Lessons learned technical series



Yüklə 0.59 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/7
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.59 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

 

24

BIODIvERSITy

 

COnSERvATIOn



 

LESSONS LEARNED 

TECHNICAL SERIES

Building community support to search for the 



Red-thRoated LoRikeet in Fiji

 

 


Building community support to search for the 

Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji 

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION 

LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES



24

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series is published by:

Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and Conservation International Pacific Islands Program 

(CI-Pacific)

PO Box 2035, Apia, Samoa 

T: + 685 21593  

E: 

cipacific@conservation.org



W: 

www.conservation.org



The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of l’Agence Française de Développement, 

Conservation International, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur 

Foundation and the World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil society is engaged in 

biodiversity conservation.

Conservation International Pacific Islands Program. 2013. Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned 

Technical Series 24: Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji 

Conservation International, Apia, Samoa

Author: Dick Watling, Fiji Nature Conservation Trust, 

watling@naturefiji.org

Design/Production: Joanne Aitken, The Little Design Company, 

www.thelittledesigncompany.com

Cover Image: Trichoglossus aureocinctus; Charmosyna aureicincta. Artist: John Gerrard Keulemans 

(1842–1912). Source: Ornithological Miscellany. Volume 1, via WIkimedia Commons.

Series Editor: Leilani Duffy, Conservation International Pacific Islands Program

Conservation International is a private, non-profit organization exempt from federal income tax under 

section 501c(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

OUR MISSION

Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, Conservation 

International empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature for the well-being of 

humanity.

ISBN 978-982-9130-24-2

© 2013 Conservation International

All rights reserved.

This publication is available electronically from Conservation International’s website:  

www.conservation.org 

or 

www.cepf.net



The 

Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint 

initiative of l’Agence Française de Développement, 

Conservation International, the European Union, 

the Global Environment Facility, the Government  

of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the  

World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil  

society is engaged in biodiversity conservation.



This document is part of a technical report series on conservation projects funded by the Critical 

Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and the Conservation International Pacific Islands Program 

(CI-Pacific). The main purpose of this series is to disseminate project findings and successes to a 

broader audience of conservation professionals in the Pacific, along with interested members of the 

public and students. The reports are being prepared on an ad-hoc basis as projects are completed 

and written up.

In most cases the reports are composed of two parts, the first part is a detailed technical report on 

the project which gives details on the methodology used, the results and any recommendations. The 

second part is a brief project completion report written for the donor and focused on conservation 

impacts and lessons learned.

The CEPF fund in the Polynesia-Micronesia region was launched in September 2008 and will be 

active until 2013. It is being managed as a partnership between CI Pacific and CEPF. The purpose 

of the fund is to engage and build the capacity of non-governmental organizations to achieve 

terrestrial biodiversity conservation. The total grant envelope is approximately US$6 million, and 

focuses on three main elements: the prevention, control and eradication of invasive species in key 

biodiversity areas (KBAs); strengthening the conservation status and management of a prioritized set 

of 60 KBAs and building the awareness and participation of local leaders and community members 

in the implementation of threatened species recovery plans.

Since the launch of the fund, a number of calls for proposals have been completed for 14 eligible 

Pacific Island Countries and Territories (Samoa, Tonga, Kiribati, Fiji, Niue, Cook Islands, Palau, FSM, 

Marshall Islands, Tokelau Islands, French Polynesia, Wallis and Futuna, Eastern Island, Pitcairn and 

Tokelau). By late 2012 more than 90 projects in 13 countries and territories were being funded. 

The Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot is one of the most threatened of Earth’s 34 

biodiversity hotspots, with only 21 percent of the region’s original vegetation remaining in pristine 

condition.  The Hotspot faces a large number of severe threats including invasive species, alteration 

or destruction of native habitat and over exploitation of natural resources.  The limited land area 

exacerbates these threats and to date there have been more recorded bird extinctions in this 

Hotspot than any other.  In the future climate change is likely to become a major threat especially for 

low lying islands and atolls which could disappear completely. 

For more information on the funding criteria and how to apply for a CEPF grant please visit:



 

www.cepf.net/where_we_work/regions/asia_pacific/polynesia_micronesia/Pages/default.aspx



 

www.cepf.net

For more information on Conservation International’s work in the Pacific please visit:

 

www.conservation.org/explore/asia-pacific/pacific_islands/pages/overview.aspx

or e-mail us at 

cipacific@conservation.org

ABOUT THE BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION 

LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES



Location of the project in the Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot

The Pacific 

Islands Region


About the Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series 

3

Lessons Learned 



7

Acknowledgements 

8

Building community support to search for the Red-



throated Lorikeet ‘Kulawai’ Charmosyna amabilis in Fiji

Species Recovery Plan 2013–2017 

9

Kulawai Survey Report January–March 2011 



29

Further Kulawai Surveys 2010–2011 

47

Promoting Awareness of the Red-throated Lorikeet 



65

CEPF Small Grant Final Project Completion Report  

73

Map 


Location of the project in the Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot  4 

Contents


PART 1

PART 2


PART 3

PART 4


PART 5

Charmosyna amabilis by St. George Jackson Mivart (1827–1900), 1896, R. H. Porter (London). 

Source:  http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/39965142



The primary objective of the project – to provide up to date information on the Red-throated 

Lorikeet was realized, although in the end the bulk of the work was undertaken by highly 

experienced bird observers rather than trained community members.

In retrospect, it was probably unrealistic to believe that with the resources the project could 

offer, one could train community youth to a level where they could independently undertake 

surveys for species such as the Red-throated Lorikeet which is both extremely rare (perceived 

situation at the beginning of the project) as well as being extremely difficult to detect (retiring, 

crepuscular nature of the bird). 

Project Design Process

Aspects of the project design that contributed to its success/shortcomings

Centering the project on the Tomaniivi Nature Club Site Support Group enabled the small 

grant resources to be applied immediately to activities with known individuals/communities. 

This dispensed with the necessary preliminaries of entry into and getting to know a 

new community(s) and their environment. Despite this we underestimated the logistical 

requirements (time and cost) of getting community members into the right location to 

undertake meaningful surveys for the Red-throated Lorikeet.

On the other-hand the project was flexible enough to switch the survey component to 

surveys being done by highly experienced bird observers, such that they were professionally 

implemented.

Project Implementation

Aspects of the project execution that contributed to its success/shortcomings

The project was flexible enough to switch the survey component to surveys originally planned 

for community members, being done by highly experienced bird observers, such that they were 

professionally implemented. This was especially important in that the initial surveys with the 

community members did not reveal any Red-throated Lorikeets indicating that a broader survey 

effort was required.

Overall the number and location of surveys combined with the experience of the observers 

provided a high level of confidence in the ‘negative’ result.

Lessons Learned

BUILDING COMMUNITY SUPPORT TO SEARCH 

FOR THE RED-THROATED LORIKEET IN FIJI 


Lessons Learned 

cont.

Acknowledgements

NatureFiji-MareqetiViti is grateful for funding from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund which 

catalysed all the components of this project. Dr Kerryn Herman volunteered her very considerable 

expertise to NatureFiji-MareqetiViti which provided a foundation on which the project was able to 

build. NatureFiji-MareqetiViti is also very grateful to Vilikesa Masibalavu for the series of surveys he 

undertook and to Mark O’Brien and Dick Watling for the surveys which they undertook.

Rochelle Steven added greatly to the project with her survey of community ecotourism potential 

and we are grateful to her and Dr Clare Morrison for this important contribution.

The project would not have been possible without the support of the Nadala community and, 

in particular, members of the Tomaniivi Nature Club. Kerryn Herman would like to thank Litia 

Taubere, Taivesi Saukuru and Meli Naiqama for their help in the field and in the organisation of 

her accommodation and general stay in Nadala and the Monasavu, in general; and, to Elizabeth 

Kalidredre for her hospitality and warmth.

Other lessons learned 

relevant to the conservation community

Although an attractive idea to both the community and the umbrella organisation, expecting 

untrained community members to become trained to make useful scientific observations of an 

extremely rare and difficult to detect bird, was probably unrealistic. This might be considered 

specific to the situation at Tomaniivi, the nature of the bird and the resources available from a small 

grant, but it also likely to be true in many similar situations when the competence of communities 

to be trained to undertake scientific observations is overestimated.


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

9

KULAWAI 



Red-throated Lorikeet Charmosyna amabilis

SPECIES RECOvERy PLAn

2013–2017

Abbreviations & Acronyms

 

ECF 


Environment Consultants Fiji Ltd.

IAS 


Institute of Applied Sciences (University of the South Pacific

IUCn 


International Union for the Conservation of nature

GoF 


Government of Fiji

nFMv 


natureFiji-Mareqetiviti

nGO 


non Government Organisation

Context


Taxonomy

Family   

 

Psittacidae



Scientific Name 

Charmosyna amabilis (E.P. Ramsey, 1875)



English Name   

Red-throated Lorikeet



Local Name   

Kulawai


Infraspecific Taxa 

 

None described. Original description appeared in Sydney Morning Herald 28 July 1875, this 

antedates Vini (Charmosyna) aureicincta (E.L. Layard, 1875) which is sometimes used for this species 

(Peters 1937; Amadon 1942 and others); refer Mayr (1945), Watling (1982).

PART 1


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

10

Conservation Status



IUCN Red Data List: Critically Endangered: C2a(i,ii);D 

(

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/106001381/0



 using 

ver 3.1


)

The Kulawai was last assessed by BirdLife International (2012) before the completion of the current 

project. Under this assessment the Kulawai qualifies as Critically Endangered because the lack of 

recent records, despite considerable survey effort, suggests it has:



C2. A continuing decline, observed, projected, or inferred, in numbers of mature individuals; 

C2a(i,ii). The remaining population is likely to comprise no subpopulation estimated to contain 

more than 50 mature individuals, and at least 90% of mature individuals in one subpopulation;



D. Population size estimated to number fewer than 50 mature individuals.

Past Range and Abundance

Kulawai specimens have been collected from Viti Levu, Ovalau and Taveuni in the past. No 

specimens have been collected from Vanua Levu, but that may be because the island has been 

very poorly collected (unconfirmed observations have been recorded from Vanua Levu). It has 

always been regarded as a rare species although there are 46 specimens in 11 museums around the 

world, and 12 specimens were collected during a one-month visit by the US Whitney South Seas 

Expedition in May 1925 (Attachment 1).

Recent Range and Abundance

Overview


Since 1965, there have been no confirmed records of the Kulawai (specimens, photographs or 

observations by those familiar with the species) on Taveuni or Ovalau. The last specimen collected 

on Taveuni was in 1912, and on Ovalau in the 1870s. There is a specimen from Viti Levu taken at 

Nadarivatu in 1977 (Fiji Museum – Attachment 1), and photographs taken from Monosavu in the 

mid 1970s (see cover page). 

Records of observations reported to Dick Watling

1

 for the Kulawai since 1965 are collated in 



Attachment 2 and summarised in Table 1. There have been 25 records of which 15 are considered 

confirmed, the last being in 1993. Some of the unconfirmed records are accompanied by detailed 

field notes and are likely to be good observations.

1  Records are maintained from experienced birders and ornithologists only. Observations are treated as unconfirmed if made without supporting 

photographs by: 1) an individual with no or little experience of Fijian birds; and/or, 2) in an area in which they have not previously been recorded.


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

11

Table 1: Reported Sightings of the Kulawai (Confirmed (C), Unconfirmed (UC) and Total (T) since 1965. 



Period

Viti Levu

Taveuni

Ovalau

Vanua Levu

Combined

C

UC

T

C

UC

T

C

UC

T

C

UC

T

C

UC

T

1965–75


8

3

11



1

1

8



4

12

1976–85



4

4

4



4

1986–95


3

3

1



1

1

1



3

2

5



1996–05

2

2



1

1

3



3

2006–


1

1

1



1

1

1



Total

15

6

21

3

3

1

1

1

1

15

10

25

Since 2000 when the IUCN Red Data Listing Threat level was raised from Vulnerable to Endangered 

because a lack of observations indicated a decline in the Kulawai population, there have been four 

specific searches for the Kulawai by experienced ornithologists. All of these have been unsuccessful.

K.Swynnerton and A.Maljkovic 2001–2002

Between November 2001 and April 2002, Swynnerton and Maljkovic conducted 79 days or part-

days of searches involving 373 man-hours of timed observations in likely Kulawai habitat on Viti 

Levu and Taveuni (Swynnerton & Maljkovic 2002). No Kulawai were observed during the three 

months of field observations. Trapping for rats was also undertaken and the number of black rats 

trapped in montane native forest was similar to numbers known in forests on other tropical islands 

where rats threaten endemic bird populations. Evidence collected of mongoose and feral cats 

suggested that they have penetrated into the forest interior, and may be a contributing factor to 

bird population declines.

v.Masibalavu and G.Dutson 2002–2005

Masibalavu and Dutson undertook 498 hours of further targeted surveys in forest areas on all 

four islands where the Kulawai has been recorded (Masibalavu & Dutson 2006). These searches 

also failed to find any Kulawai, after which the species’s threat status was re-classified to Critically 

Endangered in 2006.

v.Masibalavu and C.Mucklow 2008

Masibalavu & Mucklow (2008) report on 91 hours over 10 days of dedicated survey work between 

14 January and 25 January, 2008, in the Nadarivatu area surrounding Mt Tomaniivi and the 

Monasavu area. No Kulawai were observed.

natureFiji-Mareqetiviti Kulawai Project 2010–2012

NatureFiji-MareqetiViti (NFMV) received a small grant funding from the Critical Ecosystem 

Partnership Fund which enabled dedicated searching for the Kulawai and an attempt to 

train community members of NFMV’s Tomaniivi Nature Club to be able to search for the bird 

independently.


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

12

During the 18 month project period (Nov 2010 – June 2012) over 810 hours of searching was 



undertaken mainly in the upland Nadarivatu-Nadrau-Monasavu area of central Viti Levu, but also 

a significant survey was undertaken in the Wainavadu catchment – one of the least disturbed 

catchments in Viti Levu. The Kulawai was not observed.

Table 2: Component Surveys of the NFMV Kulawai Project (2010–2012)



Observer

Dates

Location

Duration

Reference

Dr Kerryn 

Herman

Feb-Mar 2011



Nadarivatu-Monosavu, Viti 

Levu


558 hours 

(including training 

of youth) 

Herman 


(2011)

Vilikesa 

Masibalavu

9-13 Nov 2010

Nadala, Viti Levu

24 hours 

(including training 

of youth)

Masibalavu 

(2012)


Vilikesa 

Masibalavu

21-24 Nov 2010

Naqaranibuluti and 

Nadarivatu

Nature Reserve, Viti Levu

24 hrs

Masibalavu 



(2012)

Vilikesa 

Masibalavu

11-13 Jun 2010

Monosavu Dam catchment, 

Viti Levu

23.5 hrs

Masibalavu 

(2012)

Vilikesa 



Masibalavu

14-16 July 2011

Nadarivatu, Monasavu, Viti 

Levu


17 hrs

Masibalavu 

(2012)

Vilikesa 



Masibalavu

7-10 Sept 2011

Namosi, Naitasiri (Waidina 

Rd.), Viti Levu

31.5 hrs

Masibalavu 

(2012)

Vilikesa 



Masibalavu

20-23 Sept 2011

Monasavu, Nadrau, Viti Levu

27 hrs


Masibalavu 

(2012)


Dick Watling

April 6th – May 

6th 2011

Wainavadu-Waisoi 

catchments, Namosi, Viti 

Levu


72 hrs

Watling 


(2011)

Dick Watling

June-Oct 2011

Nadarivatu, Nadala, Nadrau, 

Monosavu, Viti Levu

23 hrs


DW Notes

Rochelle 

Steven

May 2012


Nadala-Vatumoli, Viti Levu

12 hrs (including 

training of youth)

Steven 


(2012)

Mark O’Brien

Oct 2010-Sept 

2012


Des Voeux Peak area, 

Taveuni


7.5 hrs

O’Brien (in 

litt)

Mark O’Brien



Oct 2010-Sept 

2012


Namosi Road area, Viti Levu

18.5 hrs


O’Brien (in 

litt)


Total

2,122 hrs

Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

13

Other notable Forest Surveys by Ornithologists with 



Extensive Experience in Fiji

In the last decade there have been several significant ‘BioRap’ type or EIA baseline forest surveys by 

experienced Fijian and visiting ornithologists (with considerable experience in Fiji) are relevant to 

the search for the Kulawai. These include:



 

2002. Waivaka R. catchment, Namosi – ornithologists Dick Watling, Guy Dutson – 54 hrs of forest 

survey. No sightings of Kulawai. (Environment Consultants Fiji 2003);

 

2003-4. Two baseline surveys undertaken in the Sovi Basin for the PABITRA project. 

ornithologists – several led by Vilikesa Masibalavu. c.40 hrs of standardised surveys and many 

more hours of incidental observations. No sightings of Kulawai. (Morrison 2003, 2004);


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə