Lessons learned technical series



Yüklə 0.59 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/7
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.59 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

 

2006 – 23-26th May – ornithologists Dick Watling, Alifereti Naikatini camping at the headwaters 

of the Wainibau-Wainimakutu River below the Vunitoroilau ridge, Namosi, (Environment 

Consultants Fiji 2006);



 

2008. Nakauvadra Range, Ba – ornithologists Dick Watling, Alifereti Naikatini, Senivilati Vido 

– Conservation International BioRap. >100 hrs of standardised and unstandardised surveys + 

observation posts in forest and forest edge. No sightings of Kulawai (Environment Consultants 

Fiji 2008);

 

2009. Joske’s Thumb-Waimanu, Rewa – ornithologist Dick Watling – 15 hrs of standardised 

survey in forest and forest edge; 15 hours non-standardised observations. No sightings of 

Kulawai. (NatureFiji-MareqetiViti 2009);



 

2010. Nakorotubu – a RAP survey – ornithologists Vilikesa Masibalavu, Alifereti Naikatini. 38 hrs 

of forest, forest edge and open surveys. No sightings of Kulawai. (Morrison et al. 2011)

 

2012 Emalu – Navosa – ornithologists – Alifereti Naikatini, Senivilati Vido – 5 days in the field (25 

hrs searching presumed) (IAS in prep).

Summary of Recent Kulawai Searches

In the decade November 2001 – June 2012 a variety of experienced/highly experienced 

ornithologists undertook 2096 hrs of either focused searches for the Kulawai, or general forest bird 

surveys, without success. This represents 354 days of 6 hrs searching/observation. The Kulawai, 

like all of the Charmosyna are unobtrusive and very easily overlooked, even experienced field 

observers will likely miss the Kulawai on occasions unless they are specifically looking for them. 

The forest survey time is nonetheless sufficient to conclude that the Kulawai is extremely rare, and 

consideration be given to a status of extirpated from Viti Levu. 

That the Kulawai has become rarer since the 1970s is indubitable and the absence of recent 

confirmed observations in the uplands of Viti Levu leads to serious consideration having to be 

given to it being extirpated on Viti Levu. It should be noted that the late 1970s and 80’s saw 

major changes and developments in the Nadarivatu-Monosavu area with the construction of the 

Monosavu dam, the Nadarivatu-Wainimala-Serea ‘cross Viti Levu’ road being constructed, roads 

being constructed to nearly all the inland villages; major logging in the area by the Emperor Gold 

Mine; and, Nadala/Nadarivatu Forest Reserves being converted to pine/mahogany plantations and 

species/ provenance trial sites. At the same time there has been considerable movement out of 

villages by villagers to set up settlements or farmhouses along the roads. 



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

14

It is clear that since 1965 about 93% of search time for the Kulawai has been on Viti Levu; almost 



no time on Ovalau (one unconfirmed sighting); very little time on Vanua Levu (one unconfirmed 

sighting) and only two Kulawai-targeted and two general surveys on Taveuni (a total of about 156 

hours of survey time). During this period there have been three unconfirmed sightings over the 

years from visiting birders). At the same time, and in contrast to upland Viti Levu, there has been 

almost no change to the forests of Taveuni over the last 50 years and where there has been change 

it has been edge encroachment with the exception of the telecommunication development on Des 

Voeux Peak and access road. The vast majority of the forest on Taveuni remains untouched. There 

has been insufficient survey work on Taveuni, Vanua Levu and Ovalau to reach any conclusion on 

the Kulawai’s status on these islands.

Charmosyna Lorikeets

The genus Charmosyna comprises 14 species distributed from Buru Island (Indonesia) in the west 

through Irian Jaya, Papua New Guinea, Bismark Archipelago, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Santa Cruz 

islands and New Caledonia. The Kulawai in Fiji represents the eastern-most range of this genus. 

Four species are in the IUCN Red List (2012) as Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered. The 

New Caledonian lorikeet C.diadema is known only from two specimens collected in 1859 and an 

observation in 1913 (Forshaw 1989) and recent attempts to locate it have failed (Dutson 2011). The 

blue-fronted lorikeet C. toxopei is only definitively known from seven specimens collected in the 

1920s. Recent attempts to locate it failed and recent sightings are considered uncertain (BirdLife 

International 2012). Reasons for the decline and rarity of Charmosyna lorikeets are cited variously 

as small populations and restricted range, habitat destruction and degradation, avian malaria, 

cyclones and invasive species (Stattersfield & Capper 2000).

Ecology of the Kulawai

There is little information on most species of Charmosyna, they are notoriously difficult to find 

(Beehler et. al 1986) and characteristically inhabit mountainous regions with high rainfall (Juniper 

1998). The information available about the Kulawai is fragmentary and basically speculative.

Although generally regarded as being an inhabitant of mature forest, most observations of the 

Kulawai have been at the forest edge or in secondary or degraded forest areas. This may reflect 

that they may be easier to observe in such situations. Several Charmosyna lorikeets are regarded 

as being highly nomadic and others resident in the highland forests and making nomadic visits to 

the lowlands even between islands i.e. the Palm Lorikeet C.palmarum of N.Vanuatu and the Santa 

Cruz islands (Dutson 2011). In 1923, ornithologist Casey A. Wood describes Kulawai visiting Suva 

“Hypocharmosyna aureicincta, the pretty little Gold-collared Lorikeet, said by Layard to be found 

only on Ovalau, Viti Levu and Taveuni, is still seen occasionally on the two last-named islands, but is 

now probably extinct on the first. During my residence in Suva, a small flock for several days visited the 

garden of Sir Maynard Hedstrom and then disappeared. In Taveuni they are rarely seen away from the 

high mountains interior. The five skins in the Tring Museum were collected by T.H. Kleinschmidt in the 

interior of Viti Levu about 1872. I am afraid this charming little species is vanishing from Fiji” (Wood & 

Wetmore 1926).


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

15

It may well be that although the recent confirmed observations of the Kulawai indicate that it is not 



restricted to mature forest at all, it is the presence of such forests in the near vicinity which may act 

as refuges from which they visit forest edge and adjacent areas.

All the recent confirmed observations of the Kulawai have been in the highland forests of Viti Levu 

and it has been assumed that the Kulawai is now restricted to such high altitude localities. This 

would be similar to some of the other Charmosyna and it has been suggested that rats and other 

invasive predators may not be so numerous at higher altitudes. Such an ‘altitudinal’ restriction (if it 

exists) on Viti Levu and Vanua Levu may be artificial, reflecting the absence of ‘good’ forest, except 

at higher elevations. Certainly it has been found at lower elevations previously – all the Ovalau 

records are at ‘low elevation’.

With one or two exceptions, confirmed observations of the Kulawai have been made at three 

flowering trees – Vuga Metrosideros collina, Drala Erythrina variegata and Drala(wai) E.fusca. The first 

of these, Vuga, is abundant in the upland forest areas of Fiji as well as moist ridges in the lowlands 

– its flowering season is not well known. It appears to have an extended flowering season with 

irregular periods of concentrated flowering. Drala is a common secondary forest and agriculture-

associated tree which has a highly synchronised flowering season in August and a week or two 

either side. Dralawai is very local but occurring in some large stands and flowers less synchronously 

than Drala – probably July to October. 

Observations of the Kulawai have always been in the canopy, often of tall trees where it is usually 

extremely unobtrusive and difficult to detect except when actually feeding on the flowers. It is 

most often first detected while flying (Watling pers. obs.).

Threats

As noted previously the area where the Kulawai is best known from and where a decline is 



obvious, the Nadarivatu-Monosavu area, is also an area where there has been significant increase 

in development, infrastructure and human presence since 1965. Each of these factors which may 

have had a direct impact. Nonetheless there is still much forest in the area which is contiguous 

with the remaining areas of undisturbed forest on Viti Levu. Rather than a direct impact, an indirect 

impact through an increase in invasive black rats Rattus rattus may well be a more immediate 

reason for the decline. Swynnerton & Maljkovic (2003) showed that black rats are present in the 

montane native forest there in similar numbers known in forests on other tropical islands where 

rats threaten endemic bird populations. It is well known that the small lories and lorikeets of the 

Pacific are extremely vulnerable to predation by rats (eg McCormack & Künzlè (1996), Ziembecki 

& Raust (2004), Seitre & Seitre (1992) but see Watling (1995) and it is quite possible that black rats 

are the immediate cause of the decline in Kulawai in the Nadarivatu-Monasavu area, with black 

rats increasing in the area in conjunction with infrastructure development and more widespread 

presence of village gardens and farms. This is all just guesswork, however.


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

16

Figure 1: Location Map. Islands and localities mentioned in the report (forest cover in green)



Plate: 1: Filamentous flowers of Vuga – Metrosideros collina apparently much

 favoured by the Kulawai (Photo – Dick Watling-NFMV)

Plate: 2: Characteristic flowering Vuga – Metrosideros collina tree – a common species in highland forest 

all over Fiji and down to low elevations on forested ridges (Photo – Vilikesa Masibalavu).



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

17

Plate: 3: Drala – Erythrina variegata orientalis. Common tree of 



the forest edge, fallow and farmland visited by Kulawai (photo 

by Richard Parker smallislander on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/

photos/28722516@N02/2768789889/ )

Plate: 5: Dralawai flower Erythrina fusca. Photo 

by palmbob. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/

showimage/38377/

Plate: 4: Dralawai tree – local tree of wet sites Erythrina 

fuscaPhoto by palmbob http://davesgarden.com/

guides/pf/showimage/38378/


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

18

Recovery Plan



Is Knowledge About the Kulawai adequate for Objectives and 

Actions to be Defined Accurately?

Very little is known about the Kulawai and it is clearly insufficient to enable detailed objectives to be 

drawn up other than to confirm its continued existence and then acquire more basic information.

Recovery Objectives for the Kulawai, Red-throated Lorikeet

The following are the immediate objectives for the Kulawai recovery plan, they are focused 

primarily on determining more basic information about the bat on which conservation 

management measures could be drawn up:



 

Phase Confirm the continued existence of the Kulawai (Phase 1); 



 

If Phase 1 successful then Phase 2:



 

Undertake captive husbandry of the Kulawai in Fiji; and



 

Attain a good understanding of the ecology and behaviour of the Kulawai; and,



 

Ensure good public and corporate awareness throughout Fiji of this iconic bird.

RECOvERy ACTIOnS

CONFIRM THE KULAWAI’S CONTINUED ExISTENCE

The priority location for searching for the Kulawai should now shift from the uplands of Viti Levu to 

Taveuni:


Priority Action:

Targeted surveys in all forest areas on Taveuni for at least a full annual cycle.

Additional Actions:

Continued surveys in the forests of Viti Levu, Vanua Levu and Ovalau

UNDERTAKE CAPTIVE HUSBANDRY OF THE KULAWAI IN FIJI

Captive husbandry of the Kulawai needs to be developed – at the moment this is only possible at 

the Kula Eco Park which is already well established in the captive breeding of Critically Endangered 

iguanas. It has some experience in breeding nectivorous lories as the Collared Lory Phigys solitarius 

breeds at the facility. 

Priority Actions:

Locate a highly experienced international lorikeet breeding facility to work with the Kula Eco Park

2

;



2   Several species of Charmosyna are kept and bred in captivity and so there is avicultural knowledge for this genus. It is a matter of locating it and 

arranging an appropriate association with Kula Eco-Park.



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

19

Be prepared to initiate the captive breeding programme as soon as a population is located with 



potential for capture of several individuals;

ATTAIN A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF THE ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR OF 

THE KULAWAI

Assess ways to investigate breeding behaviour and ecological requirements of the Kulawai, in order 

to better address factors driving the current declines.

Priority Action:

Experienced ornithologists to undertake ecological and behavioural studies of the Kulawai when a 

population has been located.

Additional Action:

Reach a better understanding of the flowering cycle of the Vuga Metrosideros collina.

ENSURE GOOD PUBLIC AND CORPORATE AWARENESS ABOUT THE KULAWAI

The support of Fiji’s wider community for forest habitat conservation and conservation of the 

Kulawai is essential to its long term survival. This will not be provided unless there is a good level 

of awareness at all levels of Fiji’s wider community about the significance of this iconic bird and its 

apparent imminent or recent demise. A good start has already been made through the use of the 

name Kulawai for the National Ladies Volleyball team, and this branding should be continued and 

promoted further. 

Priority Actions:

Prepare materials on the Kulawai in the vernacular;

Undertake awareness campaigns in schools, communities and the corporate sector.

Figure 2: Kulawai – Logo of the Ladies National Volleyball Team

Organisations Responsible for Conservation

Government lead: Department of Environment, National Trust of Fiji; 

Local Conservation Organisations: NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, Institute of Applied Sciences, University 

of the South Pacific; 

International Organisation: BirdLife International, Conservation International 

Other organisations involved: Traditional landowners, Kula Eco-park and experienced Lory/Lorikeet 

breeding facility (to be identified).



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

20

Staff and Financial Resources Required



PHASE 1 FUND RAISING

Fundraising is to be the responsibility of the lead non-government organisations working in 

Fiji – NatureFiji-MareqetiViti (NFMV); Institute of Applied Sciences (University of the South Pacific); 

BirdLife International (BLI – Preventing Extinctions Programme) and Conservation International (CI), 

together with the National Trust of Fiji.

PHASE 1 PERSONNEL

Local Base and Coordination

NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, the National Trust of Fiji or the Institute of Applied Sciences (University of 

the South Pacific) are the potential local bases for the survey and its personnel, and will need to 

coordinate the programme at the national, provincial and local levels. 

The most important position is the Lead Surveyor who needs to be a highly motivated and very 

experienced field ornithologist who has the temperament to work in the field for long periods and 

be able to cope with frustrations commonplace in forest field work in Fiji – especially bad weather, 

customary protocols etc.

The Local Counterpart needs to be a field biologist preferably one with experience in bird survey 

work. The Counterpart needs to be able to deal with all issues relating to customary protocols 

and in addition to gaining experience with the Lead Surveyor has the responsibility of working 

with local guides and assistants and identifying talented and motivated individuals who have the 

potential to become independent Kulawai surveyors.

PHASE 1 FINANCIAL RESOURCES

Table 3 provides the budget for Phase 1 of the Kulawai Recovery Programme

PHASE 2 PERSONNEL AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES

The resources required for Phase 2 are dependent on the outcome of Phase 1 and will be drawn up 

after a review of Phase 1. 

Table 3: Kulawai Recovery Programme – Phase 1 Financial Resources

18 month Survey Programme

 

 

Exchange Rate: 0.565

Category/Budget Item

Cost Calculation

Unit Cost Number

Total Cost

Personnel

US$

(US$)

US$

F$

Project Director: Dick 

Watling

1.5 months @$5,000/m



5000

1.5


 $ 7,500.00 

 $ 13,274.34 

Salary: Lead Surveyor 

– Experienced field 

ornithologist

$2,500 per month – 18 

months

2500


18

 $ 45,000.00 

 $ 79,646.02 


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

21

Salary: Counterpart/Local 



ornithologist/ trainer of 

community members

$1,000 per month – 18 

months


1000

18

 $ 18,000.00 



 $ 31,858.41 

Local Guides

400 man days @ $15/day

15

400



 $ 6,000.00 

 $ 10,619.47 



Travel

Vehicle


12,000 km @ US$0.9/km

0.9


12000

 $ 10,800.00 

 $ 19,115.04 

Inter-island transport: 

Ferry

10 return ferry trips for 



vehicle;

200


10

 $ 2,000.00 

 $ 3,539.82 

Inter-island transport: 

Plane

10 return plane trips 



for lead surveyor/

counterpart

150

10

 $ 1,500.00 



 $ 2,654.87 

Lodging and meals

Field Base Rent Taveuni

12 months @ $300/month 300

12

 $ 3,600.00 



 $ 6,371.68 

Villages 

200 man/nights @ $20

200


20

 $ 4,000.00 

 $ 7,079.65 

Supplies

Field Equipment (Field 

Camping Eqpt – normal 

4 man team (Surveyor/

counterpart/2 local guides) 

Lump Sum


10000

1

 $ 10,000.00 



 $ 17,699.12 

Field Equipment 

(Binoculars, Scopes, 

Recorders, Playback etc.)

Lump Sum

5000


1

 $ 5,000.00 

 $ 8,849.56 

Field team supplies

$1000/month (food; 

camping eqpt., field 

clothing, fuel, batteries 

etc.) 


1000

12

 $ 12,000.00 



 $ 21,238.94 

Awareness/Community Outreach

 Community Meetings, 

Sevusevu etc.

 2 village meetings /field 

month @ $30/meeting – 

LS or Counterpart

30

12

 $ 360.00 



 $ 637.17 

Production/printing of 

material; media

Lump Sum


5000

1

 $ 5,000.00 



 $ 8,849.56 

Subtotals

 

 



 

 $ 130,760.00 

$231,433.63 

Indirect costs 

0.1


 

 

 $ 13,076.00 



 $ 23,143.36 

Contingency

Field Evacuation and 

other

 

 



 $ 6,164.00 

 $ 10,909.73 

 

Grand Total

 

 

 $150,000.00  $265,486.73 


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

22

References



Amadon, D. 1942. Birds Collected during the Whitney South Sea Expedition. L. Notes on some non-

passerine genera. American Museum Novitiates 1176: 1-21.

Beehler, B.M., Pratt, T.K. and Zimmerman, D.A. 1986. Birds of New Guinea. Princeton: Princeton 

University Press. 

BirdLife International 2012. Charmosyna amabilis. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 

Version 2012.1. <

www.i

ucnredlist.org>. Do



wnloaded on 22 September 2012.

BirdLife International 2012 Species factsheet: Charmosyna toxopei. Downloaded from 

http:

//www.


birdlife.org on 2

4/09/2012. 

Dutson, G. 2011. Birds of Melanesia: The Bismarks, Solomons, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Christopher 

Helm, London.

Environment Consultants Fiji 2003. Report of the Preliminary Baseline Survey of the Terrestrial Vertebrate 

Fauna of the Waivaka Catchment, Namosi, Viti Levu. Report for Nittetsu Mining Co. Ltd., Suva

Environment Consultants Fiji 2006. DRAFT – Environmental Impact Assessment of the Proposed 132 

kV Transmission Line – Wailoa to Hibiscus Park. Asian Development Bank, Renewable Power Sector 

Development Project ADB TA 4764-FIJ. Suva

Environment Consultants Fiji 2008. Report of a Preliminary Baseline Survey of the Avifauna of the 

Nakauvadra Range, Ra, Viti Levu. Report for Conservation International.

Forshaw, J.M. 1989. Parrots of the World. Third (revised) edition. Lansdowne Editions, Melbourne, 

Australia.

Herman, K. J. 2011. Red-throated Lorikeet “Kulawai” Charmosyna amabilis Monasavu-Tomanivi, Viti Levu. 

Report from January – March 2011 survey. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # MV18: 

2011/06, Suva.

IAS (in prep.) Biodiversity Survey of the Emalu Forest, Navosa. Institute of Applied Sciences, University 

of the South Pacific for GIZ.

Juniper, T. & M. Parr, 1998. Parrots. A Guide to the Parrots of the World. Pica Press, Robertsbridge.

Macedru, K. 2012. Promoting Awareness of the Kulawai, Red-throated Lorikeet Charmosyna amabilis. 

An Exhibition of Models and Masi Paintings of Endangered Fijian Fauna at the Fiji Museum and their 

Auction for the Project. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # MV18: 2012/11, Suva.

Masibalavu, V. and G. Dutson, 2006. Important Bird Areas in Fiji: Conserving Fiji’s Natural Heritage. 

BirdLife International, Suva.

Masibalavu, V. and C. Mucklow. 2008. Red-throated Lorikeet Survey January 2008 including 

recommendations for future survey work for this Critically Endangered species in Fiji. Unpublished 

Report, BirdLife International, Suva.

Masibalavu, V. 2011. Reports of surveys of the Red-throated Lorikeet, Kulawai Charmosyna amabilis with 

the Tomaniivi Nature Club, Nadala, Ba, Vti Levu. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # 

MV18: 2011/12, Suva.

Mayr, E. 1945. The Correct Name of the Fijian Mountain Lorikeet. Auk 62:139-140


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

23

Gerald Mccormack and Judith Kunzle (1996). The ‘Ura or Rimatara Lorikeet Vini kuhlii: its former 



range, present status, and conservation priorities.. Bird Conservation International, 6, pp 325334 

doi:10.1017/S0959270900001805

Morrison, C. 2003. PABITRA Baseline Flora and Fauna Survey of the Sovi Basin, Naitasiri, 5-17th May, 

2003. Institute of Applied Science, University of the South Pacific, Suva

Morrison, C. 2004. PABITRA 2nd Baseline Flora and Fauna Survey of the Sovi Basin, Naitasiri, 13-20th 

October, 2004. Institute of Applied Science, University of the South Pacific, Suva

Morrison, C., S.Nawadra and M.Tuiwawa (Eds) 2011. A RAP Baseline Survey of the Nakorotubu Range, 

Ra and Tailevu Province, Viti Levu, Fiji. RAP Bulletin of Biological Assessment 59. Conservation 

International, Arlington, VA, USA 

Mayr, E. 1945. The Correct Name of the Fijian Mountain Lorikeet. Auk 62:139-140.

Peters, J.L. 1937. Checklist of the Birds of the World. Vol III. Harvard University Press, Cambridge

Ramsay, E.P. 1875. Trichoglossus (Glossopsitta) amabilis. Nov. sp. (Ramsay). Sydney Morning Herald 28 

July 1875.

Ramsay, E.P. 1877a. A new species of Trichoglossus. Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, 1: 30-32.

Ramsay, E.P. 1877b. Remarks on a collection of birds lately received from Fiji, and now forming part of 

the Macleayan Collection at Elizabeth Bay; with a list of all the species at present known to inhabit 

the Fiji Islands. Proc. Linn. Soc. New South Wales, 1: 69-82.

Stattersfield, A.J. and Capper, D.R. 2000. Threatened Birds of the World. Birdlife International. Barcelona 

and Cambridge, U.K., Lynx Editions and Birdlife International.

Seitre, R. and Seitre, J. 1992 Causes of land-bird extinctions in French Polynesia. Oryx 26: 215-222. 

Steven, Rochelle 2012. An investigative study into whether the Nadala/Vatumoli area could support 

nature-based tourism; and, a survey for the Critically Endangered Red-throated Lorikeet (Charmosyna 

amabilis). Unpublished report prepared for NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, Griffith School of Environment 

and International Centre for Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

Swinnerton, K. and Maljkovic, A. 2002. The Red-throated Lorikeet Charmosyna amabilis in the Fiji Islands. 

Unpublished report to National Trust Fiji, World Parrot Trust and Environment Consultants (Fiji) Ltd. 

Watling, Dick 1982. Birds of Fiji, Tonga and Samoa. Millwood Press, Wellington

Watling, Dick 1995. Notes on the status of Kuhl’s Lorikeet Vini kuhlii in the Northern Line Islands, 

Kiribati. Bird Conservation International 5:481-489

Watling, Dick 2009. Report on the Birds with Particular Reference to Threatened Species of the Joske’s 

Thumb forests, Viti Levu, Fiji. Unpublished NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Report, Suva

Watling, Dick 2011. Report on the Birds with Particular Reference to Threatened Species of the Wainavadu-

Waisoi Catchments, Namosi, Viti Levu, Fiji. Unpublished NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Report # MV18: 

2011/11, Suva

Wood, C.A. and Wetmore A. 1926. A Collection of Birds from the Fiji Islands. Part III Field Observations 

(Casey A. Wood). Ibis 1926:91-136 

Ziembicki, M. and Raust, P. (2006). Status and conservation of the Vini lorikeets of French Polynesia. 

Report to the Loro Parque Foundation & CEPA. Société d’Ornithologie de Polynésie, Papeete, 

French Polynesia.


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

24

Attachment 1



Red-throated lorikeet Specimens in Museum Collections.

(from Swinnerton & Maljkovic 2002)

Museums are: Macleay (Sydney), Liverpool (UK), British Museum of Natural History (Tring, UK), Australian Museum 

(Sydney), Philadelphia Academy of Sciences (USA), Natural History Museum Vienna (Austria), American Museum of Natural 

History (Washington), Delaware Museum of Natural History (USA), Fiji Museum (Suva Fiji), Victoria Museum (Melbourne). 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə