Journal of Tropical Ecology



Yüklə 231.5 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü231.5 Kb.
  1   2   3

Journal of Tropical Ecology (2006) 22:371–384. Copyright © 2006 Cambridge University Press

doi:10.1017/S0266467406003282 Printed in the United Kingdom

Species–habitat associations in a Sri Lankan dipterocarp forest

C. V. S. Gunatilleke

, I. A. U. N. Gunatilleke



∗1

, S. Esufali

, K. E. Harms



†, P. M. S. Ashton‡,

D. F. R. P. Burslem

§ and P. S. Ashton#

Department of Botany, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka



† Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA and Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apdo. 2072, Balboa,

Republic of Panama

‡ School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511-2189, USA

§ School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK

# Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

(

Accepted November 2005)



Abstract: Forest structure and species distribution patterns were examined among eight topographically defined

habitats for the 205 species with stems

≥ 1 cm dbh inhabiting a 25-ha plot in the Sinharaja rain forest, Sri Lanka. The

habitats were steep spurs, less-steep spurs, steep gullies and less-steep gullies, all at either lower or upper elevations.

Mean stem density was significantly greater on the upper spurs than in the lower, less-steep gullies. Stem density

was also higher on spurs than in gullies within each elevation category and in each upper-elevation habitat than in

its corresponding lower-elevation habitat. Basal area varied less among habitats, but followed similar trends to stem

density. Species richness and Fisher’s alpha were lower in the upper-elevation habitats than in the lower-elevation

habitats. These differences appeared to be related to the abundances of the dominant species. Of the 125 species

subjected to torus-translation tests, 99 species (abundant and less abundant and those in different strata) showed at

least one positive or negative association to one or more of the habitats. Species associations were relatively more

frequent with the lower-elevation gullies. These and the previous findings on seedling ecophysiology, morphology

and anatomy of some of the habitat specialists suggest that edaphic and hydrological variation related to topography,

accompanied by canopy disturbances of varying intensity, type and extent along the catenal landscape, plays a major

role in habitat partitioning in this forest.

Key Words: Environmental heterogeneity, habitat specialization, rain forest, Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot, species-

habitat associations, Sri Lanka, torus translations



INTRODUCTION

Both niche partitioning and dispersal-assembly processes

have been invoked to explain species co-existence and

controls on plant distribution in species-rich tropical tree

communities (Hubbell 2001, Potts et al. 2004, Whitfield

2002, Wright 2002). A role for niche partitioning is

suggested by associations between plant distributions and

environmental conditions at a variety of spatial scales in

both the New and Old World Tropics (Baillie et al. 1987,

Debski et al. 2002, Fine et al. 2005, Gartlan et al. 1986,

Gimaret-Carpentier et al. 1998, 2003; Harms et al.

2001, Itoh et al. 2003, Phillips et al. 2003, Potts et al.

2002). The dispersal-assembly perspective proposes that

1

Corresponding author: I. A. U. N. Gunatilleke, Department of Botany,



Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400,

Sri Lanka. Email: savnim@slt.lk, savnimg@yahoo.com

communities are non-equilibrium assemblages of species

brought together by accidents of dispersal, and that

localized niche partitioning plays a limited role in species

coexistence. The importance of seed-dispersal limitation

for determining the distribution of species at small scales

has been demonstrated in recent research in tropical

forests (Dalling et al. 2002, Hubbell et al. 1999, Webb &

Peart 2001). However, the relative importance of the two

sets of mechanisms in controlling structure of tropical

rain-forest communities that are rich in closely related

species is poorly understood. This results in part because,

in most cases, the potentially subtle differences in life-

history characteristics among species with contrasting

habitat associations have not been examined.

Central to understanding the distribution patterns of

plant species is the identification of habitats at scales

that are relevant to plant populations. The limitations

of small plots in differentiating local habitats have led to



372

C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE ET AL.

the establishment of large plots (16–52 ha) in tropical

forests where all individuals

≥ 1 cm diameter at breast

height (dbh) have been mapped, measured and identified

to species (Condit 1995, Condit et al. 1996, Harms et al.

2001, Losos & Leigh 2004, Manokaran et al. 1992,

Sukumar et al. 1992, Valencia et al. 2004). Such data

sets now provide opportunities to test species-habitat

relationships as one step towards understanding the

factors that determine species-distribution patterns.

The 25-ha Forest Dynamics Plot (FDP) at Sinharaja,

south-west Sri Lanka, is among the most topographically

heterogeneous FDPs co-ordinated within the network

of the Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS), and

has the highest elevational range (151 m) of the CTFS

plots (comparative data for the various CTFS plots are

available on the CTFS website: http://www.ctfs.si.edu).

While supporting a very large number of stems per

unit area relative to the other large plots, the Sinharaja

FDP also has several series of closely related congeneric,

sympatric species (Ashton et al. 2004, Gunatilleke et al.

2004). The majority of these are endemic to Sri Lanka.

Understanding the presence or absence of habitat pre-

ferences, especially among these congeneric species could

shed some light on the means by which they coexist.

Species-habitat associations have now been described

for FDPs in a semi-deciduous forest on Barro Colorado

Island in Panama (Harms et al. 2001), lowland evergreen

forests at Yasuni in Ecuador (Valencia et al. 2004)

and Lambir in Sarawak (Davies et al. 2005). At

Sinharaja, unlike the other three sites, our interpretation

of differences in species distribution was facilitated by

a substantial body of experimental research that has

investigated the mechanistic basis of species-habitat

associations among closely-related and sympatric species

within the important tree genera ShoreaMesua and



Syzygium (Ashton 1995, Ashton & Berlyn 1992, Ashton

et al. 1995, 2001, 2006, Burslem et al. 2001, Gamage

et al. 2003, Gunatilleke et al. 1997, Singhakumara et al.

2003). The combination of habitat associations plus

species traits and performance characteristics provides

a powerful opportunity to address the challenge of

determining the extent to which differences in species

responses to resource availability contribute to their co-

existence in species-rich tropical forests (Hubbell 2001).

The Sinharaja FDP was divided into eight habitats based

on elevation, convexity and slope to address the following

questions: (1) Do stem density, basal area, species richness

and representation by different growth forms vary among

habitats? (2) What proportion of species is significantly as-

sociated with one or more of these habitats? (3) Are more

species associated with some habitats than with others?

(4) Are more-abundant species differentially associated

with habitats compared with less-abundant species?

(5) Do species of different growth forms, i.e. structural

guilds, differentially associate with these habitats? (6) Are

significant associations, especially differences among

congeneric species, consistent with the available exper-

imental evidence for their ecophysiological differences?

METHODS

Study area

The area studied is the Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot

(FDP), a 500

× 500-m (25-ha) permanent study plot

(Figure 1). The Sinharaja FDP is located in the lowland

rain forest of the Sinharaja UNESCO World Heritage

Site at the centre of the ever-wet south-western region

of Sri Lanka (6

21–26 N, 80



21–34 E). The forest has

been classified as a MesuaDoona community (de Rosayro

1942), and on a regional scale it represents a mixed

dipterocarp forest (Ashton 1964, Whitmore 1984).

Topographically,

the

Sinharaja



FDP

spans


the

elevational range of 424 m to 575 m asl. The Sinharaja

FDP includes a valley lying between two slopes, a steeper

higher slope facing south-west and a less-steep slope

facing north-east (Figure 1). Seepage ways, spurs, small

hillocks, at least two perennial streams and several

seasonal streamlets cut across these slopes. The floristics

and forest structure within the plot as a whole have

been documented in Gunatilleke et al. (2004). The

Sinharaja FDP is representative of the ‘ridge-steep slope-

valley’ landscape of the lowland through mid-elevational

rain forests of south-western Sri Lanka. This landform

is a result of differential weathering and erosion of

lithologically less-resistant Precambrian metamorphic

bedrock along structurally controlled parallel strike ridges

and valleys (Cooray 1984, Erb 1984).



Vegetation sampling

To establish the Sinharaja FDP, we followed the

methodology established by Hubbell & Foster (1983) and

Manokaran et al. (1992), to maintain census uniformity

with similar plots within the CTFS network. The Sinharaja

FDP was established in 1993, when it was demarcated

on the horizontal plane into 625 quadrats of 20

× 20 m


(400 m

2

) each. The trees in the plot were censused over



the period 1994–1996, when the diameters of all free-

standing stems

≥ 1 cm dbh were measured. Each stem

was mapped and identified to species, using the National

Herbarium of Sri Lanka, and Dassanayake & Fosberg

(1980–2000).



Topographic parameters and habitat categorization

Habitats of the Sinharaja FDP were identified by three

physical parameters, viz. elevation, slope and convexity,

in each of the 20

× 20-m quadrats. The mean of the


Species–habitat associations in Sinharaja forest

373


Figure 1. Topography of the 25-ha forest dynamics plot (all scales in metres) in Sinharaja, Sri Lanka.

elevations at the four corners of each quadrat gave the

quadrat’s elevation. Each quadrat was divided into four

triangular planes, each formed by joining three corners

of the quadrat. The average angular deviation of these

planes from horizontal provided the slope (Harms et al.

2001). Convexity was calculated as in Yamakura et al.

(1995), i.e. as a quadrat’s mean elevation relative to

the mean elevations of its eight immediate neighbouring

quadrats (the focal quadrat mean elevation minus the

mean elevation of the neighbouring quadrats). For each of

the perimeter quadrats of the plot, for which the number of

neighbouring quadrats was

<8,convexitywascalculated

as the elevation of the centre point of the focal quadrat

minus the mean elevation of its four corners. Positive

values indicate convex surfaces, whereas negative values

indicate concave surfaces.

Bivariate scatterplots for each pair of topographic

variables confirmed that they were independent of each

other, with r

2

values ranging between 0.0356 and 0.141.



These three variables represent mutually orthogonal

topographic properties, so we used all three to define

eight topographic habitats. Each 20

× 20-m quadrat was

assigned to one of two categories of elevation (upper

vs. lower, divided by the median elevation value for the

FDP), slope (steep vs. less-steep divided by the median

slope value), and convexity (Table 1, Figure 2a).The

abbreviations of the habitat categories used in the entire

paper are explained in Table 1.



Table 1. The physical parameters used to define habitat categories of each 20

× 20-m quadrat of the Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot.

Habitat category

Elevation (m)

Slope (



)



Convexity

Number (and %) of quadrats

Total area on plot (ha)

Upper-elevation steep spurs (USS)

> 460

> 25


> 0

104 (17)


4.2

Upper-elevation steep gullies (USG)

> 460

> 25


≤ 0

68 (11)


2.7

Upper-elevation less-steep spurs (ULS)

> 460

≤ 25


> 0

108 (17)


4.3

Upper-elevation less-steep gullies (ULG)

> 460

≤ 25


≤ 0

32 (05)


1.3

Low-elevation steep spurs (LSS)



< 460

> 25


> 0

52 (08)


2.1

Low-elevation steep gullies (LSG)



< 460

> 25


≤ 0

59 (09)


2.4

Low-elevation less-steep spurs (LLS)



< 460

≤ 25


> 0

48 (08)


1.9

Low-elevation less-steep gullies (LLG)



< 460

≤ 25


≤ 0

155 (25)


6.2

374

C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE ET AL.



Figure 2. Habitats and selected species distribution patterns within the 25-ha forest dynamics plot in Sinharaja, Sri Lanka. (a) Habitats based on

elevation, slope and convexity, each at two levels. Distribution patterns of (b) Mesua nagassarium (blue) found predominantly on upper-elevation

steep spurs and Mesua ferrea (red) found predominantly on upper steep and less-steep gullies. Distribution patterns of (c) Shorea worthingtonii

(black) found predominantly on upper steep spurs, Shorea trapezifolia (blue) found predominantly on the low-elevation less-steep spurs, and Shorea



megistophylla (red) found predominantly on the low-elevation less-steep gullies.

Structural and floristic characteristics among habitats

To assess the structural characteristics of the vegetation

in the different habitats, the means of density and

basal area per quadrat in each habitat were compared.

Similarly, species richness and Fisher’s alpha diversity per

quadrat were calculated and compared among habitats.

Significant differences in species richness and Fisher’s

alpha diversity among habitats were determined using

torus-translation tests, described below.


Species–habitat associations in Sinharaja forest

375


Table 2. Mean and standard error for structural (density and basal area) and floristic (species richness and Fisher’s alpha diversity) characteristics

per quadrat among habitats in the Sinharaja 25-ha Forest Dynamics Plot. Total number of free-standing species identified in the plot was 205.

Significance among the respective values column-wise was tested using two-tailed torus-translation tests, P

< 0.025 for either tail. An asterisk (

)



indicates a significant departure from the null expectation. Abbreviations of habitat categories are explained in Table 1.

Habitat categories

Area (ha)

Mean no. of individuals

Mean basal area (m

2

)



Mean no. of species

Mean Fisher’s alpha

Upper-elevation habitats

USS


4.2

409


± 11

2.36



± 0.08

46.7


± 0.8

14.6


± 0.4

ULS



2.7

402


± 13

2.26



± 0.10

47.9


± 1.2

15.1


± 0.6

USG


4.3

322


± 10

1.90


± 0.07

47.0


± 0.7

15.5


± 0.4

ULG


1.3

357


± 18

1.81


± 0.11

51.7


± 1.9

17.2


± 0.8

Low-elevation habitats

LSS

2.1


368

± 14


2.05

± 0.09


56.9

± 1.7


20.4

± 0.9


LLS

2.4


352

± 18


1.88

± 0.09


54.0

± 1.5


19.7

± 0.8


LSG

1.9


322

± 17


1.51

± 0.07


53.4

± 1.3


19.4

± 0.8


LLG

6.2


220

± 6


1.22


± 0.04

49.6


± 0.8

21.1


± 0.4



Significant associations of species with habitats

Positive and negative associations of species with habitats

were determined by torus-translation tests (Harms et al.

2001). The tests assess the similarity between the spatial

structure of each focal species population and each

habitat. For each species, the observed relative densities of

stems in each of the habitats were compared with expected

relative densities. To obtain the expected values, the true

habitat map was shifted about a two-dimensional torus

by 20-m increments to exhaustively produce all possible

20-m translations of the true habitat map in the four

cardinal directions. Each of the 625 maps provided an

estimate of the expected relative density.

A species was significantly positively associated with a

particular habitat if its relative density in the true habitat

map was

> 97.5% of the values obtained from translated



maps. A significant negative association occurred if the

relative density in the true map was



< 97.5% of the values

from translated maps. In the Sinharaja FDP, 205 tree

species with stems

≥ 1 cm dbh and 10 species of liana

have been identified. For the torus-translation tests, we

used the 125 tree species with a density

≥ 100 individuals

in the 25-ha plot.

We also used torus-translations to test whether species

richness, Fisher’s alpha diversity, stem density and basal

area differed among habitats. In each case, the observed

value for a given habitat was compared with a frequency

distribution of expected values generated by an exhaust-

ive set of 20-m incremental torus-translations (analogous

to the procedure used to assess species associations).

RESULTS

Spatial distribution of habitats

The most extensive habitat was the LLG (6.2 ha), whereas

the least extensive and most fragmented was the ULG

(1.3 ha; Table 1, Figure 2a). The remaining habitats

ranged from 1.9 to 4.3 ha in extent. USS and ULS were

greater in extent (4.2–4.3 ha) than the USG and ULG (1.3–

2.7 ha). The extent of the LLG was similar to that of the

three remaining low-elevation habitats combined.



Structural and floristic differences among habitats

The LLG had the lowest density of individuals

≥ 1 cm

dbh, whereas the USS and ULS had the highest densities



(

> 400 individuals per quadrat, Table 2); in these cases

the densities depart significantly from expectations. The

densities of the remaining habitats had values between

these extremes. Spurs at both elevations, irrespective of

whether they were steep or less steep, had significantly

higher densities compared with gullies at the same

elevation.

Mean basal area among habitats ranged from 1.22 m

2

in the LLG to 2.36 m



2

in the USS, although no mean

value differed significantly from expectations (Table 2).

The basal area of the tree community on spurs was higher

than that in gullies at each of the two elevations, as with

stem density. The value for each upper-elevation habitat

was greater than that of the corresponding habitat at

lower elevation.

Species richness per quadrat showed little variation

among habitats and ranged from 46.7 in the USS to

a high of 56.9 in the LSS (Table 2). Species diversity

per quadrat (measured using Fisher’s alpha) among the

habitats ranged from 14.6 to 21.1 (Table 2). In the upper-

elevation habitats, where the diversity was at the lower

end of the range, spurs showed lower values than gullies.

The diversity values of the low-elevation habitats were

more or less similar, but among them the LLG had the

highest diversity. Diversity was significantly higher in LLG

than in USS. The differences among all other values were

not statistically significant.



Species–habitat associations using torus-translation tests

Based on torus-translation tests, a total of 175 significant

associations (94 positive and 81 negative) were observed


376

C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE ET AL.



Table 3. Numbers of positive and negative associations observed among the different habitats defined by topographic parameters in the Sinharaja

Forest Dynamics Plot, based on two-tailed torus-translation tests, P



< 0.025 for either tail. Abbreviations of habitat categories are explained in

Table 1.


Habitat category

Total no. of significant associations

No. of positive associations

in each habitat

No. of negative associations

in each habitat

Upper-elevation habitats

USS


24

3

21



ULS

25

7



18

USG


12

5

7



ULG

5

3



2

Totals in upper-elevation habitats

66

18

48



Low-elevation habitats

LSS


6

5

1



LLS

13

11



2

LSG


24

13

11



LLG

66

47



19

Totals in low-elevation habitats

109

76

33



Total nos. and (%) of significant

175


94 (54%)

81 (46%)


associations in all categories

(Table 3). LLG produced the highest number of significant

associations. There were 66 significant associations

among the four upper-elevation habitats, of which 18

were positive and 48 were negative. The corresponding

values in the four low-elevation habitats totalled 109,

with 76 positive and 33 negative (Table 3). In the

upper-elevation habitats, spurs had more significant asso-

ciations (mostly negative) than gullies, but in the lower-

elevation habitats the pattern was reversed and the gullies

had more associations (mostly positive) than spurs.

  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə