicinal  Plants 



Used  in  Plateau  State  of  Nigeria  for  the  Treatment  of 

Tuberculosis Agric. Biol. J N Am. 2011; 2(9):1270-1272 

24.

 

Ghildya P, Tom EG,  Anders  R, Mona  S, Bent R,  Drissa 



D  et  al.  Chemical  Composition  and  Immunological 

Activities  of  Polysaccharides  Isolated  from  the  Malian 

Medicinal  Plant  Syzygium  guineense  Journal  of 

Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy. 2010; 2(6):76-85. 

25.

 

McRae  JM,  Yang  Q,  Crawford  RJ,  Palombo  EA. 



Antibacterial  compounds  from  Plαnchoniα  cαreyα  leaf 

extracts. Journ of Ethnopharmaco. 2008; 116(3):554-560. 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə