Journal of Tropical Ecology



Yüklə 231.5 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/3
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü231.5 Kb.
1   2   3

Species associated with habitats

Of the 125 species with densities

≥ 100 individuals on

the plot, 99 species (79%) were positively or negatively

associated with one or more of the different habitats, i.e.

they were disproportionately over- or under-represented

in some habitats (Appendix 1). The remaining 26

species were not significantly associated with any of

the eight habitats and were distributed as expected by

chance with respect to these habitats. The five most

abundant among these species were Myristica dactyloides,

Diospyros acuminataMangifera zeylanicaShorea stipularis

and Chaetocarpus coriaceus with 2694, 1569, 1231, 984

and 861 individuals on the 25-ha plot, respectively. The

remaining 19 species each had abundances ranging from

106 to 706 individuals in the plot.

Among the 99 species significantly associated with

habitats, 16 were positively associated with one or

more of the upper-elevation habitats and 12 of these

16 were also negatively associated with either one or

both lower-elevation gullies (Appendix 1). The number

of species that was positively associated with the lower-

elevation habitats was 65; 28 of them were also

negatively associated with one or two of the upper-

elevation habitats (Appendix 1). Species that were

positively associated with one habitat type and negatively

associated with a contrasting habitat are exemplified

by the USS-associated species Mesua nagassarium,

Shorea worthingtoniiAgrostistachys intramarginalis and

the ULS-associated species Humboldtia laurifolia and



Memecylon arnottianum. Examples of species significantly

positively associated with a lower-elevation habitat

and significantly negatively associated with the upper-

elevation steep slope habitat include Bhesa ceylanica,



Palaquium canaliculatum and Urophyllum ellipticum.

Among the 18 species that showed only negative

associations, 11 including Shorea distichaShorea affinis

and Shorea congestiflora were biased against the lower-

elevation habitats and seven, including Anisophyllea

cinnamomoides and Cullenia ceylanica, were biased against

the upper-elevation habitats (Appendix 1).



Distribution patterns of abundant and less-abundant species

Species with

> 800 individuals representing the quartile

of most abundant species within the Sinharaja FDP were

considered abundant; less-abundant species had 100–

800 individuals (Table 4; Appendix 1). The percentage of

species positively and negatively associated with habitats

hardly differed between abundant and less-abundant

species (Table 4). Among the 33 positively associated

abundant species, 10 (including Mesua nagassarium,



Palaquium petiolare, Hydnocarpus octandra) were positively

associated with one or two of the upper-elevation habitats,

while the other 23 (including Palaquium canaliculatum

and Urophyllum ellipticum) were positively associated with

one or two of the lower-elevation habitats (Table 4,

Appendix 1). Among the 48 positively associated less-

abundant species, the corresponding values were 6 and


Species–habitat associations in Sinharaja forest

377


Table 4. Proportions of positively and negatively associated abundant (

> 800 individuals) and less abundant (100–800 individuals) species among

habitats, defined by topographic parameters in the Sinharaja Forest Dynamics Plot, based on two-tailed torus-translation tests, P

< 0.025 for either

tail. The number of significantly associated species in each abundance class is indicated within parentheses and these were used to calculate the

percentages shown in the last row (for details refer to Appendix 1). Abbreviations of habitat categories are explained in Table 1.

No. of species positively associated

with each habitat

No. of species negatively associated

with each habitat

Habitat category

Abundant spp.

(41)


Less-abundant spp. (58)

Abundant spp.

(41)

Less-abundant spp.



(58)

Upper-elevation habitats

USS

3

0



6

15

ULS



2

5

6



12

USG


4

1

0



7

ULG


3

0

0



2

Subtotals

10

6

10



26

Low-elevation habitats

LSS

3

2



0

1

LLS



4

7

1



1

LSG


5

8

5



6

LLG


18

29

13



6

Subtotals

23

42

13



10

Total no. and (%) of significantly

33 (80%)

48 (83%)


23 (56%)

36 (62%)


associated species in each category

42, respectively. Some species in these habitats were also

negatively associated with one of the remaining habitats,

indicating that they were significantly underrepresented

in them. A total of 18 species, eight abundant and 10 less-

abundant, were only negatively associated with certain

habitats; they failed to show any positive associations.

Among these negatively associated species, seven were

biased against upper-elevation habitats and eleven were

biased against lower-elevation habitats (Appendix 1).

Twenty-four species out of the total of 99 were positively

associated with spurs (Appendix 1). Among them, 10

species (five abundant and five less-abundant species)

were positively associated with upper-elevation spurs

and 14 were positively associated with lower-elevation

spurs (five abundant and nine less-abundant species).

Only five abundant and one less-abundant species were

positively associated with the upper-elevation gullies.

In contrast, 19 abundant and 33 less-abundant species

were positively associated with the lower-elevation gullies

(Appendix 1).

Habitat associations of species in different life-forms

The 125 species tested represented 19 canopy, 34

subcanopy, 30 understorey tree and 42 treelet and

shrub species (Table 5; Appendix 1). Among the canopy,

subcanopy and treelet and shrub species tested, 84–86%

were significantly associated with the different habitats

in the 25-ha plot; among the understorey tree species,

60% were significantly associated. The proportions of

significant species with respect to both the abundant and

less-abundant species in these growth forms also followed

a similar trend.

Table 5. Proportions of significantly associated species in each growth

form among the abundant (

> 800 individuals) and less abundant (100–

800 individuals) species, based on two-tailed torus-translation tests,

P

< 0.025 for either tail.

Abundance/growth

categories

No. tested

Number

significant



% significant in

each growth form

Abundant species

Canopy species

13

11

85



Subcanopy species

14

12



86

Understorey tree

species

8

5



63

Shrub/treelet species

13

13

100



All growth forms

48

41



85

Less-abundant species

Canopy species

6

5



83

Subcanopy species

20

17

85



Understorey tree

species


22

13

59



Shrub/treelet species

29

23



79

All growth forms

77

58

75



All species

Canopy species

19

16

84



Subcanopy species

34

29



85

Understorey tree

species

30

18



60

Shrub/treelet species

42

36

86



All growth forms

125


99

79

DISCUSSION



Forest structure and habitat associations at Sinharaja

The structural and floristic characteristics of the Sinharaja

FDP appear to reflect the different micro-environmental

conditions prevailing within its elevational range of



378

C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE ET AL.

151 m. For the three most abundant species (a

canopy tree, Mesua nagassarium, a treelet, Agrostistachys



intramarginalis, and an understorey tree, Humboldtia

laurifolia) in the upper-elevation spurs, their exceptionally

high densities (14 880, 18 022 and 22 459 individuals in

25 ha) indicate their differential success in that habitat.

Soils are shallower there and more prone to desiccation.

These sites may experience lower availability of irradiance

at ground level, moisture and nutrients (Ashton 1995,

Ashton & Berlyn 1992, Ashton et al. 1995, Burslem et al.

2001). Data from aerial photographic interpretations

(unpublished) revealed that canopy crown densities

increase and canopy crown size and canopy porosity

decrease from valley to ridge, presumably driven by the

hydrology of the site. These observations also suggest

that the forest canopy is more compact and uniform on

the ridges than in the valley. An experimental study

with seedlings of Mesua nagassarium that were grown

in artificial shelters for 2 y demonstrated their ability to

endure deep shade and low soil water availability (Ashton

et al. 2006).

In the lower-elevation habitats, on the other hand, soils

are wetter and light measurements have shown higher

mean and variance of irradiance (Ashton & Berlyn 1992).

In valleys, larger canopy gaps are found than on ridges

because there is a stronger tendency for trees to die in

groups (I. A. U. N. Gunatilleke et al. pers. obs.). Larger and

more frequent openings in the moist valley sites, especially

along streams of the lower elevations, support a greater

cover of herbaceous species of StrobilanthesColeus and



Ochlandra (not tallied in the 25-ha plot) sometimes at the

expense of woody plants (similar to a pattern observed by

Harms et al. 2004 for four Neotropical sites). In time, these

gaps in different stages of closure provide greater light

heterogeneity than those in upper slopes. These lower-

elevation gaps support a larger suite of species, adapted

to different light intensities, each with lower abundances.

The three most abundant species in the lower-elevation

habitats are all treelet/shrub species (Psychotria nigra,

Urophyllum ellipticum and Schumacheria castaneifolia) each

of whose population densities are much lower (6087,

4102 and 3550 individuals, respectively, in 25 ha) than

those of the most abundant species in the upper-elevation

habitats. Similar patterns of forest structure with lower

mean tree density and basal area in valleys compared to

mid-slope and upper-ridge sites have been observed in the

topographically heterogeneous FDP at Yasuni, Ecuador

(Valencia et al. 2004) and in Brunei (Ashton 1964).

In the south-western Sri Lankan landscape, forest trees

on ridge tops and rocky upper slopes are susceptible to

water shortage, particularly during El Ni ˜

no years, and also

to lightning strikes (Ashton et al. 2001). The gaps created

by these events are often small as the trees die standing

and create only small canopy disturbances. Consequently,

these habitats also appear to have relatively lower rates

of soil disturbance by tip-up mound formation during

tree-fall. Furthermore, on these thin soils interspersed

with rocky outcrops, the availability of nutrients for tree

growth is also limited. These conditions may lead to

habitat specialization and canopy dominance by shade-

tolerant and slow-growing species that are adapted to

regenerate preferentially in smaller gaps (e.g. Shorea



worthingtonii) and to lower species richness. Mid-slopes

on the other hand, are prone to small-scale earth slips

and landslides, and the lower slopes with a higher water

table have trees with shallow rooting systems. Both

of these processes result in multiple tree falls. Wind-

throws from sudden downdrafts are also channelled into

valleys, and cause relatively greater disturbance both

above- and below-ground (Ashton et al. 2001). Fast-

growing species with a high shoot:root ratio (e.g. Shorea

megistophylla) establish more successfully in these lower-

elevation habitats than in upper slopes and ridge tops, and

exhibit both habitat specialization and canopy dominance

(Ashton et al. 1995). The relatively larger gaps with

greater soil disturbance, higher soil nutrient availability,

and larger and more frequent canopy openings at

lower elevations may result in higher species diversity,

and select for abundant species that are mostly shade-

intolerant. As a result of the relatively greater extent of

canopy and soil disturbance on mid-slopes and valleys,

greater opportunities are made available for resource

partitioning among species present in the seedling bank.

Thus, in the Sinharaja landscape, while topographic and

edaphic habitat partitioning appear to play a significant

role in the spatial distribution of species, intermediate

disturbance conditions may contribute to higher species

diversity at lower elevations than in the more stable

conditions prevailing at upper elevations (cf. Connell

1978). A greater tree species diversity in low-elevation

valley plots than nearby ridge-top plots has also been

observed in lowland dipterocarp forests in Sumatra

(Rennolls & Laumonier 2000) and Sabah (Nilus 2003).

The mechanisms that determine these consistent patterns

of tree diversity across topographic gradients have not

been fully explored.

Comparisons with other forest dynamics plots

This study shows that nearly four-fifths (79%) of

species examined are associated with topographically

defined habitats in the Sinharaja FDP. Among the plots

examined using comparable methods, Sinharaja stands

among those with the highest percentage of species

demonstrating significant habitat associations: the plot

on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, has 33% of its

species significantly associated with habitats, those at

Mudumalai in India and Korup in Cameroon have

68% each (Anon. 2003, Harms et al. 2001), but


Species–habitat associations in Sinharaja forest

379


that at Lambir in Sarawak – also a topographically

heterogeneous plot – has 86.8% of species significantly

biased with respect to the habitat gradient of the plot

(Davies et al. 2005). This study may have underestimated

the total percentage of habitat specialists at Sinharaja,

however, by arbitrarily confining the analysis only to

an elevational and topographic gradient. There are, for

instance, aspect-related patterns of species distribution

within the plot: for example, Shorea trapezifolia and

Syzygium rubicundum are concentrated on the north-

east facing slope, while Shorea megistophyllaS. disticha,



S. cordifolia and S. worthingtonii are concentrated on

the south-west facing slope. These two associations are

widespread in the Sinharaja landscape and appear to be

correlated with soil depth and possibly occasional large-

scale canopy openings (Ashton et al. 2001, Gamage et al.

2003). Using an index of relative neighbourhood density

(a probability density function), Condit et al. (2000)

observed that in both the Sinharaja and Lambir FDPs,

the species distribution patterns followed topographic

features resulting in habitat-related patchiness more than

in the two more topographically homogeneous Forest

Dynamics Plots at BCI and Pasoh. The eight habitat

classification appears to have successfully represented

much of the topographic variability of the Sinharaja

FDP.

Mechanistic basis of habitat specialization

The strong relationships between species distributions

and habitats are consistent with ecophysiological,

morphological and anatomical studies carried out with

seedlings of Shorea, Mesua, Dipterocarpus and Syzygium

species in natural canopy gaps along topographic catenas

and in artificial shelters, each over a period of 2 y (Ashton

1995, Ashton & Berlyn 1992, Ashton et al. 1995, 2001,

2006, Gamage et al. 2003, Gunatilleke et al. 1997,

Singhakumara et al. 2003). For example, seedlings of



Shorea worthingtonii and Mesua nagassarium are more

tolerant of shade and drought than their sympatric

congeners and these characteristics might explain their

strong positive associations with upper-elevation spurs.

These species possess relatively small leaves, low leaf

surface to volume ratios, low stomatal densities per unit

area and low rates of stomatal conductance (Ashton &

Berlyn 1992, Ashton et al. 2006). Compared to the other



Shorea species, seedlings of S. worthingtonii exhibit the

least plasticity in leaf anatomy between shade and sun,

higher root allocation and rates of net photosynthesis,

and lower mortality in deep shade (Ashton 1995). Shorea



worthingtonii and M. nagassarium showed higher survival

and growth in both natural and simulated upper-slope

environments, and S. worthingtonii experienced the lowest

survival and growth rates in open valley habitats in the

Sinharaja landscape (Ashton et al. 1995, 2006).

Compared to the other species of Shorea, seedlings

of S. megistophylla exhibited the greatest plasticity in

growth measures and leaf morphology between shade

and sun treatments and the greatest net photosynthetic

rates and stomatal conductivity, largest and thickest

leaves, largest stomates, thickest cuticles and greatest

rates of mass gain in full-sun environments (Ashton

1995, Ashton & Berlyn 1992). Taken together these traits

provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation

that seedlings of S. megistophylla show greatest rates of

growth and survival in large canopy gaps in valleys

(Ashton et al. 1995) and the positive association of stems

≥ 1 cm dbh to LLG (the habitat most clearly describing the

valley environment at Sinharaja). Mesua ferrea, a species

restricted to lower-lying areas along streams, exhibited

similar growth attributes to S. megistophylla (Ashton et al.

2006). Differential patterns of water-use efficiency and

shade tolerance among four sympatric species of Syzygium

also reflect differences in their habitat preferences in the

Sinharaja landscape (Gamage et al. 2003, Singhakumara

et al. 2003). Similar experimental investigation of the

mechanisms underlying habitat specialization in lowland

dipterocarp forest at Lambir National Park, Sarawak,

has emphasized the potential importance of differences

in water availability between soil types (Palmiotto et al.

2004).


Niche-assembly vs. dispersal-assembly mechanisms

underlying species distribution

The results from Sinharaja and other CTFS FDPs indicate

that with increases in fine-scale topographic and edaphic

heterogeneity, there may be a concomitant increase in

the proportion of habitat specialists (Harms et al. 2001,

Potts et al. 2004). At Sinharaja, habitat specialists are

dispersed by gyration (dipterocarps), ballistic mechanisms

(Agrostistachys) and large and small animals (most species

in Appendix 1; Jayasekara et al. 2003). Consequently,

this suggests that the role of dispersal agents is relatively

less important than that of habitat features in spatial

patterning of tree species in the Sinharaja landscape.

Phillips et al. (2003) have shown a similarly high degree

of association to contrasting substrates among forest trees

in Madre de Dios, south-eastern Peru and concluded

that substrate-mediated local processes may play a much

more important role than distance-dependent processes

in structuring forest composition. Likewise, Potts et al.

(2004) have shown that habitat heterogeneity and niche

structure play a more important role than dispersal-based

mechanisms in explaining observed species distribution

patterns in a NW Borneo mixed dipterocarp forest. A

larger-scale study in the Western Amazon by Fine et al.


380

C. V. S. GUNATILLEKE ET AL.

(2005) has shown that edaphic heterogeneity has played

an important role in both allopatric and parapatric

speciation of taxa within tribe Protieae of Burseraceae.

However, in a FDP in terre firme forest at Yasuni in

Ecuador, most species occurred in all habitats with similar

densities from ridge top to valley bottom, suggesting that

they might be habitat generalists (Valencia et al. 2004).

Valencia et al. (2004) found little evidence for fine-grained

partitioning of the topographic gradient, in contrast to the

observed patterns at Sinharaja. Furthermore, Valencia



et al. (2004) found that habitat specialists were mostly

treelets and shrubs, whereas in Sinharaja all growth

forms, including most of the abundant and canopy-

dominant species are well represented among habitat

specialists (Table 5, Appendix 1). These marked dif-

ferences observed in the patterns of species distribution

among forests may relate to their differences in historical

and ecological biogeography, or to differences in local

topography that create conditions that differentially

dictate species distribution patterns (Ashton 1998,

Burslem et al. 2001, Fine et al. 2005, Gamage et al. 2003,

Phillips et al. 2003, Potts et al. 2004).

Finally, the neutral theory of community organization

postulates that populations take random walks in

abundance as they disperse, colonize, advance and

retreat across landscapes (Hubbell 2001). The theory

was conceived and has been explored on homogeneous

landscapes (Hubbell 2001), even though real-world

landscapes are heterogeneous (e.g. Figure 1). The extent

that species distribution patterns are biased with respect

to landscape features is the extent to which predictions

made by neutral theory are not met. The present study

demonstrates dramatic levels of habitat association that

are inconsistent with a strict interpretation of neutrality

as applied to tropical forest tree communities.

1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə